Raul Donoso

Raul Donoso
Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana · PIDi

PhD

About

37
Publications
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712
Citations

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
The self-sufficient cytochrome P450 RhF and its homologues belonging to the CYP116B subfamily have attracted considerable attention due to the potential for biotechnological applications based in their ability to catalyse an array of challenging oxidative reactions without requiring additional protein partners. In this work, we showed for the first...
Article
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Burkholderia sensu lato (s.l.) species have a versatile metabolism. The aims of this review are the genomic reconstruction of the metabolic pathways involved in the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by Burkholderia s.l. genera, and the characterization of the PHA synthases and the pha genes organization. The reports of the PHA synthesis fro...
Article
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We report the complete 8.94-Mb genome sequence of the type strain of Cupriavidus basilensis (DSM 11853 = CCUG 49340 = RK1), formed by two chromosomes and six putative plasmids, which offers insights into its chloroaromatic-biodegrading capabilities.
Article
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Furans represent a class of promising chemicals, since they constitute valuable intermediates in conversion of biomass into sustainable products intended to replace petroleum-derivatives. Conversely, generation of furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) as by-products in lignocellulosic hydrolysates is undesirable due its inhibitory effect over...
Article
Bradyrhizobium japonicum E109 is a bacterium widely used for inoculants production in Argentina. It is known for its ability to produce several phytohormones and degrade indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The genome sequence of B. japonicum E109 was recently analyzed and it showed the presence of genes related to the synthesis of IAA by indole-3-acetonitr...
Article
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Members of the genus Pseudomonas inhabit diverse environments, such as soil, water, plants and humans. The variability of habitats is reflected in the diversity of the structure and composition of their genomes. This cosmopolitan bacterial genus includes species of biotechnological, medical and environmental importance. In this study, we report on...
Article
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Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas chil-ensis strain ABC1, which was isolated from a soil interstitial water sample collected at the University Adolfo Ibañez, Valparaiso, Chile. We assembled PacBio reads into a single closed contig with 209ϫ mean coverage, yielding a 4,035,896-bp sequence with 62% GC content and 3,555 predi...
Article
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Rhodococcus ruber R1 was isolated from a pulp mill wastewater treatment plant because of its ability to use methoxylated aromatics as growth substrates. We report the 5.56-Mb genome sequence of strain R1, which can provide insights into the biodegradation of lignin-derived phenolic monomers and potentially support processes for lignocellulose conve...
Article
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Pseudomonas sp. strains ALS1279 and ALS1131 were isolated from wastewater treatment facilities on the basis of their ability to use furfural, a key lignocellulose-derived inhibitor, as their only carbon source. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of both strains, which can shed light on catabolic pathways for furan compounds in pseudomonads...
Article
Quorum-sensing systems play important roles in host colonization and host establishment of Burkholderiales species. Beneficial Paraburkholderia species share a conserved quorum-sensing (QS) system, designated BraI/R, that controls different phenotypes. In this context, the plant growth-promoting bacterium Paraburkholderia phytofirmans PsJN possesse...
Article
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Paraburkholderia phytofirmans PsJN is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that stimulates plant growth and improves tolerance to abiotic stresses. This study analyzed whether strain PsJN can reduce plant disease severity and proliferation of the virulent strain Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000 in Arabidopsis plants, through th...
Article
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Abiotic stress has a growing impact on plant growth and agricultural activity worldwide. Specific plant growth promoting rhizobacteria have been reported to stimulate growth and tolerance to abiotic stress in plants, and molecular mechanisms like phytohormone synthesis and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deamination are usual candidates proposed...
Article
Full-text available
Several bacteria use the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as a sole carbon and energy source. A cluster of genes (named iac ) encoding IAA degradation has been reported in Pseudomonas putida 1290, but the functions of these genes are not completely understood. The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Paraburkholderia phytofirmans PsJN harb...
Chapter
Aromatic compounds are widely distributed in nature. They are found as lignin components, aromatic amino acids, and xenobiotic compounds, among others. Microorganisms, mostly bacteria, degrade an impressive variety of such chemical structures. Various aerobic aromatic catabolic pathways have been reported in bacteria, which typically consist of act...
Article
Full-text available
Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134, like many other environmental bacteria uses a range of aromatic compounds as carbon sources. Previous reports have shown the preference for benzoate when this bacterium grows on binary mixtures composed of this aromatic compound and 4-hydroxybenzoate or phenol. However, this observation has not been extended to ot...
Article
Full-text available
Although not fully understood, molecular communication in the rhizosphere plays an important role regulating traits involved in plant-bacteria association. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN is a well-known plant growth promoting bacterium, which establishes rhizospheric and endophytic colonization in different plants. A competent colonization is essen...
Article
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Plant rhizosphere and internal tissues may constitute a relevant habitat for soil bacteria displaying high catabolic versatility towards xenobiotic aromatic compounds. Root exudates contain various molecules that are structurally related to aromatic xenobiotics and have been shown to stimulate bacterial degradation of aromatic pollutants in the rhi...
Article
The relevance of the β-proteobacterial Burkholderiales order in the degradation of a vast array of aromatic compounds, including several priority pollutants, has been largely assumed. In this review, the presence and organization of genes encoding oxygenases involved in aromatics biodegradation in 80 Burkholderiales genomes is analysed. This genomi...
Article
As other environmental bacteria, Cupriavidus necator JMP134 uses benzoate as preferred substrate in mixtures with 4-hydroxybenzoate, strongly inhibiting its degradation. The mechanism underlying this hierarchical use was studied. A C. necator benA mutant, defective in the first step of benzoate degradation, is unable to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate...
Article
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Catechols are central intermediates in the metabolism of aromatic compounds. Degradation of 4-methylcatechol via intradiol cleavage usually leads to the formation of 4-methylmuconolactone (4-ML) as a dead-end metabolite. Only a few microorganisms are known to mineralize 4-ML. The mml gene cluster of Pseudomonas reinekei MT1, which encodes enzymes i...
Chapter
Full-text available
Aromatic compounds are widely distributed in nature. They are found as lignin components, aromatic amino acids, and xenobiotic compounds, among others. Microorganisms, mostly bacteria, degrade an impressive variety of such chemical structures. Various aerobic aromatic catabolic pathways have been reported in bacteria, which typically consist of act...
Article
Full-text available
Maleylacetate reductases (MAR) are required for biodegradation of several substituted aromatic compounds. To date, the functionality of two MAR-encoding genes (tfdF(I) and tfdF(II)) has been reported in Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4), a known degrader of aromatic compounds. These two genes are located in tfd gene clusters involved in the turnover...

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Project (1)
Project
Microbial degradation of environmental pollutants