Reid Tingley

Reid Tingley
Monash University (Australia) · School of Biological Sciences, Clayton

BSc (H), MSc, PhD

About

80
Publications
42,463
Reads
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4,884
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - present
Monash University
Position
  • Lecturer
July 2017 - January 2019
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Fellow
June 2015 - June 2017
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (80)
Article
Species distribution models (SDMs) are used to inform a range of ecological, biogeographical and conservation applications. However, users often underestimate the strong links between data type, model output and suitability for end-use. We synthesize current knowledge and provide a simple framework that summarizes how interactions between data type...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate forecasts of biological invasions are crucial for managing invasion risk but are hampered by niche shifts resulting from evolved environmental tolerances (fundamental niche shifts) or the presence of novel biotic and abiotic conditions in the invaded range (realized niche shifts). Distinguishing between these kinds of niche shifts is impos...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the factors that determine rates of range expansion is not only crucial for developing risk assessment schemes and management strategies for invasive species, but also provides important insight into the ability of species to disperse in response to climate change. However, there is little knowledge on why some invasions spread faster...
Article
Full-text available
Species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly proposed to support conservation decision making. However, evidence of SDMs supporting solutions for on-ground conservation problems is still scarce in the scientific literature. Here, we show that successful examples exist but are still largely hidden in the grey literature, and thus less accessi...
Article
Spatial heterogeneity in environmental conditions may restrict the spread of invasive species to narrow corridors between extensive patches of suitable habitat; thus, we may be able to curtail invasions by identifying such corridors, and focusing control efforts in these areas. Invasive cane toads Rhinella marina have spread rapidly through norther...
Article
Full-text available
Context The cane toad ( Rhinella marina ) is one of the most globally significant and well-studied invasive alien species, and the detrimental impacts of its invasions warrant the design and application of decision support tools. While many models have been developed for guiding policies addressing cane toad invasions, none reliably predict the spe...
Article
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The Red List of Threatened Species, published by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), is a crucial tool for conservation decision-making. However, despite substantial effort, numerous species remain unassessed or have insufficient data available to be assigned a Red List extinction risk category. Moreover, the Red Listing proc...
Article
Fire creates habitats for many animals but changes in fire activity threaten species worldwide. While conservation assessments routinely identify fire as a threat to lizards and snakes, the processes underlying fire‐driven population declines have received less attention. Assessing the effects of fire on demographic processes – survival, reproducti...
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Aim The incidence of major fires is increasing globally, creating extraordinary challenges for governments, managers and conservation scientists. In 2019–2020, Australia experienced precedent‐setting fires that burned over several months, affecting seven states and territories and causing massive biodiversity loss. Whilst the fires were still burni...
Article
Geographic range size varies greatly across species. Climate, along with aspects of a species’ biology, may influence its spatial extent. We investigate intrinsic and extrinsic predictors of range size in Australian skinks. We predicted that larger body size, longer limbs, and larger clutch sizes would be associated with larger ranges, and that ran...
Article
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Australia is in the midst of an extinction crisis, having already lost 10% of terrestrial mammal fauna since European settlement and with hundreds of other species at high risk of extinction. The decline of the nation's biota is a result of an array of threatening processes; however, a comprehensive taxon-specific understanding of threats and their...
Article
Aim: Identification of particular traits that predispose species to elevated extinction risk is an important component of proactive conservation. We capitalise on a recent strategic extinction risk assessment of all Australian squamate reptiles to identify intrinsic life history traits and extrinsic threats that correlate with extinction risk. We f...
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Global biodiversity loss is a profound consequence of human activity. Disturbingly, biodiversity loss is greater than realized because of the unknown number of undocumented species. Conservation fundamentally relies on taxonomic recognition of species, but only a fraction of biodiversity is described. Here, we provide a new quantitative approach fo...
Article
Rocky environments host rich levels of biodiversity and provide vital habitat for specialised organisms, range‐restricted species, and a broad range of ectotherms adapted to saxicoline environments. In Australia, rock habitat is being destroyed during soil amelioration practices associated with agricultural intensification. Advances in rock crushin...
Article
Our knowledge of the conservation status of reptiles, the most diverse class of terrestrial vertebrates, has improved dramatically over the past decade, but still lags behind that of the other tetrapod groups. Here, we conduct the first comprehensive evaluation (~92% of the world's ~1714 described species) of the conservation 1 Joint senior authors...
Article
Aim Climatic variation has long been regarded as a primary source of morphological variation. However, there is mixed support for the adherence of reptiles to ecogeographical hypotheses, such as Bergmann’s rule (body size decreases with temperature) and Allen’s rule (limb length increases with temperature). We quantified body and limb morphology am...
Article
Joint species distribution models (JSDMs) simultaneously model the distributions of multiple species, while accounting for residual co-occurrence patterns. Despite increasing adoption of JSDMs in the literature, the question of how to define and evaluate JSDM predictions has only begun to be explored. We define four different JSDM prediction types...
Article
Full-text available
Islands are increasingly used to protect endangered populations from the negative impacts of invasive species. Quarantine efforts on islands are likely to be undervalued in circumstances in which a failure incurs non-economic costs. One approach to ascribe monetary value to such efforts is by modeling the expense of restoring a system to its former...
Article
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling can provide accurate, cost-effective, landscape-level data on species distributions. Previous studies have compared the sensitivity of eDNA sampling to traditional sampling methods for single species, but similar comparative studies on multi-species eDNA metabarcoding are rare. Using hierarchical site occupancy det...
Article
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Australia hosts approximately 10% of the world's reptile species, the largest number of any country. Despite this and evidence of widespread decline, the first comprehensive assessment of the conservation status of Australian terrestrial squamates (snakes and lizards) was undertaken only recently. Here we apply structured expert elicitation to the...
Article
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Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is a promising method for surveying aquatic fauna. Recent eDNA studies have investigated the likelihood of false negative errors in the laboratory and in the field, but the likelihood of false positives remains poorly studied. We investigated the likelihood of both types of errors in eDNA surveys of an Australian t...
Article
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Niche shifts and environmental non-equilibrium in invading alien species undermine niche-based predictions of alien species’ potential distributions and, consequently, their usefulness for invasion risk assessments. Here, we compared the realized climatic niches of four alien amphibian species (Hylarana erythraea, Rhinella marina, Hoplobatrachus ru...
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1. The vulnerability of species to climate change is jointly influenced by geographic phenotypic variation, acclimation, and behavioral thermoregulation. The importance of interactions between these factors, however, remains poorly understood. 2. We demonstrate how advances in mechanistic niche modelling can be used to integrate and assess the inf...
Article
1. Species population dynamics are driven by spatial and temporal changes in the environment, anthropogenic activities, and conservation management actions. Understanding how populations will change in response to these drivers is fundamental to a wide range of ecological applications, but there are few open‐source software options accessible to re...
Article
Environmental DNA, or eDNA—DNA shed from organisms and extracted from environmental samples—is an emerging survey technique that has the potential to transform biodiversity monitoring in freshwater ecosystems. We provide a brief overview of the primary methodological aspects of eDNA sampling that ecologists should consider before taking environment...
Article
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Modeling suggests that excluding invasive cane toads from artificial water points (e.g., pastoral dams) along an arid coastal corridor in Western Australia would create a “waterless barrier” halting their spread. In this study, we explored one critical assumption of these models: that toads cannot persist in the corridor during the dry season witho...
Article
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Insights into the causal mechanisms that limit species distributions are likely to improve our ability to anticipate species range shifts in response to climate change. For species with complex life‐histories, a mechanistic understanding of how climate affects different lifecycle stages may be crucial for making accurate forecasts. Here we use mech...
Article
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Containing the spread of established invasive species is critical for minimizing their ecological impact. Effective containment requires sensitive sampling methods capable of detecting new introductions when invaders are at low density. Here we explore whether environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling could be used as a surveillance tool to detect new incu...
Book
Lizards and snakes (squamate reptiles) are the most diverse vertebrate group in Australia, with approximately 1000 described species, representing about 10% of the global squamate diversity. Squamates are a vital part of the Australian ecosystem, but their conservation has been hindered by a lack of knowledge of their diversity, distribution, biolo...
Article
1.Joint species distribution models (JSDMs) account for biotic interactions and missing environmental predictors in correlative species distribution models. Several different JSDMs have been proposed in the literature, but the use of different or conflicting nomenclature and statistical notation potentially obscures similarities and differences amo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Islands are increasingly used to protect endangered populations from the negative impacts of invasive species. Quarantine efforts are particularly likely to be undervalued in circumstances where a failure incurs non-economic costs. One approach to ascribe value to such efforts is by modeling the expense of restoring a system to its former state. Us...
Article
Full-text available
Cities tend to be built in areas of high biodiversity, and the accelerating pace of urbanization threatens the persistence of many species and ecological communities globally. However, urban environments also offer unique prospects for biological conservation, with multiple benefits for humans and other species. We present seven ecological principl...
Article
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A critical step towards reducing the incidence of extinction is to identify and rank the species at highest risk, while implementing protective measures to reduce the risk of extinction to such species. Existing global processes provide a graded categorisation of extinction risk. Here we seek to extend and complement those processes to focus more n...
Article
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is a promising tool for monitoring cryptic species. Numerous studies have demonstrated that eDNA sampling can achieve higher detection rates than traditional monitoring techniques, such as trapping; however, the consequences of that sensitivity for survey design requirements and resulting survey costs have not been...
Article
1.Accurate knowledge of species occurrence is fundamental to a wide variety of ecological, evolutionary, and conservation applications. Assessing the presence or absence of species at sites is often complicated by imperfect detection, with different mechanisms potentially contributing to false negative and/or false positive errors at different samp...
Article
Full-text available
Our best hope of developing innovative methods to combat invasive species is likely to come from the study of high-profile invaders that have attracted intensive research not only into control, but also basic biology. Here we illustrate that point by reviewing current thinking about novel ways to control one of the world’s most well-studied invasio...
Article
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The number of alien species transported as stowaways is steadily increasing, and new approaches are urgently needed to tackle this emerging invasion pathway. We introduce a general framework for identifying high-risk transport pathways and receiving sites for alien species that are unintentionally transported via goods and services. This approach c...
Article
Understanding the locations of potential invasion hotspots and the extent to which they overlap with biodiversity hotspots is crucial for prioritizing efforts to reduce the impacts of alien species on global biodiversity. Using ensembles of species distribution models based on climate, anthropogenic predictors, vegetation, and water resources, we p...
Article
Limited conservation resources mean that management decisions are often made on the basis of scarce biological information. Species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly proposed as a way to improve the representation of biodiversity features in conservation planning, but the extent to which SDMs are used in conservation planning is unclear....
Article
b>1. Active engagement with practitioners is a crucial component of model-based decision-making in conservation management; it can assist with data acquisition, improve models and help narrow the 'knowing-doing' gap. 2. We worked with practitioners of one of the worst invasive species in Australia, the cane toad Rhinella marina , to revise a model...
Article
Aim The ‘two sides of the same coin’ hypothesis posits that biological traits that predispose species to extinction and invasion lie on opposite ends of a continuum. Conversely, anthropogenic factors may have similar effects on extinction and invasion risk. We test these two hypotheses using data on more than 1000 reptile species. Location Global....
Article
Full-text available
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling can be a highly sensitive method for detecting aquatic taxa; however, the cost-efficiency of this technique relative to traditional methods has not been rigorously assessed. We show how methods that account for imperfect and stochastic detection can be used to (i) determine the optimal allocation of survey effort w...
Article
Studies of realized niche shifts in alien species typically ignore the potential effects of intraspecific niche variation and different invaded-range environments on niche lability. We incorporate our detailed knowledge of the native-range source populations and global introduction history of the delicate skink (Lampropholis delicata) to examine in...
Article
Full-text available
The impact of an invasive species depends upon the extent of area across which it ultimately spreads. A powerful strategy for limiting impact, then, is to limit spread, and this can most easily be achieved by managing or reinforcing natural barriers to spread. Using a simulation model, we show that rapid evolutionary increases in dispersal can rend...
Article
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Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling is prone to both false positive and false negative errors. We review statistical methods to account for such errors in the analysis of eDNA data, and use simulations to compare the performance of different modelling approaches. Our simulations illustrate that even low false positive rates can produce biased estimat...
Article
Full-text available
Effective management of alien species requires detecting populations in the early stages of invasion. Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling can detect aquatic species at relatively low densities, but few studies have directly compared detection probabilities of eDNA sampling with those of traditional sampling methods. We compare the ability of a tradit...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive predators can cause population declines in native prey species, but empirical evidence linking declines of native predators to invasive prey is relatively rare. Here, we document declines in an Australian freshwater crocodile Crocodylus johnstoni population following invasion of a toxic prey species, the cane toad Rhinella marina. Thirty-f...
Article
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We document the successful establishment of a European newt (Lissotriton vulgaris) in south-eastern Australia, the first recorded case of a caudate species establishing beyond its native geographic range in the southern hemisphere. Field surveys in south-eastern Australia detected L. vulgaris at six sites, including four sites where the species had...
Article
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co-occurrence patterns to quantify relative habitat breadth in terrestrial vertebrates. Ecosphere 5(12): Abstract. The breadth of habitats that a species uses may determine its vulnerability to environmental change, with habitat specialists at greater risk than generalists. To test that hypothesis, we need a valid index of habitat specialization. E...
Article
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A primary goal of ecology is to understand the fundamental processes underlying the geographic distributions of species. Two major strands of ecology—habitat modelling and community ecology—approach this problem differently. Habitat modellers often use species distribution models (SDMs) to quantify the relationship between species’ and their enviro...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic climate change is a key threat to global biodiversity. To inform strategic actions aimed at conserving biodiversity as climate changes, conservation planners need early warning of the risks faced by different species. The IUCN Red List criteria for threatened species are widely acknowledged as useful risk assessment tools for informin...
Article
The microclimate experienced by organisms is determined by local weather conditions. Yet the environmental data available for predicting the effect of climate on the distribution and abundance of organisms is typically in the form of long-term average monthly climate measured at standardized heights above the ground. Here we demonstrate how hourly...
Article
The physiological costs of living in seawater likely influenced the secondary evolutionary transitions to ma-rine life in tetrapods. However, these costs are alleviated for species that commute between the land and the sea, because terrestrial habitats can provide frequent access to fresh water. Here, we investigate how differences in the ecology a...
Article
Full-text available
Background Climatic oscillations throughout the Quaternary had profound effects on temperate biodiversity, but the extent of Quaternary climate change was more severe in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere than in the southern hemisphere. We sought to determine whether this geographic disparity differentially influenced the timing of intra...
Data
Appendix S1. Raw data on the age of species, based on oldest intraspecific diversification events as revealed by molecular phylogenies. The Table shows Species, Hemisphere (N: northern, S: southern), Latitude (below 40°, above 40°, or in both areas), Age (millions of years), and corresponding references.
Article
Full-text available
In 2008, the IUCN threat status of the Asian tapir (Tapirus indicus) was reclassified from 'vulnerable' to 'endangered'. The latest distribution map from the IUCN Red List suggests that the tapirs' native range is becoming increasingly fragmented in Peninsular Malaysia, but distribution data collected by local researchers suggest a more extensive g...