Rebecca K McKee

Rebecca K McKee
University of Florida | UF · Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Master of Science

About

5
Publications
1,584
Reads
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16
Citations
Introduction
I recently completed my MS at University of Georgia where I studied gopher tortoise health and population dynamics. Currently, I am a PhD student at the University of Florida where I will research the effects of invasive pythons on mammals (behavior, pop. dynamics, etc.) in the Everglades.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - July 2020
Towson University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Courses taught: General Zoology, Courses co-taught: Conservation Biology, Principles of Biology
January 2017 - June 2019
University of Georgia
Position
  • Research Assistant
January 2017 - June 2019
University of Georgia
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2020 - January 2025
University of Florida
Field of study
  • Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
January 2017 - May 2019
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Wildlife Conservation
August 2010 - May 2014
Davidson College
Field of study
  • Environmental Studies

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) have experienced declines throughout their range, and accidental mortality in crab pots is a significant conservation concern. To minimize the risk of terrapins entering crab pots, researchers have suggested the use of bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) to reduce the size of crab pot openings and thereby ex...
Article
Population manipulations such as translocation and head‐starting are increasingly used as recovery tools for chelonians. But evaluating success of individual projects can require decades of monitoring to detect population trends in these long‐lived species. Furthermore, there are often few benchmarks from stable, unmanipulated populations against w...
Article
Full-text available
Gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) are among the most commonly translocated reptiles. Waif tortoises are animals frequently of unknown origin that have been displaced from the wild and often held in human possession for various reasons and durations. Although there are risks associated with any translocation, waif tortoises are generally exclud...
Thesis
Full-text available
The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) is declining throughout its range and is among the most commonly translocated reptile species. While some risk is inherent with any translocation, waif tortoises-animals that were collected illegally or have unknown origins-are generally excluded from translocations due to concerns associated with the healt...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Limited research on reptile diets using this technique--especially snakes. Thoughts on barriers to this or tips for success?
Question
My understanding is that raccoons are still relatively small (~2lbs) when they begin to accompany their mother on foraging excursions. Presumably some larger snake species that feed on similarly sized rabbits could consume juveniles, but I have found no evidence of this in snake diet studies though. Any records I am missing?

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
In the early 1990s, a small population of gopher tortoises (n<=10) was discovered near Aiken, South Carolina, expanding the species’ known range and resulting in the creation of the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage Preserve (AGTHP). Due to the preserve’s dire need for augmentation and its isolation from other tortoise populations, the AGTHP provided the opportunity to study waif tortoise translocation without jeopardizing a viable population. Since 2006, over 280 marked tortoises have been introduced to the preserve. Our objective is to assess the outcome of this recovery effort by estimating tortoise apparent survival and evaluating the health of the surviving individuals.