Randy Colvin

Randy Colvin
Northeastern University | NEU · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

42
Publications
33,140
Reads
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5,632
Citations
Citations since 2017
4 Research Items
1655 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
There has been much work on player modeling using game behavioral data collected. Many of the previous research projects that targeted this goal used aggregate game statistics as features to develop behavior models using both statistical and machine learning techniques. While existing methods have already led to interesting findings, we suspect tha...
Article
Despite decades of empirical research, a deceptively simple question remains unanswered: Is guilt good? Whereas some researchers assert that routine experiences of guilt (i.e., “trait guilt”) are maladaptive and indicative of poor psychological adjustment, others assert trait guilt to be adaptive and indicative of a prosocial disposition. In the cu...
Article
The current research presents a general framework for assessing the subjective perception of situations. The framework was used to assess freely listed situations relevant to participants’ daily lives as well as laboratory situations in which behavior was objectively assessed. Exploratory factor analyses revealed five common situation dimensions th...
Article
Full-text available
Player modeling is an important concept that has gained much attention in game research due to its utility in developing adaptive techniques to target better designs for engagement and retention. Previous work has explored modeling individual differences using machine learning algorithms per- formed on aggregated game actions. However, players' ind...
Article
Objectives: The present research is concerned with the relation between accuracy in judging targets' affective states and accuracy in judging the same targets' personality traits. In two studies, we test the link between these two types of accuracy with the prediction that accuracy of judging traits and of judging states will be associated when fu...
Article
Objective: Despite decades of empirical research, conclusions regarding the adaptiveness of dispositional guilt and shame are mixed. We use meta-analysis to summarize the empirical literature and clarify these ambiguities. Specifically, we evaluate how guilt and shame are uniquely related to prosocial orientation and, in doing so, highlight the su...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Understanding player behavior through telemetry logs is an important yet unresolved problem. Interpreting the meaning of players' low-level behaviors over time is important due to its utility in (a) developing a more adaptive and personalized game experience, (b) uncovering game design issues, and (c) understanding the human cognitive processes in...
Article
The relation between narcissism and other-derogation has been examined primarily in the context of ego threat. In three studies, we investigated whether narcissistic individuals derogate others in the absence of ego threat. In Study 1, 79 judges watched four videotaped dyadic interactions and rated the personality of the same four people. In Study...
Article
Full-text available
Successful negotiation involves satisfying two seemingly contradictory goals: maximizing personal gain while forming a positive interpersonal relationship with negotiation counterparts. We hypothesized that individuals high on narcissism would gain economically but loose interpersonally in a negotiation. Seventy MBA students engaged in a negotiatio...
Article
Full-text available
Most research on narcissism and person perception has used strangers as perceivers. However, research has demonstrated that strangers' ratings are influenced by narcissists' stylish appearance (Back, Schmukle, & Egloff, 2010). In the present study, we recruited participants and their close friends, individuals whose close relationship should immuni...
Article
Full-text available
To determine whether tolerance of dioptric spherical defocus is related to measures of personality. Clinical observations suggest that there is individual variability in tolerance of blur. A computer-controlled Badal optometer was used to measure just-noticeable blur and just-objectionable blur responses to positive lens defocus. Blur tolerance was...
Article
The authors extended the circumplex structure of emotion to naturally unfolding affective social behaviors. The emotion circumplex describes the circular spacing of emotions and has been harvested from covariation patterns among emotion words, self-reported emotional experience, and judgments of posed facial expression. The distance between emotion...
Article
The accuracy of first impressions was examined by investigating judged construct (negative affect, positive affect, the Big five personality variables, intelligence), exposure time (5, 20, 45, 60, and 300 s), and slice location (beginning, middle, end). Three hundred and thirty four judges rated 30 targets. Accuracy was defined as the correlation b...
Article
Full-text available
Despite ongoing theoretical interest in the accuracy of self-knowledge and its implications for mental health, few researchers have yet to tackle this topic directly. This may be due, in part, to several factors that make assessing individual differences in accurate self-knowledge especially difficult. In this article, we present a method for the a...
Article
Are those who are more invested in developing and maintaining interpersonal relationships able to provide more accurate judgments of others' personality characteristics? Previous research has produced mixed findings. In the present study, a conceptual framework was presented and methods were used that overcome many of the problems encountered in pa...
Article
Full-text available
In the present study we investigated whether the personality trait of assertiveness can be judged accurately, which cues are used to judge assertiveness, and how cue utilization is related to accuracy. We additionally assessed whether perceiver and/or target gender moderate any of these relationships. Participants (72 females and 36 males) watched...
Article
We examined the personality and behavioral correlates associated with the tendency to elicit self-disclosure from others as assessed by the Opener Scale (Miller, Berg, & Archer, 1983). Participants completed the Opener Scale and were videotaped in two dyadic interactions with an opposite-sex stranger. Friends rated participants' personality charact...
Article
Full-text available
The Riverside Behavioral Q-sort (RBQ) is a flexible technique for gathering a wide-ranging description of the behavior of individuals in dyadic social interaction. Ratings of RBQ items can attain adequate reliability to reflect behavioral effects of experimental manipulations and to manifest meaningful correlations with a variety of personality cha...
Article
do other people view you the same way you view yourself / most people find this to be an interesting question, for 2 basic reasons / 1st, the self that a person presents to others, and the way that self is perceived by others, importantly influences how those others treat him or her and how the person views him or herself / whether one is viewed po...
Article
In this article we compare the accuracy of personality judgements by the self and by knowledgeable others. Self- and acquaintance judgements of general personality attributes were used to predict general, videotaped behavioral criteria. Results slightly favored the predictive validity of personality judgements made by single acquaintances over self...
Article
M. Zuckerman and C. R. Knee (see record 199601769-012) contend that the relationship we reported between self-enhancement and psychological maladjustment (C. R. Colvin, J. Block, D. C. Funder; see record 1995-33022-001) is "not warranted" because a difference score was used to operationalize self-enhancement. In this article we discuss the issues...
Article
In this article we compare the accuracy of personality judgments by the self and by knowledgeable others. Self- and acquaintance judgments of general personality attributes were used to predict general, videotaped behavioral criteria. Results slightly favored the predictive validity of personality judgments made by single acquaintances over self-ju...
Article
Full-text available
The relation between overly positive self-evaluations and psychological adjustment was examined. Three studies, two based on longitudinal data and another on laboratory data, contrasted self-descriptions of personality with observer ratings (trained examiners or friends) to index self-enhancement. In the longitudinal studies, self-enhancement was a...
Article
Full-text available
The proposition recently offered by S. E. Taylor and J. D. Brown (1988) that positive illusions foster mental health has garnered considerable attention and acceptance. However, the significant theoretical and applied implications of their view for mental health require a critical evaluation of their argument. An examination of the logic and empiri...
Article
The differing interpretations of the relation between positive illusions and well-being held by S. E. Taylor and J. D. Brown (see PA, Vols 75:16903 and 41068) and by C. R. Colvin and J. Block (see record 1994-41047-001) cannot be reconciled. The authors urge motivated readers to evaluate their respective formulations closely and develop their own c...
Article
ABSTRACT Research has recently demonstrated that the personalities of some individuals are more accurately judged than others, and that these “judgable” persons possess a coherent and identifiable personality structure (Colvin, 1993). In this article, four indices of judgability, based on personality descriptions provided by trained examiners, frie...
Article
Full-text available
"Judgability" discriminates people who are open and knowable from those who are closed and enigmatic. The current study investigated this individual difference characteristic and its personality and behavioral correlates. Subjects (N = 164) were videotaped interacting with a partner of the opposite sex. They completed several personality measures,...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research indicates that happiness, or affective well-being, is related primarily to the frequency, not to the intensity, of positive affect (PA). The question arises as to why intense positive affect (PI) is not a larger contributor to subjective well-being. Whether processes that yield PI also produce intense negative affect was examined. S...
Article
Full-text available
The structure of subjective well-being has been conceptualized as consisting of two major components: the emotional or affective component and the judgmental or cognitive component (Diener, 1984; Veenhoven, 1984). The judgmental component has also been conceptualized as life satisfaction (Andrews & Withey, 1976). Although the affective component of...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that interjudge agreement in personality ratings increases with acquaintanceship. The present study sought to replicate and extend this finding by investigating the relation between acquaintanceship and behavioral prediction. A total of 138 undergraduate targets were videotaped while interacting with an opposite-sex partne...
Article
Full-text available
In a study exploring the cross-situational consistency of behavior, 140 undergraduate Ss were video-taped in each of 3 laboratory settings, and personality descriptions of these Ss were obtained from friends and acquaintances. Analyses focused on the degree to which Ss maintained consistent patterns of behavior across laboratory settings and betwee...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the effect of acquaintanceship on interjudge agreement in personality ratings. Approximately 150 undergraduates described their own personalities using the Q-sort. They were also described by two close acquaintances and by two "strangers" who knew them only via a single, spontaneous interaction viewed on videotape. The effect of acquain...
Article
Purpose: Last year, we reported that tolerance of blur (spherical defocus) and personality were related in a "young" population. We replicated this finding in a presbyopic population and further refined the personality questionnaire. Methods: A computer-controlled Badal optometer was used to measure "just-noticeable" blur (depth of focus) and "obje...
Article
Printout. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1991. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 97-105). Available on microfilm from University Microfilms.

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