Rana Abu-Zhaya

Rana Abu-Zhaya
University of Plymouth | UoP · School of Psychology

PhD. Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

About

9
Publications
2,223
Reads
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47
Citations
Introduction
Rana Abu-Zhaya is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Developmental Psychology at the University of Plymouth. She studies early language development and can be contacted at ranaabuzhaya@gmail.com.
Additional affiliations
January 2021 - present
University of Plymouth
Position
  • Lecturer
October 2018 - December 2020
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2015 - August 2016
Purdue University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2014 - August 2018
Purdue University
Field of study
  • Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences
August 2012 - August 2014
Purdue University
Field of study
  • Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences
October 2005 - February 2009
University of Haifa
Field of study
  • Communication Sciences and Disorders

Publications

Publications (9)
Preprint
Caregivers’ touches which occur alongside words and utterances can aid in the detection of word and phrase boundaries and the mapping of wordforms to meanings. This study examines whether caregivers attune their use of touches occurring with speech to infants’ age. Using a multi-modal corpus of 35 Korean mother-child dyads across three age groups (...
Article
Full-text available
Meaning in language emerges from multiple words, and children are sensitive to multi‐word frequency from infancy. While children successfully use cues from single words to generate linguistic predictions, it is less clear whether and how they use multi‐word sequences to guide real‐time language processing and whether they form predictions on the ba...
Article
In the first year of life, the ability to engage in sustained synchronous interactions develops as infants learn to match social partner behaviors and sequentially regulate their behaviors in response to others. Difficulties developing competence in these early social building blocks can impact later language skills, joint attention, and emotion re...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Caregivers may show greater use of nonauditory signals in interactions with children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH). This study explored the frequency of maternal touch and the temporal alignment of touch with speech in the input to children who are DHH and age-matched peers with normal hearing. Method We gathered audio and video re...
Article
Full-text available
Infants' experiences are defined by the presence of concurrent streams of perceptual information in social environments. Touch from caregivers is an especially pervasive feature of early development. Using three lab experiments and a corpus of naturalistic caregiver-infant interactions, we examined the relevance of touch in supporting infants' lear...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Human children outperform artificial learners because the former quickly acquire a multimodal, syntactically informed, and ever-growing lexicon with little evidence. Most of this lexicon is unlabelled and processed with unsupervised mechanisms, leading to robust and generalizable knowledge. In this paper, we summarize results related to 4-month-old...
Article
Full-text available
Both touch and speech independently have been shown to play an important role in infant development. However, little is known about how they may be combined in the input to the child. We examined the use of touch and speech together by having mothers read their 5-month-olds books about body parts and animals. Results suggest that speech+touch multi...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates the interaction between two people, namely, a caregiver and an infant. A particular type of action in human interaction known as “touch” is described. We propose a method to detect “touch event” that uses color and motion features to track the hand positions of the caregiver. Our approach addresses the problem of hand occlus...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
To assess whether being bilingual makes people better at taking others' perspectives, and why this might be the case.