Reena Walker

Reena Walker
University of Idaho | UID · Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Sciences

Bachelor of Arts

About

5
Publications
1,467
Reads
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57
Citations
Introduction
I study the causes and consequences of animal behavior in complex environments. Currently, I am investigating how physiological constraints of body size shape the behavior of large mammals by using landscape-level experimental techniques and modeling approaches. I completed my undergraduate degree at Brown University in 2017. Previously, I have worked on projects studying the shifting continental distribution of flora in response to changing climate, elk response to catastrophic fire events, prairie dog population dynamics after plague outbreaks, and large carnivore behavioral ecology in Botswana.
Additional affiliations
August 2018 - May 2022
University of Idaho
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
August 2018 - May 2022
University of Idaho
Field of study
  • Wildlife Sciences
September 2012 - May 2017
Brown University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Size‐structured differences in resource use stabilize species coexistence in animal communities, but what behavioral mechanisms underpin these niche differences? Behavior is constrained by morphological and physiological traits that scale allometrically with body size, yet the degree to which behaviors exhibit allometric scaling remains unclear; em...
Article
Full-text available
Patterns of food sharing in collectively hunting species are likely to influence social dynamics and evolution. Despite this, little is known about competition within social groups at carcasses and other food sources, making the social drivers and implications of food sharing difficult to assess. We quantified carcass access and feeding behavior in...
Article
Full-text available
Dangerous terrain As climate change leads to regions of the world becoming increasingly uninhabitable, unregulated human migration is likely to increase. Migrants often traverse dangerous terrain, and the environmental conditions they encounter when exposed can be deadly. Campbell-Staton et al . used an approach commonly used to predict spatially e...
Article
Full-text available
In despotically driven animal societies, one or a few individuals tend to have a disproportionate influence on group decision-making and actions. However, global communication allows each group member to assess the relative strength of preferences for different options among their group-mates. Here, we investigate collective decisions by free-rangi...

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