Rebecca Gilmour

Rebecca Gilmour
Mount Royal University | MT Royal · Department of Sociology and Anthropology

PhD, McMaster University

About

19
Publications
5,207
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Citations
Introduction
Rebecca Gilmour is an Assistant Professor, in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Mount Royal University. Her work applies biomechanical methods to interpret the long-term consequences of pathological conditions, currently focussing on lived experiences and injury recovery after limb trauma in the Roman period.
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - June 2020
McMaster University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2017 - April 2018
Humber College
Position
  • Instructor
September 2017 - April 2018
University of Guelph-Humber
Position
  • Instructor
Education
September 2011 - March 2017
McMaster University
Field of study
  • Anthropology
October 2009 - October 2010
Durham University
Field of study
  • Palaeopathology
September 2004 - May 2008
Simon Fraser University
Field of study
  • Archaeology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
It was hypothesized that men and women living in the border provinces of the Roman Empire may have encountered different risks associated with their different occupations and activities. Limb bone trauma data were used to assess sex-based differences in physical hazards and evidence for fracture healing and treatment. Two hundred and ten skeletons...
Article
Objective: This study uses biomechanical data from tibiae to investigate the functional consequences of lower limb fractures. Adults with malunited fractures are hypothesized to have experienced altered mobility, indicated by asymmetric tibial cross-sectional geometries (CSG). Materials: Ninety-three adults from Roman (1st to 4th centuries CE) Anc...
Article
Objectives: Skeletal variation in cortical bone thickness is an indicator of bone quality and health in archeological populations. Second metacarpal radiogrammetry, which measures cortical thickness at the shaft midpoint, is traditionally used to evaluate bone loss in bioarcheological and some clinical contexts. However fragmentary elements are re...
Article
Epidemics and pandemics are typically discussed in terms of morbidity and mortality, susceptibility and immunity, and social responses to and impacts of the immediate epidemic event. Much less attention is paid to the longer-term consequences for individuals and populations in terms of the sequelae of infections, such as blindness after smallpox, d...
Article
Analyses of human skeletal shape and geometry are used to investigate questions related to habitual activities and physical lifeways, as well as biological distance and relatedness. Recently, these methods have been applied to research concerning human evolutionary predisposition for disease, as well as functional experiences of pathological condit...
Conference Paper
This paper reviews new analytical and theoretical perspectives regarding the movement of human and non-human primates. In biological anthropology, there is at times a disconnect between researchers investigating large-scale population movements, such as moving across continents and landscapes, and individual-level physiological and anatomical proce...
Conference Paper
This study uses biomechanical data from the tibia to investigate functional consequences of fractures to the legs (femora, tibiae, and fibulae) in adults from Roman Ancaster, UK and Vagnari, Italy (1st to 4th centuries AD). We hypothesized that some leg bone fractures would cause altered mobility, evident as tibial cortical bone loss and asymmetry,...
Conference Paper
Skeletal trauma and cross-sectional evidence for physical activity were assessed in the limb bones of 1st to 4th century AD Roman adults from Vagnari, Italy (n=66). Vagnari was an imperial estate with evidence for important economic activities that involved manual labor; as such, it was hypothesized that the residents of this community regularly en...
Conference Paper
Extremity fractures can result in nerve and soft tissue damage, prolonged immobilization, pain, and use-avoidance, all of which may lead to limb disuse and bone atrophy. This research used biomechanical methods to investigate the long-term repercussions of fractures. Fracture type, location, malunion, and secondary complications (e.g., osteoarthrit...
Thesis
Long-term repercussions of extremity trauma can include fracture mal- and non-union, osteoarthritis, pain, and impairment of physical movement, which can result in disuse of the limb and eventual bone loss. Although trauma is commonly investigated in palaeopathology, the functional repercussions of injuries are not typically considered. By integrat...
Conference Paper
Skeletal trauma and biomechanical adaptations were assessed in the limb bones of sixty-six 1st to 4th century A.D. Roman adults from Vagnari (Italy). Vagnari was an Imperial Estate with archaeological evidence that agriculture, viticulture, and transhumance were important economic activities. Biomechanical and fracture analyses of the Vagnari sampl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Fracture analyses were integrated with biomechanical data on long bone cross-sectional areas to investigate post-traumatic extremity disuse at the Roman period sites of Ancaster, UK (n=181) and Vagnari, Italy (n=66). Poor functional outcomes can be affected by a fracture’s location, type, and associated complications (e.g., osteoarthritis, malunion...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Second metacarpal (MC2) radiogrammetric methods are often used in palaeopathological studies to identify cortical bone loss, such as that associated with advancing age and osteoporosis. MC2 radiogrammetry is typically limited to complete elements and consequently excludes a number of individuals who, because of increased fragility related to bone l...
Article
Full-text available
Sharp force trauma to the skeleton is an important source of evidence for violent injury in the past. Lesions attributable to possible perimortem sharp force injury were observed in 20 fragments within disarticulated and commingled human bone from the Smith's Knoll collection, an assemblage associated with the battle of Stoney Creek (1813, southern...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Evidence of ‘disability’ in the past is a topic widely discussed in bioarchaeology, but little attention has been paid to the complexities associated with retrospective identification of physical impairment using skeletal evidence. Interpreting how individuals and groups experience injury requires a more detailed understanding of the factors leadin...
Article
Carnivore scats recovered from animal attack and/or scavenging contexts frequently contain forensic evidence such as human bone fragments. Forensic cases with carnivore involvement are increasingly prevalent, necessitating a methodology for the recovery and analysis of scat evidence. This study proposes a method for the safe preparation of carnivor...
Conference Paper

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