Ranjana Pal

Ranjana Pal
Wildlife Institute of India | WII · Department of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology

P.h.D Wildlife Science

About

19
Publications
9,638
Reads
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94
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
94 Citations
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Background Large-scale changes in habitat conditions due to human modifications and climate change require management practices to consider how species communities can alter amidst these changes. Understanding species interactions across the gradient of space, anthropogenic pressure, and season provide the opportunity to anticipate possible dynamic...
Article
Background: Populations exhibit signatures of local adaptive traits due to spatial and environmental heterogeneity resulting in microevolution. The blue sheep is widely distributed across the high Asian mountains and are the snow leopard’s principal prey species. These mountains differ in their evolutionary history due to differential glaciation an...
Article
Full-text available
The woolly wolf Canis lupus chanco is increasingly being accepted as a unique taxon that needs immediate protection and management; however, information on its ecology remains limited across its range. We used camera trapping data set of 4 years (2015-2019) to investigate seasonal activity patterns and space use and assessed woolly wolf food habits...
Article
Full-text available
The Eurasian Otter Lutra lutra is an elusive, solitary animal that has one of the widest distributions of all palearctic mammals. Once widely distributed in Asia, the Eurasian Otter population is now vulnerable to urbanization, pollution, poaching, and dam construction. Eurasian Otter distribution in the Indian Himalayan rivers is little explored,...
Article
Human modification and habitat fragmentation significantly impact large carnivores requiring large, connected habitats to persist in a landscape. Understanding species responses to such change and the protection of critical areas and connectivity they provide is essential when planning effective conservation strategies. Our study examines the spati...
Article
Full-text available
Throughout the Himalaya, mountain ungulates are threatened by hunting for meat and body parts, habitat loss, and competition with livestock. Accurate population estimates are important for conservation management but most of the available methods to estimate ungulate densities are difficult to implement in mountainous terrain. Here, we tested the e...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the distribution of wildlife species and their response to diverse anthropogenic pressures is important for conservation planning and management of wildlife space in human-dominated landscapes. Assessments of anthropogenic impacts on mammals of the Indian Himalayan Region have mostly been limited to locations inside protected areas. W...
Article
Full-text available
Of the sub-species of Holarctic wolf, the Woolly wolf (Canis lupus chanco) is uniquely adapted to atmospheric hypoxia and widely distributed across the Himalaya, Qinghai Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and Mongolia. Taxonomic ambiguity still exists for this sub-species because of complex evolutionary history anduse of limited wild samples across its range in...
Chapter
An understanding of the heterogeneity, or nonrandomness, in the distribution of species on Earth is one of the central goals in the ecological sciences and constitutes the collective science of Biogeography. This multidisciplinary branch of science incorporates elements from widely disparate disciplines such as biology, ecology, geography, remote s...
Article
The woolly flying squirrel ( Eupetaurus cinereus Thomas, 1888) is one of the least-known endangered mammals of the Himalayas and recorded only from few localities at 2400–3600 m in Hindu Kush and North-Western Himalayas. We report first confirmed record of this species from Upper Bhagirathi Basin, Uttarakhand, Western Himalaya. The squirrel was pho...
Article
Camera trap photographs of solitary individuals of Asiatic wild dog or dholes (Cuon alpinus, Pallas 1811) have been recorded from Kheda Tal area in Uttarkashi district of Uttarakhand. This is the first photographic confirmation of the presence of this species in the Himalayan habitats of Uttarakhand. The presence of dholes here seems to be confined...
Article
Full-text available
In human-populated landscapes worldwide, domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) are the most abundant terrestrial carnivore. Although dogs have been used for the protection of livestock from wild carnivores, they have also been implicated as predators of livestock. We used a combination of methods (field surveys, interview surveys, and data from se...
Chapter
Full-text available
There is an increasing demand for scientific information on the state of environment particularly biodiversity in different regions of the world. While information is scanty for poorly studied regions, there is substantial information for some regions but most of it is not readily available as either it is widely scattered or largely unpublished. I...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We assessed the distribution and broad-scale resource utilization patterns of mountain ungulates in Bhagirath basin (ranging from 500m to 5000m) of Uttarakhand, India. . A total of eight ungulates species were captured (1197 photographs) in 10,167 trap nights effort. Barking deer Muntiacus vaginalis (11.27 ±3.79) was the most photo-captured (#/100...
Article
Full-text available
First photographic evidence of Himalayan brown bear in Uttarakhand is reported from Harsil-Kiyarkoti areas of Bhagirathi Basin, Uttarakhand, India in 2016
Book
The year 2010 marked the shifting of the University campus from Kashmere Gate to Dwarka. From the hustle-bustle and crowded streets of Old Delhi, it occupied to a more peaceful and greener settings. The presence of plantation sites, agricultural areas and water bodies in the vicinity along with the green belt of the campus has proved to be a great...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
1) GCM or Combination of GCMs for future prediction of species habitat suitability under RCP4.5 and 8.5 in Himalayas

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The National Mission for Sustaining the Himalayan Ecosystem (NMSHE) is one of the eight National missions which form the core of India’s first National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) launched in 2008 and is headed by the Prime Minister’s Council on Climate Change. Climate change has become a major driver of ecological patterns and processes, and in determining well-being of human societies across the globe. The effects of climate change are pronounced in places such as the Himalaya, where the network of snow-clad mountains, ice-peaks, high intensity drainage and precipitation characterizes the bio-social landscape. The NMSHE aims to offer practical adaptation strategies based on primary and secondary data and advanced analyses. NSMHE has six task forces, involving specialized Institutions for each task. These Institutions are Wildlife Institute of India (Micro flora and fauna and wildlife & animal populations), Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology (Natural & geological wealth), National Institute of Hydrology (Water, ice. Snow, including glaciers), G B Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development (Forest resources & plant biodiversity), Jawaharlal Nehru University (Traditional Knowledge Systems) and Indian Council of Agricultural Research (Himalayan Agriculture). Wildlife Institute of India focuses on Assessment and Monitoring of Climate Change Effects on Wildlife Species and Ecosystems for Developing Adaptation and Mitigation Strategies in the Indian Himalayan Region (IHR). The thematic areas identified under this taskforce are: (A) Terrestrial System, (B) Aquatic System, (C) Human Ecology, and (D) Spatial Ecology, and include assessments of: (a) animal species/communities diversity, distribution, abundance (b) wildlife habitats, ecosystems, and ecosystem services; (c) anthropogenic and climate change impacts on wildlife and ecosystems through scenario building and visualization; (d) vulnerability of species / habitats to climate change; and prioritization of species/taxa and sites for monitoring. The expected outputs/outcomes from this project shall be: Cohesive and inter-operable spatial database on fauna and their habitats, and ecosystems in the IHR; Vulnerability Indices for species (fauna), wildlife habitats and ecosystems in the IHR; Establishment of monitoring protocols for long-term climate change monitoring; Development of predictive modeling and visualization scenarios in context of climate change and anthropogenic drivers including validated projections based on pilot studies, enhancement in research capacities of WII and collaborating partners; and Formulation of policy briefs and development of ‘Wildlife Watch’ for indicator/endangered species for regular monitoring by stakeholders.