Raymond E. Miles

Raymond E. Miles
University of California, Berkeley | UCB · Haas School of Business

PhD Stanford University, 1963

About

82
Publications
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16,424
Citations

Publications

Publications (82)
Article
Most firms identify market opportunities for their new technologies after they have been developed. This article discusses the design of a “futures group” which can help to synchronize a firm’s technology and market development. A futures group designed to span more than one organization could lead to simultaneous market development for multiple te...
Article
Firms increasingly face competitive pressures related to rapid and continuous adaptation to a complex, dynamic, and highly interconnected global environment. Pressing challenges include keeping pace with shorter product life cycles, incorporating multiple technologies into the design of new products, cocreating products and services with customers...
Article
Full-text available
I am excited about this new journal focused on the subject of organization design. In my view, organization design is a central issue in the field of management. Designing an organization requires an understanding of strategy, as we pointed out some time ago (Miles & snow, 1978). For example, if you want to be a prospector (a first-mover strategy),...
Article
I am excited about this new journal focused on the subject of organization design. In my view, organization design is a central issue in the field of management. Designing an organization requires an understanding of strategy, as we pointed out some time ago (Miles & Snow, 1978). For example, if you want to be a prospector (a first-mover strategy),...
Article
Current firm experiments within a set of knowledge driven segments of the global economy suggest the possible rebirth of the managerial values and commitments to participative leadership and collaborative creativity that flourished in the US in the 1960s. Potential barriers include a focus on short term profits and intellectual property protection...
Article
The increased importance of knowledge creation and use to firms' global competitiveness has spawned considerable experimentation with organizational designs for product development and commercialization over the last three decades. This paper discusses innovation-related organizational design developments during this period, showing how firms have...
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Full-text available
Inter-organizational models are both a well-documented phenomena and a well-established domain in management and business ethics. Those models rest on collaborative capabilities. However, mainstream theories and practices aimed at developing these capabilities are based on a narrow set of assumptions and ethical principles about human nature and re...
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E very generation of managers experiments with new business mod-els. New business models succeed or fail not only because of their own strengths and limitations, but also because of the amount of fit they enjoy with the management philosophies and organizational processes available to support them. Today, much of the ongoing experimenta-tion with b...
Article
This paper examines a new inter-organizational form which is emerging from collaborative innovation processes within and across communities of firms operating in complementary markets. Idea sharing think tanks around high tech centers at leading universities and, more generally, around clusters, are well-documented phenomena. These inter-organizati...
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Full-text available
U.S. leadership in technological innovation has remained an important source of national income and pride. Indeed, recognizing that advanced economies compete primarily on the basis of innovation, U.S. scholars were among the early leaders in studying and describing effective organizational approaches to knowledge creation, sharing, and utilization...
Article
The supply chain is the central organizing unit in today's global industries. We describe how supply chains have evolved over the last three decades, arguing that their organizational history can be divided into three periods. In the first period, the primary focus was on how to make operations throughout the supply chain more efficient. In the sec...
Chapter
The overall objective of this chapter is to reinvigorate interest in the configurational approach to organization design. Configurational analysis developed in promising ways in the 1970s and 1980s and then stalled. We believe, however, that the configurational approach can be improved such that it will serve the interests of scholars, managers, an...
Article
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.– Yogi Berra
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This article comments on the book on management education, titled Managers Not MBAs: A Hard Look at the Soft Practice of Managing and Management Development, by Henry Mintzberg. The book comes in two parts. Part I describes and illustrates how and why the typical Master of Business Administration program does little to develop managerial skills and...
Article
Raymond E. Miles is professor emeritus and former dean of the Walter A. Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior and Industrial Relations from Stanford. He has published five books and over fifty articles based on his research on leadership and managerial philosophies, organizatio...
Article
Firms are increasingly relying on “knowledge activists” to facilitate the flow of knowledge. This paper discusses which initiatives by activists are most likely to succeed. It identifies a conceptual framework that illustrates the conditions essential to full knowledge sharing and illustrates its effectiveness through a selection of case studies. I...
Article
In the main, the creation and transfer of knowledge is a voluntary, intrinsically satisfying social process. In firms, new insights about products and processes emerge interactively, usually within trusting, satisfying relationships among organizational members. Increasingly, firms are attempting to gain competitive advantage by employing knowledge...
Article
Employees are motivated intrinsically as well as extrinsically. Intrinsic motivation is crucial when tacit knowledge in and between teams must be transferred. Organizational forms enable different kinds of motivation and have different capacities to generate and transfer tacit knowledge. Since knowledge generation and transfer are essential for a f...
Article
According to William E. Coyne, Senior Vice President for Research and Development at 3M, “Most modern companies now recognise that the best way to increase corporate earnings is through top-line growth, and the best route to top-line growth is through innovation”. The ability to innovate, however, comes from a skill that is underdeveloped in most c...
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Full-text available
Each major era in business history has featured a particular form of organization. Early hierarchical, vertically integrated organizations have largely given way to network organizations that link the assets and know-how of numerous upstream and downstream industry partners. A number of leading companies today are experimenting with a new way of or...
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Full-text available
Sumario: The best way to increase corporate earnings is through top-line growth, and the best route to it, is innovation. The hability to innovate comes from collaboration, what is essentially knowledge creation and utilisation. Understanding this long-linked process will be profitable for companies in the twenty-first century global economy
Article
Full-text available
Whether in high-tech, service, or traditional industries, the role of knowledge as a primary driver of development is being increasingly recognized. It is not clear, however, whether managerial approaches based on mindsets rooted in past practice are appropriate for, or capable of, fully realizing the potential value of knowledge within the firm an...
Article
Executive Overview Each major era in business history has featured a particular form of organization. Early hierarchical, vertically integrated organizations have largely given way to network organizations that link the assets and know-how of numerous upstream and downstream industry partners. A number of leading companies today are experimenting w...
Article
The characteristics and attributes that typify a managerial career are shifting along with developments in organization structure. The competencies needed by a successful manager in today's organizations may be inadequate in the emerging organizational forms of the 21st century. Based on an analysis of organizational trends, as well as on interview...
Article
suggests a conceptual framework that explores organizational trust through the attitudes and behaviors of managers and highlights the interactive role of trust in managerial philosophies and organizational forms / offers general propositions concerning the differential trust requirements of alternative organizational forms / suggests a conceptual c...
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Why have some U.S. firms succeeded in redesigning themselves to meet competitive demands while others have not? Successful firms meet three key requirements for effective redesign: a commitment to total redesign as an economic "must," not simply an "ought;" a clear strategic vision supported by the structure and process changes necessary to achieve...
Article
It's called a ''network organization''-a lean, highly flexible, ''disaggregated' company that operates through a cluster of down-sized, focused business units. Market mechanisms, rather than layers of mid-level decision makers, drive strategy, and senior managers stand ready to outsource any function that does not meet competitive tests. This form...
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This article forecasts the problems that the emerging network form of organization faces as the result of managerial actions which inadvertently damage the operating capabilities of network organization. It examines the managerial mistakes that have plagued and continue to plague earlier functional, divisional, and matrix forms of organization, act...
Article
Following a decade of declining productivity and failed organizations, many U.S. companies in the eighties have been forced to rethink their competitive approaches. This search is producing a new organizational form—a unique combination of strategy, structure, and management processes that the authors refer to as the "dynamic network." This new for...
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The business of business education is booming. But in the midst of this massive growth, business schools will need to answer questions about the relevance of their curriculum to the new organizational needs of business. As business evolves into a new organizational form—one based on network structures incorporating new technologies and new industri...
Article
The experiences of 3 electronics companies with different corporate strategies (defending, prospecting, and analyzing) illustrate how the amount of emphasis on particular human resources functions must be dictated by the organization's basic strategy. These functions include recruitment, selection, and placement; staff planning; training and develo...
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What determines organizational success or failure—culture? structural characteristics? leadership style? This article argues that success is primarily a product of achieving tight fit (consistency) among strategy, structure and management processes. "Hall of Fame" companies tend to achieve tight fit early, while misfits (e.g., Chrysler in the 1970s...
Article
“Books and articles come and go, endlessly. But a few do stick, and this book is such a one. Organizational Strategy, Structure, and Process broke fresh ground in the understanding of strategy at a time when thinking about strategy was still in its early days, and it has not been displaced since.” —David J. Hickson, Emeritus Professor of Inte...
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Full-text available
Organizational adaptation is a topic that has received only limited and fragmented theoretical treatment. Any attempt to examine organizational adaptation is difficult, since the process is highly complex and changeable. The proposed theoretical framework deals with alternative ways in which organizations define their product-market domains (strate...
Article
Full-text available
Organizational adaptation is a topic that has received only limited and fragmented theoretical treatment. Any attempt to examine organizational adaptation is difficult, since the process is highly complex and changeable. The proposed theoretical framework deals with alternative ways in which organizations define their product-market domains (strate...
Article
Reviews the book, The Scanlon Plan for Organization Development: Identity, Participation, and Equity by Carl F. Frost, John H. Wakeley, and Robert A. Ruh (see record 1975-02075-000 ). The Scanlon Plan is designed to generate and implement cost savings suggestions and to calculate and distribute the benefits to all organization members according to...
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Full-text available
The theory of participative management has held the spotlight of debate in management literature. This article examines the purposes of participative management and, using different systems and models, discusses its advantages and disadvantages.
Article
The article provides viewpoints from different members of a committee on behavioral science and management. Chairman Ross A. Webber of the University of Pennsylvania discusses the differences between theoretical study of management concepts and their application in the business world. William Fox of the University of Florida states that managers an...
Article
Submitted to the Graduate School of Business. Thesis (Ph. D.)--Stanford University, 1963.
Article
The association between hierarchical position, organization size, and span of control and five dimensions of managerial decision behavior-perceived influence on superiors, autonomy from superiors, reliance on subordinates, personal initiation, and final choice-is examined for 190 managers in eight different companies. Hierarchical position was foun...
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Full-text available
The behavioral implications of variance controls have generally been ignored. This paper examines the characteristics of variance controls, traces their use in modern organizations, and suggests further areas for application and improvement.

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