Rebecca Bunn

Rebecca Bunn
Western Washington University | WWU · Department of Environmental Science

20.4
 · 
Doctor of Philosophy
About
17
Research items
1,981
Reads
450
Citations
Introduction
Rebecca Bunn currently works at the Department of Environmental Sciences, Western Washington University. Rebecca does research in Ecology, Microbiology, Mycology and Applied Statistics.
Research Experience
Sep 2010 - Apr 2016
Western Washington University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
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Research
Research items (17)
Article
Full-text available
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are not decomposers, yet these fungi have been found exploring leaf litter in both tropical and temperate forests within a few months of litter fall. Why would these fungi be exploring leaf litter and what are the implications for the plants they associate with?
Answer
Not even sharing with you, a colleague that contributed to the database? That seems odd and potentially (hopefully) an isolated case. One idea to avoid this situation in the future is to hold the data in a ''shared space" where all contributers have access to and ownership of the full dataset.
Article
Plants interact simultaneously with each other and with soil biota, yet the relative importance of competition vs. plant–soil feedback (PSF) on plant performance is poorly understood. Using a meta‐analysis of 38 published studies and 150 plant species, we show that effects of interspecific competition (either growing plants with a competitor or sin...
Article
Revegetation following dam removal projects may depend on recovery of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal communities, which perform valuable ecosystem functions. This study assessed the availability and function of AM and EM fungi for plants colonizing dewatered reservoirs following a dam removal project on the Elwha River,...
Article
Divergent hypotheses have been proposed that suggest plant invasions either enhance or degrade the mutualism between plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, but their relative support remains unknown.We conducted a meta-analysis using 67 publications, involving 70 native and 55 invasive plant species to assess support for the enhanced mutuali...
Chapter
The mycorrhizal symbiosis is an ancient interaction between plants and fungi, the basis of the symbiosis being enhanced nutrient uptake for the host plant and a carbon source for the fungus. In this chapter we explore the potential for mycorrhizae to enhance plant survival and growth in extreme environments, specifically via enhanced nutrient uptak...
Article
Full-text available
Controlled experiments show that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can increase competitiveness of exotic plants, potentially increasing invasion success. We surveyed AMF abundance and community composition in Centaurea stoebe and Potentilla recta invasions in the western USA to assess whether patterns were consistent with mycorrhizal-mediated inv...
Data
Table S1. Native plant species sampled in Montana Table S2. Soil abiotic factors Table S3. OTU accession numbers Table S4. OTU relative read numbers.
Data
Figure S1. OTU accumulation curve Figure S2. Neighbor net of fungal OTUs Figure S3. Sample effort curve
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Invasive species pose a serious threat to ecosystems by altering not only plant community composition, but also ecosystem processes. Arbuscular mycorrhizae, which can mediate plant-plant interactions through host-specific benefits, are an important factor in the success of at least some, if not all, invasive plants. On...
Article
Biotic interactions can affect the distribution of species across environmental gradients, and as air and soil temperatures increase, plant community response may depend on interactions with symbionts. We measured the effect of elevated soil temperatures on mycorrhizal function and on the response of both plant and fungal symbionts, using fungal in...
Article
Mycorrhizae are common plant-fungal symbioses occurring in most land plants. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the distribution of arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) in extreme environments. We surveyed for the presence of AM in thermal sites in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) where soils are characterized by extreme pHs, elevated temperatures...
Article
Field and laboratory column experiments were performed to assess the effect of elevated pH and reduced ionic strength on the mobilization of natural colloids in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated aquifer sediment. The field experiments were conducted as natural gradient injections of groundwater amended by sodium hydroxide additions. The laboratory exper...
Article
Full-text available
The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbations, (2) assessing the relative transport of mobilized colloids and the...
Article
Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloids were co-injected into sewage-contaminated and uncontaminated zones of an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, and their transport was monitored over distances up to 6 m in three arrays. After deposition, the attached PRD1 and silica colloids were mobilized by three different chemical perturbations (...
Article
The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbations, (2) assessing the relative transport of mobilized colloids and the...