Reed Ojala-Barbour

Reed Ojala-Barbour
Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife | WDFW · Science Division

Masters of Environmental Studies

About

21
Publications
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228
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (21)
Technical Report
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This peer-reviewed report describes the results of an 11-year study addressing potential forest practices effects on headwater stream biota. A special emphasis on amphibians, water temperatures and other important elements are included.
Article
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Polylepis forest, historically widespread throughout high elevations of the central and northern Andes, now remain only in discontinuous small patches. An expanding agricultural frontier, along with other anthropogenic pressures, imperils these remnants through further isolation and loss of habitat quality. Using two grids of live traps we compared...
Article
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We describe the eggs, oviposition site, and pre-hatching development of the Olympic Torrent Salamander (Rhyacotriton olympicus) for the first time. We made field observations before oviposition and continued them until the site washed out. We also reared an egg to hatching in the laboratory to allow us to describe early development. Oviposition is...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Van Dyke’s salamander (Plethodon vandykei), a lungless species endemic to Washington State, is one of seven stream-associated amphibian species designated under the Forests and Fish Agreement. Consideration of seven stream-associated amphibian species known to occur in or along headwater streams was one of many considerations during Agreement negot...
Article
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The Andes Mountains particularly the forests along the mid-elevations of their eastern and western slopes, are a hotspot of biodiversity (high numbers of species and endemics). Among mammals, rodents are a priority group for study in the Tropical Andes given their high diversity and often relatively small geographic ranges. Here, we use DNA barcodi...
Article
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We describe a new species of climbing rat of the genus Rhipidomys based on cranial and external morphology, morphometrics, and phylogenetic analyses of cytochrome b gene. This taxon was compared with species of Rhipidomys present in Ecuador, principally R. latimanus, which is a closely related species based on molecular analysis, and with several s...
Article
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In this study we present the results of inventory efforts of non-volant mammals in Sangay National Park (SNP), one of the least studied regions of Ecuador. We conducted inventories at 9 locations between December 2010 and June 2015 along a gradient of elevations between 1.300 and 3.650 m. To document the presence of non-volant mammals we used captu...
Article
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We describe Pristimantis tinguichaca sp. nov., a member of the Pristimantis unistrigatus species group, from the cloud forests of Sangay National Park located on the eastern slopes of the Andes in southeastern Ecuador. The new species was collected in cloud forests and cattle pastures at 2,750–2,830 m elevation. It differs from other members of the...
Article
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Registramos por primera vez la presencia de la rata invasora Rattus rattus en Sardinayacu, dentro del Parque Nacional Sangay, al sureste de Ecuador. Esta área protegida presenta bosque húmedo prístino (alejado de la presencia humana) en la Cordillera Oriental de Los Andes. La información presentada se basa en un ejemplar recolectado en la localidad...
Article
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The 4 known species of northern shrew-opossums, Caenolestes (Paucituberculata: Caenolestidae), are restricted to the northern Andes of South America. Five specimens of a new species of Caenolestes were collected in Sangay National Park on the eastern slopes of the Andes in Ecuador. Review of museum specimens revealed 6 additional specimens of this...
Cover Page
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Caenolestes sangay. Photo by Jorge Brito
Article
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The tropical Andes and Amazon are among the richest regions of endemism for mammals, and each has given rise to extensive in situ radiations. Various animal lineages have radiated ex situ after colonizing one of these regions from the other: Amazonian clades of dendrobatid frogs and passerine birds may have Andean ancestry, and transitions from the...
Conference Paper
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Entre 2011 y 2012 se realizaron colecciones de mamíferos pequeños no voladores en el Parque Nacional Sangay, Morona Santiago, Ecuador. Las estribaciones orientales de los Andes, en lo que concierne a mamíferos pequeños entre los 1 000 y 3 000 m de altitud existe una carencia casi total de información, pese a que numerosos inventarios y colecciones...
Article
Full-text available
Nests are described for Thomasomys aureus and T. paramorum in a high Andean forest in northern Ecuador. Nests of T. aureus were found in the tree canopy to 6 and 7 m in height andthose for T. paramorum were located under the roots from 15 cm to 1.5 m above the surface. Se describe los nidos de Thomasomys aureus y T. paramorum en un bosque alto andi...
Data
Thesubalpinetropicalrainforestthatoccursatelevationsgreaterthan3,000minVenezuela,ColombiaandnorthernEcuadoristhreatenedbyconversiontoagricultureandremovaloffirewood.TheseforestswithhistoricallydensestandsofPolylepishavebeengreatlyreducedordegraded,yettheycontainamongthehighestdiversitiesofterrestrialsmallmammalsintheworld.Ourstudyisthefirsttoexamin...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Estudiar la filogeografía y filogenia de los micromamíferos en el Ecuador y así determinar las unidades de conservación apropiadas para cada taxón o grupo objeto de estudio. Delimitar las especies mediante el uso de taxonomía integrativa, morfología, genética y aspectos ecológicos.