Reed T. DeAngelis

Reed T. DeAngelis
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | UNC · Department of Sociology and Carolina Population Center

M.S. in Sociology

About

19
Publications
8,354
Reads
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148
Citations
Introduction
I’m a doctoral student in sociology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and a biosocial trainee at the Carolina Population Center. I study the social stratification of stress-coping, health, and aging, with a focus on racialized and socioeconomic inequities.
Additional affiliations
July 2017 - August 2017
University of Texas at San Antonio
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Introduction to Social Research Methods
Education
May 2019 - May 2023
Carolina Population Center
Field of study
  • Biosocial
August 2018 - May 2023
August 2015 - December 2017
University of Texas at San Antonio
Field of study
  • Sociology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
At all levels of socioeconomic status, Black Americans can expect to live shorter and sicker lives than their White counterparts. This study advances the perspective that anti-Black stigma from Whites precludes Blacks from reaping the full health rewards of higher status, particularly within the context of neighborhoods. To test this hypothesis, I...
Article
Full-text available
This study addresses two questions. First, why do Black Americans exhibit worse health outcomes than White Americans even at higher levels of socioeconomic status (SES)? Second, are diminished health returns to higher status concentrated among Black Americans with darker skin color? Novel hypotheses are tested with biosocial panel data from a natio...
Article
Full-text available
This research note provides new evidence consistent with systemic anti-Black racism in police killings across the United States. Data come from the Mapping Police Violence Database (2013-2021). I calculate race-specific odds and probabilities that victims of police killings exhibited mental illness, were armed with a weapon, or attempted to flee th...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter, I apply a biopsychosocial lens to stress and coping processes among working-age parents. I demonstrate that parents with more children in the home simultaneously exhibit fewer physician-diagnosed illnesses but shorter telomeres, a marker of accelerated cellular aging. Moreover, the association between children in the home and short...
Article
Full-text available
This research note advances the religious coping literature by testing whether belief in an evil world conditions the stress-moderating role of scripture reading. Hypotheses are tested with original data from a survey of Black, Hispanic, and White American churchgoers from South Texas (2017-2018; n = 1,115). Our findings show that reading scripture...
Article
Full-text available
Unfortunately, due to an error upon submission of this article, the article was published with an incomplete author group. Dr. Katherine L. Friedman was not listed as third author of this paper. With this correction Dr. Katherine L. Friedman has been added to the author group.
Article
Full-text available
Does childrearing affect the biological functioning of parents? To address this question, we analyze cross-sectional survey and biomarker data from Vanderbilt University's Nashville Stress and Health Study, a probability sample of non-Hispanic white and black working-age adults from Davidson County, Tennessee (2011-2014; n = 1,252). Multivariable r...
Article
Full-text available
Population health scientists have largely overlooked anticipatory stressors and how different groups of people experience and cope with anticipatory stress. I address these gaps by examining black-white differences in the associations between an important anticipatory stressor—goal-striving stress (GSS)—and several measures of psychophysiology. Hyp...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives. To explore (a) how perceptions of personal and divine control over one's sleep schedule combine in distinct ways to predict sleep quality among college students, and (b) whether health behaviors and psychological distress mediate the associations between perceptions of sleep control and sleep quality. Methods. We surveyed 1,251 studen...
Article
Full-text available
Does religious involvement (i.e., attendance and salience) mitigate the association between combat casualty exposure and sleep disturbance among US military veterans? To address this question, we analyze cross-sectional survey data from the public-use version of the 2011 Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Military Personnel. Results from mul...
Article
Full-text available
Although several studies have documented an inverse association between stressful events and sleep quality, much less is known about the factors that might moderate or buffer against the adverse effects of psychosocial stress on sleep. Building on previous research, we employ national cross-sectional survey data from the 2017 Baylor Religion Survey...
Article
Full-text available
This study develops and tests a theory of scriptural coping. Using elements from hermeneutic theory as our guide, we contend that (1) specific life exigencies will increase the likelihood of someone turning to scripture for relevant insights, and (2) reading scripture for relevant insights will moderate associations between exigencies and psycholog...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines whether dimensions of religious involvement (i.e., perceived divine control, private religious practices, and religious social integration) buffer associations between aspiration strain and mental health outcomes (i.e., psychological distress, loneliness, and optimism). We also test three-way interactions to determine whether th...
Article
Although numerous empirical studies show that religious involvement is associated with better health and longer life expectancies, researchers have virtually ignored possible links between religious involvement and sleep. To spark greater attention to this important and understudied area of sleep research, we review previous population-based studie...
Thesis
Full-text available
Scholars in the fields of criminology and epidemiology have linked personal experiences with thwarted life goals – i.e. aspiration strain – to increased risk of criminal and suicidal behavior, as well as to diminished mental and physical health. Very little is known, however, about the ways people cope with aspiration strain. To address this gap, m...
Article
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Several decades of scholarly research have revealed the significant toll of discrimination experiences on the well-being of African Americans. Given these findings, investigators have become increasingly interested in uncovering any potential resources made available to African Americans for mitigating the psychosocial strains of discrimination. Th...
Article
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A formidable body of literature suggests that numerous dimensions of religious involvement can facilitate productive coping. One common assumption in this field is that religious worldviews provide overarching frameworks of meaning by which to positively reinterpret stressors. The current study explicitly tests this assumption by examining whether...
Article
Full-text available
No study has investigated whether personal religiousness could modulate goal-striving stress. To address this gap in the literature, the current study tests whether beliefs in divine control moderate the associations between goal-striving stress and self-concept (i.e. self-esteem and mastery). I analyze cross-sectional data from Vanderbilt Universi...
Article
Full-text available
Prior research suggests that religiosity, especially public religious participation, is related to greater volunteerism. However, less is known about religious transmission across the life course, in particular whether and how religiosity in childhood is linked to later life volunteerism. This study investigates a sample of emerging adults in South...

Network

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
This collaborative project explores associations between measures of high-effort coping (e.g., goal-striving stress, John Henryism) and psychophysiological health, particularly among Black Americans. Data sources include the Nashville Stress and Health Study, Jackson Heart Study, and National Survey of American Life.
Project
This project operationalizes historical redlining as a form of structural racism and social determinant of health. Recently digitized federal redlining maps are merged with population health studies to determine the neighborhood-level mechanisms linking historical redlining initiatives to contemporary population health disparities.
Project
This collaborative project explores the multifaceted nature of religious involvement in the stress and coping process. Studies explore beliefs about God, scripture reading practices, and religious social integration as key moderators of psychosocial stressors. Studies also consider subgroup variations in the stress-moderating role of religion, particularly variations by race, educational attainment, and subjective status.