Rebecca Asch

Rebecca Asch
East Carolina University | ECU · Department of Biology

26.32
 · 
Ph.D.

About

31
Publications
12,423
Reads
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1,586
Citations
Research Experience
January 2017 - present
East Carolina University
Position
  • Assistant Professor
October 2016 - November 2016
University of California, San Diego
Position
  • Visiting Scholar
September 2016 - December 2016
University of Texas at Austin
Position
  • Research Fellow
Education
September 2007 - September 2013
University of California, San Diego/Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Field of study
  • Biological Oceanography
September 2002 - February 2006
University of Rhode Island
Field of study
  • Biological Oceanography
September 1996 - May 2000
Smith College
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
The oceanic convergence zone in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre acts to accumulate floating marine debris, including plastic fragments of various sizes. Little is known about the ecological consequences of pelagic plastic accumulation. During the 2009 Scripps Environmental Accumulation of Plastics Expedition (SEAPLEX), we investigated whether me...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has prompted an earlier arrival of spring in numerous ecosystems. It is uncertain whether such changes are occurring in Eastern Boundary Current Upwelling ecosystems, because these regions are subject to natural decadal climate variability, and regional climate models predict seasonal delays in upwelling. To answer this question, the...
Article
Full-text available
Substantial interannual variability in marine fish recruitment (i.e., the number of young fish entering a fishery each year) has been hypothesized to be related to whether the timing of fish spawning matches that of seasonal plankton blooms. Environmental processes that control the phenology of blooms, such as stratification, may differ from those...
Article
Aim Most projections of how climate change will affect species distributions and phenology are based on a species’ most conspicuous life stage. However, not all life stages are equally sensitive to temperature. Among fishes, spawning adults often have narrower thermal tolerances than other life stages and may constrain population responses to clima...
Article
Full-text available
Photosynthesis fuels marine food webs, yet differences in fish catch across globally distributed marine ecosystems far exceed differences in net primary production (NPP). We consider the hypothesis that ecosystem-level variations in pelagic and benthic energy flows from phytoplankton to fish, trophic transfer efficiencies, and fishing effort can qu...
Chapter
Phenology (the study of how climate and weather affect seasonal, ecological cycles) has been understudied in marine ecosystems despite its vital role in mediating interspecific interactions and promoting ecosystem services. Seasonal mismatches between larval fishes and their prey can result in low larval survival and poor fisheries recruitment. Cli...
Article
Aim: This study examined phytoplankton blooms on a global scale, with the intention of describing patterns of bloom timing and size, the effect of bloom timing on the size of blooms, and time series trends in bloom characteristics. Location: Global. Methods: We used a change‐point statistics algorithm to detect phytoplankton blooms in time series...
Article
Full-text available
The increase in anthropogenic CO2 emissions over the last century has modified oceanic conditions, affecting marine ecosystems and the goods and services that they provide to society. Pacific Island countries and territories are highly vulnerable to these changes because of their strong dependence on ocean resources, high level of exposure to clima...
Article
Full-text available
Achieving the United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) results in many ecological, social, and economic consequences that are inter-related. Understanding relationships between sustainability goals and determining their interactions can help prioritize effective and efficient policy options. This paper presents a framework that integ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Achieving ocean sustainability is paramount for coastal communi es and marine industries, yet is also inextricably linked to much broader global sustainable development—including increased resilience to climate change and improved social equity—as envisioned by the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report highlights the co-bene ts fr...
Article
Full-text available
Anchovy and sardine populated productive ocean regions over hundreds of thousands of years under a naturally varying climate, and are now subject to climate change of equal or greater magnitude occurring over decades to centuries. We hypothesize that anchovy and sardine populations are limited in size by the supply of nitrogen from outside their ha...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The North Atlantic Ocean contains diverse patterns of seasonal phytoplankton blooms with distinct internal dynamics. We analyzed blooms using remotely-sensed chlorophyll a concentration data and change point statistics. The first bloom of the year began during spring at low latitudes and later in summer at higher latitudes. In regions wher...
Article
The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlights that climate change and ocean acidification are challenging the sustainable management of living marine resources (LMRs). Formal and systematic treatment of uncertainty in existing LMR projections, however, is lacking. We synthesize knowledge of how to address d...
Article
Full-text available
A large fraction of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity enters the sea, causing ocean acidification. We show that otoliths (aragonite ear bones) of young fish grown under high CO2 (low pH) conditions are larger than normal, contrary to expectation. We hypothesize that CO2 moves freely through the epithelium around the otoli...
Data
A large fraction of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity enters the sea, causing ocean acidification. We show that otoliths (aragonite ear bones) of young fish grown under high CO2 (low pH) conditions are larger than normal, contrary to expectation. We hypothesize that CO2 moves freely through the epithelium around the otoli...
Article
Full-text available
Trawling and dredging on Georges Bank (northwest Atlantic Ocean) have altered the cover of colonial epifauna, as surveyed through in situ photography. A total of 454 photographs were analyzed from areas with gravel substrate between 1994 and 2000 at depths of 40-50 m and 80-90 m. The cover of hydroids, bushy bryozoans, sponges, and tubeworms was ge...
Article
Didemnum sp. A is a colonial ascidian with rapidly expanding populations on the east and west coasts of North America. The origin of Didemum sp. A is unknown. Populations were first observed on the northeast coast of the U.S. in the late 1980s and on the west coast during the 1990s. It is currently undergoing a massive population explosion and is n...
Article
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Rhode Island, 2006. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 255-265).
Article
Full-text available
As part of the US Coral Reef Task Force's National Program to Map, Assess, Inventory, and Monitor US Coral Reef Ecosystems, a comprehensive survey of projects/programs monitoring coral reef ecosystems and related habitats (i.e., seagrass beds and mangroves) in the US Caribbean and Pacific was undertaken. Information was gathered on a total of 296 m...

Questions and Answers

Question & Answer (1)

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Climate change and climate variability are leading to shifts in the seasonal timing of fish migration and reproduction (i.e., phenology) across many ecosystems and species, with changes especially common among anadromous fishes, such as Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis). Understanding how Striped Bass will be affected by climate change is an important issue for stakeholders across the US East Coast given its use as a recreationally and commercially targeted species. Other spawning populations of this species vary their spawning migration timing with respect to seasonal temperatures. North Carolina hosts the Albemarle Sound/Roanoke River (A/R) stock, which is the southern most major spawning population of Striped Bass. Large A/R Striped Bass (>900 mm TL) have been shown to migrate long distances in the summer reaching Cape Cod, MA before overwintering offshore in the coastal waters of North Carolina and Virginia and then returning to their spawning grounds in early spring. This study’s objective is to create an ecological forecast of the timing of the Roanoke River spawning run, which can be used to determine the best time to protect large spawning females and assess the optimal timing of water releases from dams under future climate change. The study will use historical data from a Striped Bass egg survey conducted from 1960-1992 and contemporary creel survey data to model spawning migration timing as a function of river, estuarine, and coastal temperature, regional climate indices, dissolved oxygen concentration, wind speed, river flow pulse duration timing, and Striped Bass population size structure.