Rein Verbeke

Rein Verbeke
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of Pharmaceutics

Doctor of Pharmacy

About

23
Publications
57,174
Reads
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981
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
971 Citations
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Introduction
My current work focuses on the development of nanoparticulate based strategies for cancer immunotherapy and mRNA-based vaccination. Research interests include mRNA delivery, vaccination, liposomal carriers and immunology.

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
The lipid nanoparticle (LNP)-encapsulated, nucleoside-modified mRNA platform has been used to generate safe and effective vaccines in record time against COVID-19. Here, we review the current understanding of the manner whereby mRNA vaccines induce innate immune activation and how this contributes to protective immunity. We discuss innate immune se...
Article
Full-text available
Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne intracellular bacterial pathogen leading to human listeriosis. Despite a high mortality rate and increasing antibiotic resistance no clinically approved vaccine against Listeria is available. Attenuated Listeria strains offer protection and are tested as antitumor vaccine vectors, but would benefit from a bette...
Preprint
Full-text available
Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne intracellular bacterial pathogen leading to human listeriosis. Despite a high mortality rate and increasing antibiotic resistance no clinically approved vaccine against Listeria is available. Attenuated Listeria strains offer protection and are tested as antitumor vaccine vectors, but would benefit from a bette...
Article
Full-text available
In this brief perspective, we describe key events in the history of the lipid-based nanomedicine field, highlight Canadian contributions, and outline areas where lipid nanoparticle technology is poised to have a transformative effect on the future of medicine.
Article
Purpose: The pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) involves presentation of islet-specific self-antigens by dendritic cells (DCs) to autoreactive T cells, resulting in the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. We aimed to study the dynamic homing of diabetes-prone DCs to the pancreas and nearby organs with and without induction o...
Article
The recent approval of messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccines to combat the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic highlights the potential of both conventional mRNA and self-amplifying mRNA (saRNA) as a flexible immunotherapy platform to treat infectious diseases. Besides the antigen it encodes, mRNA itself has an immune-stimulating activity that can contribute to vacc...
Article
Full-text available
A drawback of the current mRNA-lipid nanoparticle (LNP) COVID-19 vaccines is that they have to be stored at (ultra)low temperatures. Understanding the root cause of the instability of these vaccines may help to rationally improve mRNA-LNP product stability and thereby ease the temperature conditions for storage. In this review we discuss proposed s...
Article
Full-text available
mRNA therapeutics have become the focus of molecular medicine research. Various mRNA applications have reached major milestones at high speed in the immuno-oncology field. This can be attributed to the knowledge that mRNA is one of nature’s core building blocks carrying important information and can be considered as a powerful vector for delivery o...
Article
In less than one year since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, two mRNA-based vaccines, BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273, were granted the first historic authorization for emergency use, while another mRNA vaccine, CVnCoV, progressed to phase 3 clinical testing. The COVID-19 mRNA vaccines represent a new class of vaccine products, which consist of synthe...
Article
Full-text available
Efcient and safe cell engineering by transfection of nucleic acids remains one of the long-standing hurdles for fundamental biomedical research and many new therapeutic applications, such as CAR T cell-based therapies. mRNA has recently gained increasing attention as a more safe and versatile alternative tool over viral- or DNA transposon-based app...
Book
Full-text available
The COVIPENDIUM, a living paper on the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19), provides a structured compilation of scientific data about the virus, the disease and its control. Its objective is to help scientists identify the most relevant publications on COVID-19 in the mass of information that appears every day. It is also expected to foster a globa...
Article
Full-text available
To date, mRNA-based biologics have mainly been developed for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination to combat infectious diseases or cancer. In the past years, optimization of the characteristics of in vitro transcribed mRNA has led to significant reduction of the inflammatory responses. Thanks to this, mRNA therapeutics have entered the field of...
Article
Full-text available
The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is ubiquitous in nature and the most common cause of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with a compromised immune system. The development of IPA in patients under immunosuppressive treatment or in patients with primary immunodeficiency demonstrates the importance of the host immune response in contro...
Article
Full-text available
In the early nineties, pioneering steps were taken in the use of mRNA as a therapeutic tool for vaccination. In the following decades, an improved understanding of the mRNA pharmacology, together with novel insights in immunology have positioned mRNA-based technologies as next-generation vaccines. This review outlines the history and current state-...
Article
Messenger RNA encoding tumor antigens has the potential to evoke effective antitumor immunity. This study reports on a nanoparticle platform, named mRNA Galsomes, that successfully co-delivers nucleoside-modified antigen-encoding mRNA and the glycolipid antigen and immunopotentiator α-Galactosylceramide (α-GC) to antigen-presenting cells after intr...
Conference Paper
Messenger RNA has garnered a lot of attention as a new therapeutic drug class for vaccination (1). Particularly for cancer immunotherapy, mRNA encoding tumor antigens has the potential to design personalized and effective cancer vaccines (2). However, the major challenge remains to directly deliver the mRNA to (professional) antigen presenting cell...
Article
Objective Tracking the autoreactive T-cell migration in the pancreatic region after labeling with fluorinated nanoparticles (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate]-perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether nanoparticles, PDP-PFCE NPs) in a diabetic murine model using ¹⁹F MRI. Materials and methods Synthesis of novel PDP-P...
Article
PurposeTransplantation of pancreatic islets (PIs) is a promising therapeutic approach for type 1 diabetes. The main obstacle for this strategy is that the outcome of islet engraftment depends on the engraftment site. It was our aim to develop a strategy for using non-invasive imaging techniques to assess the location and fate of transplanted PIs lo...
Article
Full-text available
This study reports on the design of mRNA and adjuvant-loaded lipid nanoparticles for therapeutic cancer vaccination. The use of nucleoside-modified mRNA has previously been shown to improve the translational capacity and safety of mRNA-therapeutics, as it prevents the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). However, type I IFNs were identified as t...
Article
Full-text available
Cancer vaccines based on mRNA are extensively studied. The fragile nature of mRNA has instigated research into carriers that can protect it from ribonucleases and as such enable its systemic use. However, carrier-mediated delivery of mRNA has been linked to production of type I interferon (IFN) that was reported to compromise the effectiveness of m...
Article
Over the years research in the field of cancer immunotherapy has flourished, bringing about crucial breakthroughs, but at the same time revealing new and important pathways of immune suppression that put a break on the success of cancer immunotherapy. This review focuses on how nano- and micromaterials can be used to induce antitumor immune respons...
Article
Full-text available
Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccination has shown great potential in cancer immunotherapy. As a result, novel nanoparticles aiming to load DCs with tumor antigens are being developed and evaluated in vitro. For this, murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) are most commonly used as model DCs. However, many different protocols exist to generate...

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