Rebecca Gregory

Rebecca Gregory
University of Nottingham | Notts · School of English

PhD

About

32
Publications
2,150
Reads
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7
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - March 2020
University of Nottingham
Position
  • Teaching Associate in Applied English
January 2018 - December 2018
University of Glasgow
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2016 - May 2017
University of Nottingham
Position
  • Researcher
Education
October 2013 - September 2016
University of Nottingham
Field of study
  • English

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
The Trent is England’s third longest river. Its propensity to flood has long been recognised. Indeed it is this distinguishing trait that appears to have given the river its name. In this paper, we examine how this mercurial and potentially dangerous river was understood and how its floodplain was settled in the Middle Ages. Drawing on toponomastic...
Book
Viking Nottinghamshire describes the county as it was throughout the Viking Age, through the various stages of Scandinavian settlement. It uses a range of historical evidence, including documents, place-names, artefacts and sculpture, to explore the impact and contribution the Scandinavian settlers made to the character and history of Nottinghamshi...
Chapter
This is a major new dictionary of field-names drawing on the collections of the English Place-Name Survey and the pioneering work of John Field, and on scholarly work in field-nomenclature of the last twenty years. With some 45,000 field-name attestations and nearly 2,500 headwords, it is the most comprehensive work on English field-names availabl...
Book
Digital Teaching for Linguistics re-imagines the teaching of linguistics in a digital environment. It provides both an introduction to digital pedagogy and a discussion of technologically driven teaching practices that could be applied to any field of study.
Thesis
Full-text available
Please note: the full text available from ResearchGate has had a number of images removed due to copyright restrictions. This thesis investigates the minor and field-names of twenty-two parishes in Thurgarton Wapentake, a historic division of Nottinghamshire. It investigates the agricultural history of the region, and explores the usage of Old Eng...
Cover Page
Full-text available
The Journal of the English Place-Name Society 51 (2019) was published in February 2021, edited by Paul Cavill and Rebecca Gregory. The contents page is available here, and abstracts are available on the Journal page of the English Place-Name Society website (epns.org).
Poster
Full-text available
The SNSBI spring conference returns to Nottingham for the first time since 1996. The University of Nottingham is home to the Institute for Name-Studies and has a long-standing connection with the field, housing the library and offices of the English Place-Name Society for over fifty years. The conference will open on Friday evening with a paper ‘L...
Cover Page
Full-text available
The Journal of the English Place-Name Society 50 (2018) was published in March 2019, edited by Paul Cavill and Rebecca Gregory. The contents page is available here, and abstracts are available on the Journal page of the English Place-Name Society website (epns.org).
Poster
Full-text available
Future innovations in teaching and learning will evolve where new thinking in teaching, new approaches to curriculum design and management, and new technology come together in alignment. This two-day conference brings together university teachers and educators, learning technologists, practitioners and students to share the concepts, practices and...
Article
Full-text available
The Journal of the English Place-Name Society 49 (2017) was published in October 2018, edited by Paul Cavill and Rebecca Gregory. The contents page is available here, and the print journal is available from the English Place-Name Society (see epns.org).
Poster
Full-text available
Introduction to the Staffordshire Place-Name Project, a volunteer project run by the English Place-Name Society and Institute for Name-Studies (University of Nottingham) with the Staffordshire Archives and Heritage Service. Created for display at the Cameron Lecture 2017, a biennial public lecture held at the University of Nottingham in memory of P...
Poster
Full-text available
Introduction to my AHRC-funded doctoral research project, ‘Minor and field-names of Thurgarton Wapentake, Nottinghamshire’, completed in 2016. Created for display at the Cameron Lecture 2017, a biennial public lecture held at the University of Nottingham in memory of Prof. Kenneth Cameron.
Article
Full-text available

Projects

Projects (10)
Project
The project focuses upon the relationship between historic settlements and water in order to determine how former populations saw, described and utilised the landscape. This will be conducted by primarily drawing on place-name evidence from settlements in order to study river flooding and water/land management during the period c.700-1100AD, the last major episode on record of rapid warming and weather extremes. This critical period of climate change is targeted because it offers the closest parallels for our own times, since this was when most now-occupied centres of population were first established, and when these places gained their names. This project will assess how historic place-names, archaeology, and palaeoenvironmental evidence might be effectively marshalled to map riverine landscapes during periods of rapid climate change. We will ask whether these names, laden with environmental information, in known locations still occupied today, remain valuable guides to understanding the nature of modern river flows, floodplain and wetland environments, and human responses to living with and managing water across whole river catchment basins.
Project
A project based in the School of English, University of Nottingham, that aims to develop a unique future vision of international education at distance, enabled by curricular and technological innovation.