Rasmi Shoocongdej

Rasmi Shoocongdej
Silpakorn University · Faculty of Archaeology

Ph.D. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, U.S.A.

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47
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Publications

Publications (47)
Article
The long period spanning the Neolithic to the Metal Age is still poorly understood in the Thai-Malay peninsula (TMP), and current interpretations rely on limited data from a large region and a few dates obtained mainly from inland cave sites. There has yet to be any published research on estuarine and coastal contexts for this period. In 2017 The F...
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Two species in the subfamily Caprinae, the Sumatran serow Capricornis sumatraensis and Chinese goral Naemorhedus griseus are currently distributed in Thailand and listed as vulnerable species. The Himalayan goral N. goral has no dispersion in Thailand, whereas fossil evidence shows the coexistence of all three species during the Pleistocene. Howeve...
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Established chronologies indicate a long-term ‘Hoabinhian’ hunter-gatherer occupation of Mainland Southeast Asia during the Terminal Pleistocene to Mid-Holocene (45 000–3000 years ago). Here, the authors re-examine the ‘Hoabinhian’ sequence from north-west Thailand using new radiocarbon and luminescence data from Spirit Cave, Steep Cliff Cave and B...
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The late Pleistocene settlement of highland settings in mainland Southeast Asia by Homo sapiens has challenged our species’s ability to occupy mountainous landscapes that acted as physical barriers to the expansion into lower-latitude Sunda islands during sea-level lowstands. Tham Lod Rockshelter in highland Pang Mapha (northwestern Thailand), date...
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Thailand and Laos, located in the center of Mainland Southeast Asia (MSEA), harbor diverse ethnolinguistic groups encompassing all five language families of MSEA: Tai-Kadai (TK), Austroasiatic (AA), Sino-Tibetan (ST), Hmong-Mien (HM) and Austronesian (AN). Previous genetic studies of Thai/Lao populations have focused almost exclusively on uniparent...
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The hill tribes of northern Thailand comprise nine officially recognized groups: the Austroasiatic-speaking (AA) Khmu, Htin and Lawa; the Hmong-Mien-speaking (HM) IuMien and Hmong; and the Sino-Tibetan-speaking (ST) Akha, Karen, Lahu and Lisu. Except the Lawa, the rest of the hill tribes migrated into their present habitats only very recently. The...
Preprint
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Thailand and Laos, located in the center of Mainland Southeast Asia (MSEA), harbor diverse ethnolinguistic groups encompassing all five language families of MSEA: Tai-Kadai (TK), Austroasiatic (AA), Sino-Tibetan (ST), Hmong-Mien (HM) and Austronesian (AN). Previous genetic studies of Thai/Lao populations have focused almost exclusively on uniparent...
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Contemporary archaeologists can no longer focus only on scientific research, they must also work with different interest groups whose use of archaeology may have positive and negative consequences. The dichotomy of foreigner versus local has been prominent in the discourse of the post-modern era. Archaeologists seem to be aware of their ethical and...
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The Hmong-Mien (HM) and Sino-Tibetan (ST) speaking groups are known as hill tribes in Thailand; they were the subject of the first studies to show an impact of patrilocality vs. matrilocality on patterns of mitochondrial (mt) DNA vs. male-specific portion of the Y chromosome (MSY) variation. However, HM and ST groups have not been studied in as muc...
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Hanging Coffin is a unique and ancient burial custom which had been practiced in southern China, Southeast Asia and near Oceania regions for more than 3,000 years. Here, we conducted mitochondrial whole genome analyses of 41 human remains sampled from 13 Hanging Coffin sites in southern China and northern Thailand, which were dated between ∼2,500 t...
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Full-text available
Three taxa within the subfamily Caprinae (Himalayan goral Naemorhedus goral, Chinese goral Naemorhedus griseus, and Sumatran serow Capricornis sumatraensis) live in the mountainous upland forests of Southeast Asia, where they are considered as vulnerable or near threatened species. Co-occurrences between these two recognized genera have been docume...
Article
This paper examines the changes in taxonomic diversity and demography of faunal assemblages hunted by the human inhabitants of the Tham Lod and Ban Rai rockshelters in the Pang Mapha highlands of northwestern Thailand during the Late Pleistocene (MIS 2-1) to Terminal Pleistocene-Early Holocene. Evidence from these excavated sites indicates that env...
Preprint
The Hmong-Mien (HM) and Sino-Tibetan (ST) speaking groups are known as hill tribes in Thailand; they were the subject of the first studies to show an impact of patrilocality vs. matrilocality on patterns of mitochondrial (mt) DNA vs. male-specific portion of the Y chromosome (MSY) variation. However, HM and ST groups have not been studied in as muc...
Article
Full-text available
We describe the first dental proteomic profiles of Iron Age individuals (c2000‐1000 years B.P), collected from the site of Long Long Rak rock shelter (LLR) in northwest Thailand. A bias toward the preservation of the positively charged aromatic, and polar amino acids is observed. It is evident that the 212 proteins identified (2 peptide, FDR <1%) c...
Article
The origin of the domestication of chicken Gallus gallus domesticus is still a subject of debate. It principally originates from the red junglefowl G. gallus, which is distributed throughout Southeast Asia and South China. However, the prehistoric exploitation of chicken and red junglefowl in Southeast Asia has remained unclear due to a small numbe...
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The human occupation history of Southeast Asia (SEA) remains heavily debated. Current evidence suggests that SEA was occupied by Hòabìnhian hunter-gatherers until ~4000 years ago, when farming economies developed and expanded, restricting foraging groups to remote habitats. Some argue that agricultural development was indigenous; others favor the “...
Article
The Late Pleistocene archeological site of Tham Lod Rockshelter has yielded a large number of animal remains associated with a rich lithic assemblage with a Hoabinian facies. The well-preserved collection of Caprinae dental material was analyzed and attributed to three Caprinae species. The morphological and metrical analysis allowed the identifica...
Preprint
Full-text available
Two distinct population models have been put forward to explain present-day human diversity in Southeast Asia. The first model proposes long-term continuity (Regional Continuity model) while the other suggests two waves of dispersal (Two Layer model). Here, we use whole-genome capture in combination with shotgun sequencing to generate 25 ancient hu...
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Creating a facial appearance for individuals from the distant past is often highly problematic, even when verified methods are used. This is especially so in the case of non-European individuals, as the reference populations used to estimate the face tend to be heavily biased towards the average facial variation of recent people of European descent...
Chapter
Thailand has a long and complex history regarding the investigation of the past through the material remains discovered during the “pre-modern era,” long before the introduction of scientific archaeology in the 19th century. Archaeological tradition in Thailand developed differently than in the west, with close ties to Buddhism and the formation of...
Article
This study reports on an analysis of human adaptations to sea level changes in the tropical monsoonal environment of Peninsula Thailand. We excavated Khao Toh Chong rockshelter in Krabi and recorded archaeological deposits spanning the last 13,000 years. A suite of geoarchaeological methods suggest largely uninterrupted deposition, against a backdr...
Article
Tham Lod (Pang Mapha district, Mae Hong Son Province) is one of the rockshelters in the limestone karst of north-western Thailand. The site was excavated from 2002 to 2006 under the direction of one of us (R.S.) in the context of The Highland Archeological Project. The stratigraphical sequence of the site provided dates ranging from late Pleistocen...
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Pottery found at Spirit Cave, Thailand, has been claimed as among the earliest ceramics in the world - a radiocarbon date of 7500 BP being obtained from associated charcoal. However radiocarbon dating of organic resin found on some of the sherds gave a date of around 3000 BP. This is another example of improved precision in dating by pin-pointing t...
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The zooarchaeological record of a recently excavated rockshelter site in peninsular Thailand is summarized. Detailed identification of mammalian, reptilian, piscean and molluscan taxa indicate a unique foraging pattern of prehistoric humans throughout the late-Pleistocene to Holocene. KEY WORDS: vertebrate and molluscan assemblages, late-Pleistocen...
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Archaeology, as part of cultural heritage management, has recently become very important for economic development in Thailand and similarly economically disadvantaged countries elsewhere in Southeast Asia (Bautista 2007; Fine Arts Department 1988; Paz 2007; Peleggi 2002; Shoocongdej 1992). This seems to be linked to the popularity and growth of tou...
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The practices of professional archaeology in Southeast Asia have generally been inherited from and influenced by western archaeologists and amateurs since the eighteenth century. In the past decades, contemporary Southeast Asian archaeology has incorporated western theories and methodologies into its own archaeological practices. At the same time,...
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This paper reports the chronology of the styles of the log coffin heads from Bo Krai Cave and Ban Rai Rockshelter in northern Thailand using tree-ring data. This is the first attempt to apply dendrochronology in archaeology fields for age determination, which otherwise only C-14 has been used. The study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that th...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports the chronology of the styles of the log coffin heads from Bo Krai Cave and Ban Rai Rockshelter in northern Thailand using tree-ring data. This is the first attempt to apply dendrochronology in archaeology fields for age determination, which otherwise only C-14 has been used. The study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that th...
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Full-text available
This paper presents a multifaceted study of a collection of stoneware ceramic vessels in the Guthe Collection of the Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan. These vessels, recovered in the Philippines but manufactured in multiple production sites across East and Southeast Asia, provide insights into premodern economic interactions and marit...
Article
No First presented at an August 2001 national meeting of the American Chemical Society, material in this book provides a cross-section of current research in the area of chemistry applied to archaeological questions. Examples are given of the use of analytical methods in the study of a variety of archaeological materials, and inferences that can be...
Chapter
relative time period: Follows the Southeast Asia Upper Paleolithic tradition and precedes the Southeast Asia Neolithic and Bronze Age tradition.
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This paper investigates forager mobility organization in seasonal tropical environments and, speciically, how mobility strategies have affected subsistence and settlement organization. The proposed model, based on cross-cultural comparisons, suggests that two mobility organizational systems exist in seasonal tropical environments: residential mobil...