Rebecca A. Dore

Rebecca A. Dore
The Ohio State University | OSU · Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy

About

32
Publications
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Reads
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Although e-books allow young children to read independently, children could be missing out on opportunities to develop positive emotional associations with reading. The current study explored whether there are differences in emotions and physiological arousal when parents and children read traditional books or e-books together or when children list...
Article
This study examined the dimensionality of caregivers’ child-directed talk and the association of child directed talk and children’s language skills at age of 3 years in a sample of 63 low-SES dyads in low-SES homes. Exploratory factor analysis identified that caregivers’ child directed talk is characterized by two dimensions: quantity and complexit...
Article
Since the advent of television in the 1950s, parents, educators, researchers, and policy makers have been concerned about the effects of screen time on children's development. Then, when computers became widely used, a new wave of interest in the positive and negative effects of this new medium was generated. Within the past 15 years, the developme...
Article
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Even prior to the COVID-19 crisis, one of the children’s most common screen activities was using the video-sharing platform YouTube, with many children preferring YouTube over television. The pandemic has significantly increased the amount of time many children spend on YouTube—watching videos for both entertainment and education. However, it is un...
Article
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During the unprecedented coronavirus disease (COVID-19) crisis, virtual education activities have become more prevalent than ever. One activity that many families have incorporated into their routines while at home is virtual storytime, with teachers, grandparents, and other remote adults reading books to children over video chat. The current study...
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Media use could be detrimental to children’s language and literacy skills because it may displace other language-enhancing activities like shared reading and caregiver-child interactions. Furthermore, the extent to which children use media with adults (joint media engagement), the extent to which they use interactive media (apps/games), and the tim...
Article
Full-text available
Media use is a pervasive aspect of children’s home experiences but is often not considered in studies of the home learning environment. Media use could be detrimental to children’s language and literacy skills because it may displace other literacy-enhancing activities like shared reading and decrease the quantity and quality of caregiver–child int...
Article
Joint media engagement (JME) refers broadly to people using media together, including adults using media with children, and captures a variety of experiences that children might have co‐using media that might otherwise be called coviewing, scaffolding, or active mediation. Research suggests that the frequency of JME varies across families and acros...
Article
Background: Nearly 13 million American children experience food insecurity. Research suggests that maternal depression is associated with food insecurity, such that mothers who experience depression are more likely to be food insecure. Maternal self-efficacy may be an important protective factor against depression during the postpartum year, inter...
Article
Despite the prevalence of educational apps for children, there is little evidence of their effectiveness for learning. Here, children were asked to learn ten new words in a narrative mobile game that requires children use knowledge of word meanings to advance the game. Study 1 used a lab-based between-subjects design with middle-SES 4-year-olds and...
Chapter
In this chapter, we will explore explanations for this conflicting evidence, and importantly, demonstrate the power of evidence-based recommendations for e-book use. In an effort to compare traditional books and e-books, this chapter will apply four pillars of learning generated from the Science of Learning (Hirsh-Pasek K, Zosh JM, Golinkoff RM, Gr...
Article
Children learn about the world through others’ testimony, and much of this knowledge likely comes from parents. Furthermore, parents may sometimes want children to share their beliefs about topics on which there is no universal consensus. In discussing such topics, parents may use explicit belief statements (e.g., “Evolution is real”) or implicit b...
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Full-text available
Theory of mind is the understanding that other people have mental states that drive their actions and that those mental states can be different from one’s own. Without understanding theory of mind and being able to take others’ perspectives, it could be difficult for children to read and understand narrative texts. This paper posits that children’s...
Article
One potential advantage of e-books is that unlike traditional books, preschoolers can read independent of an adult by using the audio narration feature. However, little research has investigated whether children comprehend a story's content after using an e-book with audio narration. The current study compares preschoolers’ comprehension of an e-bo...
Chapter
Digital media and electronic toys are changing the landscape of childhood. How does this change impact language learning? In this chapter, we explore potential alignment between six established principles of language learning and children's engagement with digital media and electronic toys. We argue that electronic toys and digital media are not so...
Chapter
As the United States and other countries consider “educational reform,” the discussion appears to be primarily about fostering basic skills and content knowledge. Our contention is that this approach is not sufficient. Instead, we argue that for twenty-first century success, we must also foster creativity to prepare today’s children to excel and so...
Article
White American adults assume Blacks feel less pain than do Whites, but only if they believe Blacks have faced greater economic hardship than Whites. The current study investigates when in development children first recognize racial group differences in economic hardship, and examines whether perceptions of hardship inform children's racial bias in...
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Full-text available
Adults adopt the traits of characters in narratives, but little is known about whether children do so. In Study 1, 7- and 10-year-olds ( N=96 ) heard a 2.5-minute recording about a professor or cheerleader. Reporting higher engagement in the professor narrative related to more time playing with an analytical toy (a Rubik’s cube), whereas reporting...
Article
Full-text available
Pretend play has been claimed to be crucial to children's healthy development. Here we examine evidence for this position versus 2 alternatives: Pretend play is 1 of many routes to positive developments (equifinality), and pretend play is an epiphenomenon of other factors that drive development. Evidence from several domains is considered. For lang...
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Full-text available
Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of origin...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the relationship between theory of mind (ToM) and engaging in fantasy worlds in a short-term longitudinal study. Engagement in fantasy worlds might advance ToM because engaging in alternative worlds is similar to imagining the world from others’ viewpoints. Fantasy might also be related to preference for describing others’ mental states...
Article
Social values theory was used to examine how parents make decisions for their adolescent children. Social values theory states that decision making for others is based on the social value of an action, leading to a norm for how to decide for others, whereas self decisions are influenced by a number of additional factors. Consistent with a risk-aver...
Article
Previous research indicates that American adults, both Black and White, assume a priori that Black people feel less pain than do White people (Trawalter, Hoffman, & Waytz, 2012, PLoS One, 7[11], 1–8). The present work investigates when in development this bias emerges. Five-, 7-, and 10-year-olds first rated the amount of pain they themselves would...
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Full-text available
Against a long tradition of childhood realism (Piaget, 192934. Piaget , J. 1929. The child's conception of the world., New York, NY: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. View all references), A. S. Lillard and J. H. Flavell (1990) found that 3-year-olds prefer to characterize people by their mental states (beliefs, desires, emotions) than by their visible b...
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Full-text available
We greatly appreciate the astute comments on Lillard et al. (2013) and the opportunity to reply. Here we point out the importance of keeping conceptual distinctions clear regarding play, pretend play, and exploration. We also discuss methodological issues with play research. We end with speculation that if pretend play did not emerge because it was...
Article
Full-text available
Pretend play has been claimed to be crucial to children's healthy development. Here we examine evidence for this position versus 2 alternatives: Pretend play is 1 of many routes to positive developments (equifinality), and pretend play is an epiphenomenon of other factors that drive development. Evidence from several domains is considered. For lang...