Raul Sanchez-Lopez

Raul Sanchez-Lopez
Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education (IGDORE) | IGDORE

PhD Hearing Sciences
I am looking for a new position to continue my work towards improving the quality of life of people with hearing loss

About

35
Publications
6,393
Reads
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93
Citations
Citations since 2017
30 Research Items
93 Citations
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Introduction
I have always been fascinated by the auditory system and how the different elements in it work together. It is impressive, that small variations of air (sound) pressure can produce a hearing sensation and, even more remarkable, to allow verbal communication. My background as a clinical audiologist, technical engineering skills, broad knowledge about hearing impairments, and my enthusiasm are the core characteristics of my unique scientific profile.
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - January 2020
Technical University of Denmark
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
July 2016 - August 2020
Technical University of Denmark
Field of study
  • Hearing Sciences

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Pure-tone audiometry still represents the main measure to characterize individual hearing loss and the basis for hearing-aid fitting. However, the perceptual consequences of hearing loss are typically associated not only with a loss of sensitivity but also with a loss of clarity that is not captured by the audiogram. A detailed characterization of...
Article
Full-text available
The sources and consequences of a sensorineural hearing loss are diverse. While several approaches have aimed at disentangling the physiological and perceptual consequences of different etiologies, hearing deficit characterization and rehabilitation have been dominated by the results from pure-tone audiometry. Here, we present a novel approach base...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Hearing rehabilitation attempts to compensate for auditory dysfunction, reduce hearing difficulties and minimise participation restrictions that can lead to social isolation. However, there is no systematic approach to assess the quality of the intervention at an individual level that might help to evaluate the need of further hearing reh...
Article
Full-text available
The Better hEAring Rehabilitation (BEAR) project aims to provide a new clinical profiling tool—a test battery—for hearing loss characterization. Although the loss of sensitivity can be efficiently measured using pure-tone audiometry, the assessment of supra-threshold hearing deficits remains a challenge. In contrast to the classical “attenuation-di...
Article
Full-text available
Hearing loss is the third leading cause of years lived with disability. It is estimated that 430 million people worldwide are affected, and the number of cases is expected to increase in the future. There is therefore increased pressure on hearing health systems around the world to improve efficiency and reduce costs to ensure increased access to q...
Article
Full-text available
1) Background: To improve hearing-aid rehabilitation, the Danish 'Better hEAring Rehabilitation' (BEAR) project recently developed methods for individual hearing loss characterization and hearing-aid fitting. Four auditory profiles differing in terms of audiometric hearing loss and supra-threshold hearing abilities were identified. To enable audito...
Poster
Full-text available
Large-scale datasets, such as the UK Biobank and the Human Connectome Project, have proved extremely powerful for facilitating research into mechanisms of human health and disease. A limitation of most existing resources, however, is that hearing health phenotypes are captured at a rudimentary level, where even basic pure-tone audiometry data are r...
Poster
The user-operated audiometry (UAud) project aims at introducing an automated system for user-operated audiometric testing into everyday clinical practice. In that context, the Audible Contrast Threshold (ACT™) test is proposed as a test of supra-threshold hearing ability and as a language-independent alternative to speech-in-noise tests. Here, five...
Cover Page
Full-text available
Currently, the clinical characterization of hearing deficits for hearing aid fitting is based primarily on the pure-tone audiogram. In our work, we explored how data-driven approaches can effectively identify patient subpopulations with distinct differences in terms of their hearing abilities. This process is what we called “auditory profiling”; it...
Article
Full-text available
Background—The clinical characterization of hearing deficits for hearing-aid fitting purposes is typically based on the pure-tone audiogram only. In a previous study, a group of hearing-impaired listeners completed a comprehensive test battery that was designed to tap into different dimensions of hearing abilities. A data-driven analysis of the dat...
Article
Full-text available
Effective hearing aid (HA) rehabilitation requires personalization of the HA fitting parameters, but in current clinical practice only the gain prescription is typically individualized. To optimize the fitting process, advanced HA settings such as noise reduction and microphone directionality can also be tailored to individual hearing deficits. In...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Currently, clinical characterization of hearing deficits for hearing-aid fitting is based on the pure-tone audiogram. Implicitly, this assumes that the audiogram can predict performance in complex, supra-threshold tasks. Sanchez-Lopez et al. (2018) hypothesized that the hearing deficits of a given listener, both at threshold and supra-threshold lev...
Preprint
Full-text available
Objective: Hearing rehabilitation attempts to compensate for auditory dysfunction, reduce hearing difficulties and minimize participation restrictions that can lead to social isolation. However, there is no systematic approach to assess the quality of the intervention at an individual level that might help to evaluate the need of further hearing re...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Plomp (1986) described the consequences of hearing impairment in speech communication as the sum of two components: attenuation and distortion. Recent studies have shown that the sensitivity to spectro-temporal modulations (STM) might be linked to speech intelligibility in noise, suggesting that supra-threshold, or “internal”, distortions would aff...
Preprint
Full-text available
Objective: The clinical characterization of hearing deficits for hearing-aid fitting purposes is typically based on the pure-tone audiogram only. In a previous study, a group of hearing-impaired listeners were tested using a comprehensive test battery designed to tap into different aspects of hearing. A data-driven analysis of the data yielded four...
Preprint
Full-text available
Data-driven profiling allows uncovering complex hidden structures in a dataset and has been used as a diagnostic tool in various fields of work. In audiology, the clinical characterization of hearing deficits for hearing-aid fitting is typically based on the pure-tone audiogram only. Implicitly, this relies on the assumption that the audiogram can...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The current study forms part of the Better hEAring Rehabilitation (BEAR) project, which aims at developing new clinical tools for characterizing individual hearing loss and for assessing hearing-aid (HA) benefit. Its purpose was to investigate potential interactions between four auditory profiles and three measures of HA outcome obtained for six HA...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Better hEAring Rehabilitation (BEAR) project aims to provide a new clinical profiling tool, a test battery, for hearing loss characterization. Whereas the loss of sensitivity can be efficiently measured using pure-tone audiometry, the assessment of supra-threshold hearing deficits remains a challenge. In contrast to the classical attenuation-di...
Poster
Full-text available
Currently, clinical characterization of hearing deficits for hearing-aid fitting is based on the pure-tone audiogram only. Implicitly, this assumes that the audiogram can predict performance on complex, supra-threshold tasks. Sanchez-Lopez et al. (Trends in Hearing, Vol. 22, 2018) hypothesized that the hearing deficits of a given listener, both at...
Data
This repository contains raw and processed data used and described in: R. Sanchez-Lopez, S.G. Nielsen, M. El-Haj-Ali, F. Bianchi, M, Fereckzowski, O. Cañete, M. Wu, T. Neher, T. Dau and S. Santurette (under review). ``Auditory tests for characterizing hearing deficits: The BEAR test battery,'' Int. J. of Audiology. [Preprint available in medRxiv:...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The current study forms part of the Better hEAring Rehabilitation (BEAR) project, which aims to develop and evaluate new clinical tools for individual hearing loss characterization and hearing aid (HA) benefit assessment. The purpose of the current study was to assess the interaction between four different auditory profiles and two measures of hear...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
One aim of the Better hEAring Rehabilitation (BEAR) project is to define a new clinical profiling tool, a test battery, for individualized hearing loss characterization. Recently, Sanchez-Lopez et al. (2019) proposed a test battery that includes six types of measures: audibility, middle-ear analysis, speech perception, binaural-processing abilities...
Poster
Full-text available
The current study forms part of the Better hEAring Rehabilitation (BEAR) project, which aims at developing new clinical tools for characterizing individual hearing loss and for assessing hearing-aid (HA) benefit. Its purpose was to investigate potential interactions between four auditory profiles and three measures of HA outcome obtained for six HA...
Poster
Background The Better hEAring Rehabilitation (BEAR) project pursues the development and assessment of new clinically feasible strategies for individual hearing-loss diagnosis and hearing-aid fitting. The aim is to improve the current clinical practice, where the fitting process relies on the pure-tone audiogram and trial-and-error methods, which us...
Poster
Full-text available
Background While the audiogram still stands as the main tool for selecting hearing-aid compensation strategies in audiological clinics, there is ample evidence that loss of hearing sensitivity cannot fully account for common difficulties encountered by people with sensorineural hearing loss, such as understanding speech in noisy environments. Forty...
Poster
Full-text available
The Better hEAring Rehabilitation (BEAR) project pursues the development and evaluation of new clinically feasible strategies for individual hearing loss diagnosis and hearing aid fitting. Two essential elements of this research are the design of a new diagnostic test battery for identifying different auditory profiles and linking those profiles to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Hearing-aid users have reported an increased satisfaction since digital technology and advanced signal processing became available in hearing aids. However, many users still experience difficulties in noisy environments and in complex listening scenarios. Although numerous parameters can be adjusted to provide an individualized hearing solution, he...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Nowadays, the pure-tone audiogram is the main tool used to characterize hearing loss and to fit hearing aids. However, the perceptual consequences of hearing loss are typically not only associated with a loss of sensitivity, but also with a clarity loss that is not captured by the audiogram. A detailed characterization of hearing loss has to be sim...
Poster
Nowadays, the pure-tone audiogram is the main tool used to characterize the degree of hearing loss and for hearing-aid fitting. However, the perceptual consequences of hearing loss are typically associated not only to a loss of sensitivity, but also to a loss of clarity (distortions) that is not captured by the audiogram. Here, we hypothesize that...
Poster
Full-text available
When a signal varies in its properties along the time and frequency, this is considered a modulation. Speech signals exhibit temporal and spectral modulations. The sensitivity to these modulations has been studied in normal-hearing (NH) listeners, yielding temporal, spectral and spectro-temporal modulation transfer functions (Dau et al. 1997, Eddin...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The ability of human listeners to detect and discriminate spectro-temporal ripples in sound has been shown to be correlated with speech intelligibility performance in several conditions. Thus, if a model would be able to account for the spectro-temporal processing limits in the auditory system, such a framework could be used to analyze the auditory...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Assessment of the compressive nonlinearity in the hearing system provides useful information about the inner ear. Auditory-steady state responses (ASSR) have recently been used to estimate the state of the compressive nonlinearity in the peripheral auditory system. Since it is commonly assumed that outer hair cells in the inner ear play an importan...
Poster
Full-text available
Auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) allow objective assessment of auditory function using electroencephalography (EGG). If peripheral compression is, at least partially, due to cochlear compression, the amplitude of ASSR as a function of level can be assumed to reflect the compressive growth of the cochlear nonlinearity. A recent study (Encina L...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Hi;
I have recently discovered these two institutions ( IGDORE and Ronin Institute) and I would like to talk to someone who is affiliated to them and get some insights about how they work. Also, I would be interested in knowing about your experience as "independent researcher".
Thanks
Best wishes
Question
This message is for Spanish and Hispano-American Scientists:
Hola a tod@s;
Como todo Español o Hispano-americano tengo dos apellidos, el de mi padre y el de mi madre. Sin embargo, esto no es usual en otros países y a la hora de publicar estoy encontrando algunos "problemillas".
Al principio decidí descartar mi segundo apellido y ser Raul Sanchez o Raul H Sanchez. Sin embargo, en mi universidad, aparezco con mi nombre oficial: http://orbit.dtu.dk/en/persons/raul-sanchez-lopez(2fec602c-d244-46d1-85bc-5f29334a659c).html
El problema, es que despues de publicar un "journal paper", a la hora de citarlo, están habiendo varias confusiones y me citan como Lopez RS ya que incluso el journal sugiere este formato.
Ahora mismo, estoy utilizando Sanchez-Lopez con el guion como la opcion más acertada y estoy considerando cambiar mi apellido de forma permanente.
Mi pregunta es: Cómo lo habéis hecho vosotros? Alguien ha cambiado formalmente sus apellidos debido a esto?
Un cordial Saludo
Raul H.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (6)
Project
We are establishing the Nottingham Hearing BioResource (NHB), a unique “hearing-focused biobank” to accelerate research towards the next generation of precision audiological care. This resource is urgently needed to allow the power of big data and modern bioinformatics tools to be leveraged in a way that can transform how we treat and manage hearing loss and hearing-related conditions in future. Our mid-term goal (over five years) is to build an accessible collection of samples and data from >2,500 individuals who will have undergone deep auditory phenotyping, genetic sequencing and biomarker analysis, and rigorous assessment of real-world listening experiences. Towards this goal, our immediate objective is to complete development of the infrastructure, governance framework, and scientific protocols needed to open the NHB for recruitment by late-2024.
Project
To introduce an automated system for user-operated audiometric testing into everyday clinic practice as a means to relieve part of the pressure on hearing health systems to improve efficiency and reduce costs to ensure increased access to quality hearing health care.
Archived project
Assessment of the compressive nonlinearity in the hearing system provides useful information about the inner ear. Auditory-steady state responses (ASSR) have recently been used to estimate the state of the compressive nonlinearity in the peripheral auditory system. Since it is commonly assumed that outer hair cells in the inner ear play an important role in the compressive nonlinearity, it is desirable to selectively obtain information about the inner ear. In the current study, the signal in the ear canal present during ASSR measurements is utilized to extract sinusoidally-amplitude modulated otoacoustic emissions (SAMOAEs). It is hypothesized that the stimulus used to evoke ASSRs will cause acoustic energy to be reflected back from the inner ear into the ear canal, where it can be picked up as an otoacoustic emission (OAE) and provide information about cochlear processing.