Rebecca Gilbert

Rebecca Gilbert
University of Cambridge | Cam · MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit

PhD

About

25
Publications
2,664
Reads
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99
Citations
Introduction
jsPsych developer and Investigator Scientist at the MRC CBU working on web-based methods for experiments, and researching speech perception/comprehension. Previously a post-doc at UCL Experimental Psychology studying the interpretation of ambiguous words. PhD in Psychology from the University of York on timing and order in short-term memory for speech using behavioral, modelling & EEG methods.
Additional affiliations
March 2017 - present
MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit
Position
  • Researcher
March 2015 - March 2017
University College London
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2010 - January 2015
The University of York
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
October 2010 - September 2014
The University of York
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2003 - June 2006
University of Minnesota Morris
Field of study
  • Psychology, Spanish

Publications

Publications (25)
Preprint
Auditory rhythms are ubiquitous in music, speech, and other everyday sounds. Yet, it is unclear how perceived rhythms arise from the repeating structure of sounds. For speech, it is unclear whether rhythm is solely derived from acoustic properties (e.g., rapid amplitude changes), or if it is also influenced by the linguistic units (syllables, words...
Preprint
Listening to spoken language engages domain-general Multiple Demand (MD, fronto-parietal) regions of the human brain, in addition to domain-selective (fronto-temporal) language regions, particularly when comprehension is challenging. However, there is limited evidence that the MD network makes a functional contribution to core aspects of comprehens...
Preprint
Full-text available
Testing that an experiment works as intended is critical for identifying design problems and catching technical errors that could invalidate the results. Testing is also time consuming because of the need to manually run the experiment. This makes testing the experiment costly for researchers, and therefore testing is less comprehensive than testin...
Article
Full-text available
Words with multiple meanings (e.g. bark of the tree/dog) have provided important insights into several key topics within psycholinguistics. Experiments that use ambiguous words require stimuli to be carefully controlled for the relative frequency (dominance) of their different meanings, as this property has pervasive effects on numerous tasks. Domi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Words with multiple meanings (e.g. bark of the tree/dog) have provided important insights into several key topics within psycholinguistics. Experiments that use ambiguous words require stimuli to be carefully controlled for the relative frequency (dominance) of their different meanings, as this property has pervasive effects on numerous tasks. Domi...
Article
Full-text available
Human listeners achieve quick and effortless speech comprehension through computations of conditional probability using Bayes rule. However, the neural implementation of Bayesian perceptual inference remains unclear. Competitive-selection accounts (e.g. TRACE) propose that word recognition is achieved through direct inhibitory connections between u...
Article
Full-text available
A single encounter with an ambiguous word (e.g. bark, ball) in the context of a less-frequent meaning (e.g. "Sally worried about how crowded the ball would be.") can shift the later interpretation of the word toward the same subordinate meaning. This lexical-semantic retuning functions to improve future comprehension of ambiguous words. The present...
Preprint
Semantically ambiguous words (e.g. "bark") challenge word meaning access. An effective comprehension system can use immediate contextual cues and adapt in response to recent experience. We explored the contributions of the domain-specific Language Network and the domain-general Multiple Demand Networks by analysing behavioural data from volunteers...
Preprint
Full-text available
Semantically ambiguous words (e.g. "bark") challenge word meaning access. An effective comprehension system can use immediate contextual cues and adapt in response to recent experience. We explored the contributions of the domain-specific Language Network and the domain-general Multiple Demand Networks by analysing behavioural data from volunteers...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human listeners achieve quick and effortless speech comprehension through computations of conditional probability using Bayes rule. However, the neural implementation of Bayesian perceptual inference remains unclear. Competitive-selection accounts (e.g. TRACE) propose that word recognition is achieved through direct inhibitory connections between u...
Article
Full-text available
Semantically ambiguous words challenge speech comprehension, particularly when listeners must select a less frequent (subordinate) meaning at disambiguation. Using combined magnetoencephalography (MEG) and EEG, we measured neural responses associated with distinct cognitive operations during semantic ambiguity resolution in spoken sentences: (i) in...
Preprint
Full-text available
A single encounter with an ambiguous word (e.g. bark, ball) in a context that supports a less-frequent meaning (e.g. "Sally worried about how crowded the ball would be.") can shift the later interpretation of the word toward that same subordinate meaning. The present paper investigates the impact of varying the position of the disambiguating contex...
Preprint
Full-text available
There is growing interest in understanding what constrains transfer following working memory (WM) training with recent studies investigating what limits transfer within and across different WM paradigms. The primary aim of the current study was to conduct a large-scale latent variable analysis to identify distinct properties between WM tasks to pro...
Article
Research has shown that adults' lexical-semantic representations are surprisingly malleable. For instance, the interpretation of ambiguous words (e.g., bark) is influenced by experience such that recently encountered meanings become more readily available (Rodd et al., 2016, 2013). However, the mechanism underlying this word-meaning priming effect...
Preprint
Research has shown that adults’ lexical-semantic representations are surprisingly malleable. For instance, the interpretation of ambiguous words (e.g. bark) is influenced by experience such that recently encountered meanings become more readily available (Rodd et al., 2016, 2013). However the mechanism underlying this word-meaning priming effect re...
Article
Full-text available
Current models of word-meaning access typically assume that lexical-semantic representations of ambiguous words (e.g., ‘bark of the dog/tree’) reach a relatively stable state in adulthood, with only the relative frequencies of meanings and immediate sentence context determining meaning preference. However, recent experience also affects interpretat...
Article
Full-text available
Research has shown that adults’ lexical-semantic representations are surprisingly malleable. For instance, the interpretation of ambiguous words (e.g. bark) is influenced by experience such that recently encountered meanings become more readily available (Rodd et al., 2016, 2013). However the mechanism underlying this word-meaning priming effect re...
Article
Full-text available
Speech carries accent information relevant to determining the speaker's linguistic and social background. A series of web-based experiments demonstrate that accent cues can modulate access to word meaning. In Experiments 1–3, British participants were more likely to retrieve the American dominant meaning (e.g., hat meaning of ''bonnet ") in a word...
Preprint
Current models of word-meaning access typically assume that lexical-semantic representations of ambiguous words (e.g. ‘bark of the dog/tree’) reach a relatively stable state in adulthood, with only the relative frequencies of the meanings in the language and immediate sentence context determining meaning preference. However, recent experience also...
Preprint
Speech carries accent information relevant to determining the speaker’s linguistic and social background. A series of web-based experiments demonstrate that accent cues can modulate access to word meaning. In Experiments 1-3, British participants were more likely to retrieve the American dominant meaning (e.g., hat meaning of “bonnet”) in a word as...
Article
Full-text available
The capacity of serially-ordered auditory-verbal short-term memory (AVSTM) is sensitive to the timing of the material to be stored, and both temporal processing and AVSTM capacity are implicated in the development of language. We developed a novel ?rehearsal-probe? task to investigate the relationship between temporal precision and the capacity to...

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