Randi Griffin

Randi Griffin
Duke University | DU · Department of Evolutionary Anthropology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

35
Publications
4,414
Reads
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502
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - May 2015
Duke University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Primate Sexuality
September 2014 - December 2014
Duke University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Human Health in Evolutionary Perspective
May 2014 - May 2014
AnthroTree Workshop on Phylogenetic Comparative Methods
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Taught module “Phylogenetic generalized least squares, phylogenetic signal, and maximum likelihood”
Education
September 2013 - May 2017
Duke University
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Anthropology
September 2006 - May 2010
Harvard University
Field of study
  • Human Evolutionary Biology

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Despite increasing appreciation for parasitism as an important component of primate ecology and evolution, surprisingly few studies have demonstrated the costs of helminth parasitism in primates. Detecting parasite-related costs in primates is particularly difficult because it requires detailed, long-term data on individual host reproductive succes...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the global distribution and public health consequences of Taenia tapeworms, the life cycles of taeniids infecting wildlife hosts remain largely undescribed. The larval stage of Taenia serialis commonly parasitizes rodents and lagomorphs, but has been reported in a wide range of hosts that includes geladas (Theropithecus gelada), primates en...
Data
Full adapted protocol for the detection of Taenia antigen in dried urine. (DOCX)
Article
Smaers, Mongle & Kandler (2016) (Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 118: 74–98) introduced a new phylogenetic comparative method, multiple-variance Brownian motion (mvBM), for reconstructing ancestral states given a phylogenetic tree and continuous trait data. The authors conducted a simulation study and argued that mvBM outperforms constan...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the distribution of arthropod vectors across a landscape is important in determining the risk for vector-borne disease. This has been well explored for ticks, but not for mosquitoes, despite their importance in the transmission of a variety of pathogens. This study examined the importance of habitat, habitat edges, and the scale at whi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Smaers, Mongle & Kandler (2016) (Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 118: 78-94) introduced a new phylogenetic comparative method, multiple variance Brownian motion (mvBM), for reconstructing ancestral states given a phylogenetic tree and continuous trait data. The authors conducted a simulation study and argued that mvBM outperforms constan...
Article
Full-text available
Phylogenetic comparative methods (PCMs) use data on species traits and phylogenetic relationships to shed light on evolutionary questions. Recently, Smaers and Vinicius suggested a new PCM, Independent Evolution (IE), which purportedly employs a novel model of evolution based on Felsenstein's Adaptive Peak Model. The authors found that IE improves...
Data
Nexus file of primate phylogeny used for simulations. (NEX)
Data
R code for IE algorithm. (R)
Data
R code for PIDC algorithm. (R)
Article
Full-text available
• White forms of typically pigmented flowers are one of the most common polymorphisms in flowering plants. Although the range of genetic changes that give rise to white phenotypes is well known from model systems, few studies have identified causative mutations in natural populations.• Here we combine genetic studies, in vitro enzyme assays, and bi...
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Article
Full-text available
Many studies have suggested that ecosystem conservation protects human and wildlife populations against infectious disease. We tested this hypothesis using data on primates and their parasites. First, we tested for relationships between species' resilience to human disturbance and their parasite richness, prevalence and immune defences, but found n...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how parasites are transmitted to new species is of great importance for human health, agriculture and conservation. However, it is still unclear why some parasites are shared by many species, while others have only one host. Using a new measure of 'phylogenetic host specificity', we find that most primate parasites with more than one...
Article
Activity period plays a central role in studies of primate origins and adaptations, yet fundamental questions remain concerning the evolutionary history of primate activity period. Lemurs are of particular interest because they display marked variation in activity period, with some species exhibiting completely nocturnal or diurnal lifestyles, and...
Article
Full-text available
Living in a large social group is thought to increase disease risk in wild animal populations, but comparative studies have provided mixed support for this prediction. Here, we take a social network perspective to investigate whether patterns of social contact within groups influence parasite risk. Specifically, increased modularity (i.e. sub-group...

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