Rebecca Lybrand

Rebecca Lybrand
Oregon State University | OSU · Department of Crop and Soil Science

PhD

About

33
Publications
4,933
Reads
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347
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - November 2015
The University of Arizona
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2010 - August 2014
The University of Arizona
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2007 - June 2010
University of California, Riverside
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (33)
Article
Full-text available
Deserts accumulate soluble salts from atmospheric deposition that impact human health, are a source of nutrients for organisms, and provide insight into how landscapes evolved on Earth and Mars. We quantified perchlorate, nitrate, and iodate abundances and co-occurrence in terrestrial deserts to identify fundamental controls on soluble salt deposit...
Article
Full-text available
Soils require study across semiarid ecosystems to better understand soil organic C storage and landscape evolution in water-limited environments. The objective of this research was to quantify soil morphologic development in contrasting climate–vegetation zones and landscape positions along a semiarid environmental gradient. Five ecosystems were ex...
Article
Full-text available
Processes within the critical zone-spanning groundwater to the top of the vegetation canopy-have important societal relevance and operate over broad spatial and temporal scales that often are not included in existing frameworks for ecosystem services evaluation. Here we expand the scope of ecosystem services by specifying how critical zone processe...
Article
Perchlorate is a widely studied environmental contaminant that may adversely affect human health, and whose natural occurrence has emerged as a subject of great interest. Naturally formed perchlorate has been found to co-occur with nitrate in arid environments worldwide, but the relationship is not fully understood in the desert soils of the southw...
Article
Full-text available
Freeze‐thaw is a disturbance process in cold regions where permafrost soils are becoming vulnerable to temperature fluctuations above 0°C. Freeze‐thaw alters soil physical and biogeochemical properties with implications for carbon persistence and emissions in Arctic landscapes. We examined whether different freeze‐thaw histories in two soil systems...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change in Arctic landscapes may increase freeze–thaw frequency within the active layer as well as newly thawed permafrost. Freeze-thaw is a highly disruptive process that can deform soil pores and alter the architecture of the soil pore network with varied impacts to water transport and retention, redox conditions, and microbial activity. O...
Article
Full-text available
Nutrient foraging by fungi weathers rocks by mechanical and biochemical processes. Distinguishing fungal-driven transformation from abiotic mechanisms in soil remains a challenge due to complexities within natural field environments. We examined the role of fungal hyphae in the incipient weathering of granulated basalt from a three-year field exper...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The quantification of soil redistribution rates (erosion and deposition) has been crucial for understanding erosion processes and landscape evolution in natural areas worldwide. Soil redistribution assessments have mostly focused on the effect of topography, climate, and vegetation, but few explored how soil development influences soil redistributi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The perhumid climate of the coastal temperate rainforest in SE Alaska favors high rates of mineral weathering and soil formation. The rapid melting of mountain glaciers of the region exposes vast areas of bedrock to chemical weathering and soil formation. However, little is known about the soil mineral transformation in the region. In this study, w...
Article
Macro to Nanoscale Approaches to Study Mineral Transformations at the Liquid, Organic, Biological Interface. - Odeta Qafoku, Rebecca Lybrand, Michael Schindler, Libor Kovarik, Ravi Kukkadapu, Daniel Perea, Mark Bowden
Article
Soils deliver underrecognized ecosystem services by supplying habitat for ground‐dwelling pollinators, such as wild bees and other organisms, that pollinate 80% of insect‐pollinated plants and play a critical role in securing resilient pollination provisions. Our objective is to identify soil properties of ground nesting bee nests in agricultural s...
Chapter
Weathering is the process by which a solid breaks up into its building blocks when in thermodynamic disequilibrium with the surrounding environment. Weathering plays an important role in the formation of environments that can support life, including human life. It provides long‐term control on nutrient availability in natural and agricultural ecosy...
Article
A Correlative Bimodal Surface Imaging Method to Assess Hyphae-Rock Interactions. - Volume 25 Supplement - Odeta Qafoku, Rebecca A. Lybrand, Vaithiyalingam Shutthanandan, Rachel E. Gallery, Jason C. Austin, Paul A. Schroeder, Jennifer Fedenko, Erin Rooney, Dragos G. Zaharescu
Article
Mineral Surface Transformations by Ice Nucleation - Volume 25 Supplement - Daniel Veghte, Rebecca Lybrand, Swarup China, Dragos Zaharescu, Odeta Qafoku
Article
Full-text available
Mineral weathering is a balanced interplay among physical, chemical, and biological processes. Fundamental knowledge gaps exist in characterizing the biogeochemical mechanisms that transform microbe-mineral interfaces at submicron scales, particularly in complex field systems. Our objective was to develop methods targeting the nanoscale by using hi...
Article
Full-text available
Climate-driven changes in carbon (C) cycling of forested ecosystems have the potential to alter long-term C sequestration and the global C balance. Prior studies have shown that C uptake and partitioning in response to hydrologic variation are system specific, suggesting that a comprehensive assessment is required for distinct ecosystems. Many sub-...
Article
Mineral weathering transforms rock into soils that supply nutrients to ecosystems, store terrestrial carbon, and provide habitat for organisms. As a result, the mineralogy and geochemistry of soils from contrasting environments are well-studied. The primary objective of this research was to examine how climate, topography, and dust interactively co...
Article
Full-text available
Fire and pathogen-induced tree mortality are the two dominant forms of disturbance in Western U.S. montane forests. We investigated the consequences of both disturbance types on the controls of microbial activity in soils from 56 plots across a topographic gradient one year after the 2012 High Park wildfire in Colorado. Topsoil biogeochemistry, soi...
Chapter
The arid and semiarid ecosystems of the Western Range and Irrigated Region occupy large areas across the states of Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado, and Texas. These areas are largely comprised of desert and semi-desert ecosystems located on broad plateaus, plains, basins, and isolated mountain ranges...
Article
Full-text available
Soils are significant terrestrial carbon stores yet the mechanisms that stabilize organic carbon in mineral soil remain poorly constrained. Here, we identified climate and topographic controls on soil organic carbon storage along the Catalina Critical Zone Observatory that spans a significant range in mean annual temperature (>10 °C) and mean annua...
Article
Full-text available
The critical zone evolves from coupled biological, physical, and geochemical processes that we quantify here across varying climatic and topographic conditions. The specific objective of this work was to examine how climate, landscape position, and vegetation drive feldspar weathering across the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone Observatory, wh...
Article
[1] Feedbacks among vegetation dynamics, pedogenesis, and topographic development affect the “critical zone”—the living filter for Earth's hydrologic, biogeochemical, and rock/sediment cycles. Assessing the importance of such feedbacks, which may be particularly pronounced in water-limited systems, remains a fundamental interdisciplinary challenge....
Article
Granitic terrain comprises a significant area of the earth's land surface (>15%). Quantifying weathering processes involved in the transformation of granitic rock to saprolite and soil is central to understanding landscape evolution in these systems. The quantification of primary mineral composition is important for assessing subsequent mineral tra...
Article
Understanding the interactions of climate, physical erosion, chemical weathering and pedogenic processes is essential when considering the evolution of critical zone systems. Interactions among these components are particularly important to predicting how semiarid landscapes will respond to forecasted changes in precipitation and temperature under...
Article
Understanding the linkages among climate, erosion and weathering is central to quantifying pedogenesis and critical zone evolution. We approach these linkages through a combination of regional scale synthesis of climate, erosion and regolith geochemical data for upland terrain, in addition to detailed studies on climate and landscape position contr...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This project encloses a broad spectrum of soil-aquatic biogeochemistry approaches to investigate the relationship between mineral weathering and organic carbon dynamics and the export of terrestrial materials to aquatic ecosystems. Our study area is in a carbon-dense forested ecosystem of the Alaskan coastal temperate rainforest.