Reed Noss

Reed Noss
Florida Institute for Conservation Science

PhD, Wildlife Ecology, University of Florida

About

261
Publications
147,623
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
27,800
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2002 - July 2017
University of Central Florida
Position
  • Professor
August 2002 - present
Position
  • Provost's Distinguised Research Professor
Description
  • Presently teach Conservation Biology, Ecosystems of Florida, and Field Ornithology
December 1999 - present
Conservation Science, Inc. and Florida Institute for Conservation Science
Position
  • Chief Scientist
Education
August 1984 - May 1988
University of Florida
Field of study
  • Wildlife Ecology
September 1976 - May 1979
University of Tennessee
Field of study
  • Ecology
January 1973 - June 1975
University of Dayton
Field of study
  • Biology and Health Education (emphasis on environmental education)

Publications

Publications (261)
Article
Full-text available
Increasing natural disturbances in conifer forests worldwide complicate political decisions about appropriate land management. In particular, allowing insects to kill trees without intervention has intensified public debate over the dual roles of strictly protected areas to sustain ecosystem services and to conserve biodiversity. Here we show that...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity hotspots are conservation priorities. We identify the North American Coastal Plain (NACP) as a global hotspot based on the classic definition, a region with > 1500 endemic plant species and > 70% habitat loss. This region has been bypassed in prior designations due to misconceptions and myths about its ecology and history. These fallac...
Article
Full-text available
Many species listed under the US Endangered Species Act (ESA) face continuing threats and will require intervention to address those threats for decades. These species, which have been termed conservation-reliant, pose a challenge to the ESA's mandate for recovery of self-sustaining populations. Most references to conservation-reliant species by fe...
Article
Full-text available
Species face many threats, including accelerated climate change, sea level rise, and conversion and degradation of habitat from human land uses. Vulnerability assessments and prioritization protocols have been proposed to assess these threats, often in combination with information such as species rarity; ecological, evolutionary or economic value;...
Article
Full-text available
SHOULD CONSERVATION TARGETS, such as the proportion of a region to be placed in protected areas, be socially acceptable from the start? Or should they be based unapologetically on the best available science and expert opinion, then address issues of practicality later? Such questions strike to the philosophical core of conservation. Ambitious targe...
Preprint
Full-text available
Comprehensive biodiversity assessments play an essential role in strengthening global and national conservation strategies. The recently-announced US National Nature Assessment provides a unique opportunity to bridge the gap between research and conservation practice and communicate the extent of the US biodiversity crisis to the public. Recent glo...
Article
Full-text available
Free-roaming domestic cats (i.e., cats that are owned or unowned and are considered ‘at large’) are globally distributed non-native species that have marked impacts on biodiversity and human health. Despite clear scientific evidence of these impacts, free-roaming cats are either unmanaged or managed using scientifically unsupported and ineffective...
Article
Full-text available
Historically, grasslands with limited tree presence were embedded in a matrix of predominantly open oak and pine forests in the eastern United States. These open ecosystems mostly have been lost to other land uses, particularly agriculture, and also to closed forests under fire exclusion because frequent surface fire prevents tree encroachment. We...
Article
Full-text available
Assemblages of large mammal species play a disproportionate role in the structure and composition of natural habitats. Loss of these assemblages destabilizes natural systems, while their recovery can restore ecological integrity. Here we take an ecoregion-based approach to identify landscapes that retain their historically present large mammal asse...
Article
Full-text available
Global targets for the percentage area of land protected, such as 30% by 2030, have gained increasing prominence, but both their scientific basis and likely effectiveness have been questioned. As with emissions‐reduction targets based on desired climate outcomes, percentage‐protected targets combine values and science by estimating the area over wh...
Article
Full-text available
The unfolding crises of mass extinction and climate change call for urgent action in response. To limit biodiversity losses and avert the worst effects of climate disruption, we must greatly expand nature protection while simultaneously downsizing and transforming human systems. The conservation initiative Nature Needs Half (or Half Earth), calling...
Article
Full-text available
Because resources are finite, conservation practices can be based on shortcuts (i.e., a quicker way to a desired outcome). For example, indicator species are often used as a shortcut to justify conservation at greater organizational levels (i.e., communities, ecosystems, landscapes). Conversely, "coarse-filter" approaches to protect landscapes are...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The unglaciated southeastern United States is a biodiversity hotspot, with a disproportionate amount of this biodiversity concentrated in grasslands. Like most hotspots, the Southeast is also threatened by human activities, with the total reduction of southeastern grasslands estimated as 90 percent (upwards to 100 percent for some types) and with m...
Article
Full-text available
Despite its successes, the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA) has proven challenging to implement due to funding limitations, workload backlog, and other problems. As threats to species survival intensify and as more and more species come under threat, the need for the ESA and similar conservation laws and policies in other countries to function eff...
Article
Full-text available
There has been much recent interest in the concept of rewilding as a tool for nature conservation, but also confusion over the idea, which has in turn limited its utility. We outline a unified definition and a series of ten guiding principles for rewilding, drawing on a global advisory group of rewilding experts. These were developed through a surv...
Article
Full-text available
Global sustainability agendas focus primarily on halting deforestation, yet the biodiversity crisis resulting from the degradation of remaining forests is going largely unnoticed. Forest degradation occurs through the loss of key ecological structures, such as dying trees and deadwood, even in the absence of deforestation. One of the main drivers o...
Article
Full-text available
Extinction rates are expected to increase during the Anthropocene. Current extinction rates of plants and many animals remain unknown. This study represents the first effort to quantify extinctions among the vascular flora of North America north of Mexico since European settlement. We compiled data on apparently extinct species by querying plant co...
Article
Full-text available
Expansion of the global protected‐area network has been proposed as a strategy to address threats from accelerating climate change and species extinction. A key step in increasing the effectiveness of such expansion is understanding how novel threats to biodiversity from climate change alter concepts such as rewilding, which have underpinned many p...
Article
Full-text available
Traffic noise is known to negatively affect many wildlife species by interfering with foraging behavior. Frogs often lay their eggs in roadside ditches because they are predator-free, but it is possible that traffic noise could reduce the survival and fitness of tadpoles, creating an ecological trap. In a series of lab experiments, we tested whethe...
Chapter
Full-text available
I am fortunate to have had wild places close to home for most of my life, places to which I could escape from the nerve-shattering madness of civilization. Woods, creeks, ponds, old fields, pastures, abandoned limestone quarries—all places that were damaged to varying degrees by humans but in which people do not now have a dominating presence. None...
Article
Full-text available
Bastin et al .’s estimate (Reports, 5 July 2019, p. 76) that tree planting for climate change mitigation could sequester 205 gigatonnes of carbon is approximately five times too large. Their analysis inflated soil organic carbon gains, failed to safeguard against warming from trees at high latitudes and elevations, and considered afforestation of s...
Article
Full-text available
Agricultural development was the major contributor to South America's designation as the continent with the highest rates of forest loss from 2000-2012. As the apex predator in the Neotropics, jaguars (Panthera onca) are dependent on forest cover but the species' response to habitat fragmentation in heterogeneous agricultural landscapes has not bee...
Article
Full-text available
The Global Deal for Nature (GDN) is a time-bound, science-driven plan to save the diversity and abundance of life on Earth. Pairing the GDN and the Paris Climate Agreement would avoid catastrophic climate change, conserve species, and secure essential ecosystem services. New findings give urgency to this union: Less than half of the terrestrial rea...
Article
Those of us who grew up or have spent much time in eastern North America know how special it is to visit a remnant patch of old‐growth forest. Even better is to discover one of these relicts on our own. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Chapter
Full-text available
An overview of subtropical grasslands in south-central Florida, description of semi-native grasslands in the region, and results of 10 year experiment on fire seasonality, nutritive addition, and grazing in semi-native grasslands of the region.
Article
Full-text available
The umbrella species concept posits that protection of a single, wide-ranging species may confer protection to a large number of sympatric species. Due to their large home ranges, widespread distribution in the Mesoamerican Biodiversity Hotspot (MBH), and status as the focal species of numerous conservation initiatives, the jaguar Panthera onca is...
Book
Reviewing fossil evidence, Norida is home to many ecosystems and species that depend on frequent fire to exist. In this book, Reed Noss discusses the essential role of fire in generating biodiversity and offers best practices for using fire to keep the region's ecosystems healthy and resilient. Reviewing fossil evidence, Noss shows that fire has be...
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing controversy over logging the ancient Białowieża Forest in Poland symbolizes a global problem for policies and management of the increasing proportion of the earth's intact forest that is subject to post-disturbance logging. We review the extent of, and motivations for, post-disturbance logging in protected and unprotected forests globally....
Article
Full-text available
Roads create many challenges for conservation, and amphibians are particularly vulnerable to their negative effects. This experiment evaluates the impact that traffic noise has on amphibian populations, specifically anurans (frogs and toads). It is thought that traffic noise may act to reduce population abundances; however, it is difficult to disen...
Article
Roadside Animal Detection Systems (RADS) aim to reduce the frequency of wildlife-vehicle collisions. Unlike fencing and wildlife passages, RADS do not attempt to keep animals off the road; rather, they attempt to modify driver behavior by detecting animals near the road and warning drivers with flashing signs. A RADS was installed in Big Cypress Na...
Article
Full-text available
The establishment of protected areas is a critical strategy for conserving biodiversity. Key policy directives like the Aichi targets seek to expand protected areas to 17% of the earth's land surface, with calls by some conservation biologists for much more. However, in places such as the USA, Germany and Australia, attempts to increase protected a...
Article
Full-text available
Roads and their associated effects (road-kill, pollution, etc.) have a largely negative impact on animals, especially amphibians, but not all species are affected to the same degree. Variation in life histories may explain some of these differences. Here, we examine how abundance of anuran species in roadside habitats is correlated with an aspect o...
Article
Full-text available
If we want a whole Earth, Nature Needs Half: a response to Büscher et al. - Philip Cafaro, Tom Butler, Eileen Crist, Paul Cryer, Eric Dinerstein, Helen Kopnina, Reed Noss, John Piccolo, Bron Taylor, Carly Vynne, Haydn Washington
Article
Full-text available
We performed a rapid global assessment of the availability and robustness of conservation strategies for ecoregions. In some cases this involved assessment of large regions composed of multiple ecoregions. We found ecoregion and regional conservation strategies through internet searches, guided by Google Search Engine, Google Scholar, literature ci...
Article
Full-text available
We assess progress toward the protection of 50% of the terrestrial biosphere to address the species-extinction crisis and conserve a global ecological heritage for future generations. Using a map of Earth's 846 terrestrial ecoregions, we show that 98 ecoregions (12%) exceed Half Protected; 313 ecoregions (37%) fall short of Half Protected but have...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Centres of endemism have received much attention from evolutionists, biogeographers, ecologists and conservationists. Climatic stability is often cited as a major reason for the occurrences of these geographic concentrations of species which are not found anywhere else. The proposed linkage between endemism and climatic stability raise...
Article
Full-text available
A reply to ‘Half-Earth or Whole Earth? Radical ideas for conservation, and their implication' Büscher et al.'s (2016) recent article ‘Half-Earth or Whole Earth? Radical ideas for conservation, and their implications’ raises some important issues for conservation, but it paints a misleading picture of the Nature Needs Half movement. Nature Needs Ha...
Article
Full-text available
Research
Full-text available
White-paper on Florida biodiversity under a changing climate
Article
Full-text available
Available habitat within a landscape is often more limited for specialist species than for generalists. Therefore, specialists are potentially more vulnerable to extinction. The goal of our study was to better understand the ephemeral wetland habitat associations of specialist and generalist amphibians within a longleaf pine landscape in the southe...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: A Roadside Animal Detection System (RADS) was installed in January 2012 along Highway 41 through Big Cypress National Preserve in Florida, USA in an attempt to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions. The system uses flashing warning signs to alert drivers when a large animal is near the road. However, we suspected that the RADS warning sign...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing natural disturbances in conifer forests worldwide complicate political decisions about appropriate land management. In particular, allowing insects to kill trees without intervention has intensified public debate over the dual roles of strictly protected areas to sustain ecosystem services and to conserve biodiversity. Here we show that...
Article
Full-text available
This article is a comment article to Matlack GR. 2013. Reassessment of the use of fire as a management tool in deciduous forests of eastern North America. Conservation Biology 27:916–926. These articles have no abstract.
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity hotspots are conservation priorities. We identify the North American Coastal Plain (NACP) as a global hotspot based on the classic definition, a region with > 1500 endemic plant species and > 70% habitat loss. This region has been bypassed in prior designations due to misconceptions and myths about its ecology and history. These fallac...