Ramesh Boonratana

Ramesh Boonratana
Mahidol University | MU · Mahidol University International College

PhD

About

170
Publications
65,623
Reads
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1,246
Citations
Citations since 2016
59 Research Items
729 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Introduction
Ramesh Boonratana currently works at the Mahidol University International College, Mahidol University.
Additional affiliations
November 2006 - present
Mahidol University
Position
  • Managing Director
January 1997 - September 1997
Chiang Mai University
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (170)
Article
Full-text available
Primates, represented by 521 species, are distributed across 91 countries primarily in the Neotropic, Afrotropic, and Indo-Malayan realms. Primates inhabit a wide range of habitats and play critical roles in sustaining healthy ecosystems that benefit human and nonhuman communities. Approximately 68% of primate species are threatened with extinction...
Article
Full-text available
Interview with Ramesh Boonratana, a conservation practitioner who works in biodiversity conservation and ecosystem protection and is a faculty member at Mahidol University.
Article
Full-text available
Threats to biodiversity are well documented. However, to effectively conserve species and their habitats, we need to know which conservation interventions do (or do not) work. Evidence-based conservation evaluates interventions within a scientific framework. The Conservation Evidence project has summarized thousands of studies testing conservation...
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing efforts to conserve the Asian primates are severely challenged by increasing rates of habitat loss and fragmentation. Underlying drivers such as rapid economic and population growth throughout much of South, East, and Southeast Asia have confined several populations of Asian primates to isolated fragments. Conservation efforts for these pri...
Article
Full-text available
Primates occur in 90 countries, but four-Brazil, Madagascar, Indonesia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)-harbor 65% of the world's primate species (439) and 60% of these primates are Threatened, Endangered, or Critically Endangered (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017-3). Considering their importance for global primate conservati...
Article
Full-text available
Primates occur in 90 countries, but four-Brazil, Madagascar, Indonesia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)-harbor 65% of the world's primate species (439) and 60% of these primates are Threatened, Endangered, or Critically Endangered (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017-3). Considering their importance for global primate conservati...
Article
Full-text available
Primates occur in 90 countries, but four-Brazil, Madagascar, Indonesia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)-harbor 65% of the world's primate species (439) and 60% of these primates are Threatened, Endangered, or Critically Endangered (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017-3). Considering their importance for global primate conservati...
Data
Fig. S3. Trends in the growth of the cultivated areas devoted to roots and tubers, maize, and rice paddy production and in two important arboreal food crops in DRC. Also shown is the growth trend in the harvest of hardwoods. Available at http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#compare (crops processed) (accessed 1 April 2017). Note: starting year may differ...
Data
Fig. S1. Expansion of agricultural land for the period 2001 to 2015 in Brazil, Indonesia, Madagascar and DRC. Available at FAOStats http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#compare (accessed 10 February 2018). See Text S1 for limitations of the FAO data.
Data
Fig. S2. Trends in the growth of cattle populations and in the production of some of the most important agricultural commodities in Brazil. Available at http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data (accessed 14 February 2018; for a definition of the category Roundwood nonconiferous see http://www.fao.org/waicent/faostat/forestry/products.htm#S2; http://www....
Data
Fig. S5. Trends in the area devoted to the cultivation of rice, oil palm, natural rubber and the increase in the volume of roundwood extraction in Indonesia. Available at http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#compare (crops processed) (accessed 5 April 2017). See Text S1 for limitations of the FAO data.
Data
Fig. S4. Trends in the growth of cultivated areas including roots and tubers, maize, and rice paddy production in Madagascar. Also shown is the growth in the extraction of hardwoods. Available at http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#compare (crops processed) (accessed 1 April 2017). See Text S1 for limitations of the FAO data.
Data
Fig. S6. Optimistic, business as usual, and pessimistic scenarios of expected spatial conflict between agricultural expansion and primate distributions in the 21st century in Brazil, DRC, Madagascar and Indonesia. The table at the bottom shows the predicted agricultural expansion values (%) to take place by 2050 and 2100 under each of the three sce...
Data
Table S2. Number of primate species, genera and families currently present in Brazil, DRC, Madagascar and Indonesia. Also shown is the number of species threatened and with declining populations. Source of data: IUCN, 2017 http://www.iucnredlist.org (consulted February 13th, 2018). Three families are shared by DRC and Indonesia: Lorisidae, Cercopit...
Data
Table S5. Gross Domestic Product Per Capita (GDPPC) and the Human Development Index for the 25 most developed nations in the world and for Brazil, DRC, Madagascar and Indonesia. Source HDI: http://hdr.undp.org/en/countries/profiles/COD (accessed 5 February 2018) Source GDPPC: http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.PCAP.CD?contextual=max&locatio...
Data
Fig. S7. Frequency distribution of the area of the ranges of primate species (blue) and the area of their ranges that overlap with protected areas. (A) Brazil, (B) DRC, (C) Madagascar and (D) Indonesia.
Data
Table S1. Biological richness of four major vertebrate groups in Brazil, DRC, Madagascar and Indonesia. Source: IUCN, 2017 http://www.iucnredlist.org–consulted August 2017.
Data
Table S3. Tree cover loss (>30% canopy cover) for the period 2001 to 2016. Source: Global Forest Watch (http://www.globalforestwatch.org (accessed 11 January 2018). All areas are in ha.
Data
Table S4. Expansion estimates of agricultural land in Brazil, Indonesia, Madagascar and DRC for the period 2001 to 2015. Also shown is agricultural land as percent of the country’s land area. Source of data: FAOStats http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data (accessed 12 February 2018). Increases or decreases from year to year can be calculated by subtra...
Article
Full-text available
Although a widespread species, very little is known of the distribution of the rare and primitive wild Snow Banana Ensete glaucum (Roxb.) Cheesman in Southeast Asia, and for that reason I describe a coincidental discovery of this species in central Laos.
Article
Full-text available
The flat-headed cat Prionailurus planiceps is classified as one of the most threatened cat species in the world. Its range is restricted to southern Thailand, peninsular Malaysia and the two largest Sunda Islands, Borneo and Sumatra. Its association with wetlands and lowland areas puts great pressure on this species, because these habitats are most...
Article
Full-text available
Banded linsang Prionodon linsang is restricted to Sundaic South-east Asia and inhabits a wide altitudinal range. It occurs widely in Borneo, including all political units except perhaps South Kalimantan, with many recent records. It has never been studied in the field. Usually, it is recorded only once or a few times on any given cameratrap or spot...
Article
Full-text available
Small-toothed palm civet Arctogalidia trivirgata occurs widely across Borneo. Eighty-two spatially precise records were used to model its distribution on the island. While the model predicts some regions of low suitability, the scatter of records (mostly insufficiently spatially precise for use in the model) within them and the generally low releva...
Article
Full-text available
The banded civet Hemigalus derbyanus is a small, little-known civet with a geographical range comprising Indonesia (Kalimantan, Sumatra and some associated islands), Malaysia, Brunei, peninsular Myanmar and peninsular Thailand. Habitat loss and degradation are the main threats to the species leading to its classification as globally Vulnerable by T...
Article
Full-text available
The Malay civet Viverra tangalunga is a small carnivore occurring on several Indonesian islands, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore. The Malay civet occurs in diverse habitats, including primary and logged forest, and disturbed habitats near villages. It is listed by The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as globally Least Concern; however, t...
Article
Full-text available
The common palm civet Paradoxurus hermaphroditus is a small carnivore occurring in a broad array of habitats on Borneo, including logged and unlogged forest, cultivated land, and the outskirts of villages and towns. It is assigned incomplete legal protection in Indonesia and Brunei Darussalam. In addition, the recent, rapidly expanding increase in...
Article
Full-text available
The yellow-throated marten Martes flavigula is a wide-ranging species across much of Asia. It is active mainly during the day, is semi-arboreal and has an omnivorous diet. On Borneo, it has a wide elevation range, from coastal lowland to lower montane habitat of 1700 m a.s.l. Records from camera-trapping and other wildlife surveys imply a widesprea...
Article
Full-text available
Short-tailed mongoose Herpestes brachyurus is known to inhabit Borneo, Sumatra and peninsular Malaysia. Locality records show that it is widespread and probably common in at least the northern half of Borneo. Records are much sparser south of 2°N. It occurs in forest and, to a poorly clarified extent, non-forest habitats. Eighty-six spatially preci...
Article
Full-text available
The leopard cat Prionailurus bengalensis is one of the smallest cat species found on Borneo and is the most widely distributed wild cat species in Asia. It is listed on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as Least Concern. The leopard cat is known to tolerate habitat disturbance and to occur in a range of vegetation types including primary and...
Article
Full-text available
Collared mongoose Herpestes semitorquatus is known to inhabit Borneo, Sumatra and possibly the Philippines. It occurs widely in Borneo, possibly with the exception of South Kalimantan. It is very likely to occur in Brunei, although no explicit records have been traced. The pelage is typically brown or reddish-brown, with a few strongly reddish-oran...
Article
Full-text available
The binturong Arctictis binturong is a medium-sized carnivore in the civet family Viverridae with a wide geographic distribution in South-east Asia and adjacent parts of South Asia and China. Habitat loss and hunting have led to its classi cation as Vulnerable by The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. The binturong is thought to be forest depende...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the ecology of the rare marbled cat Pardofelis marmorata on Borneo. In addition, the little information that is available on the species often comes from incidental sightings. Here we use the MaxEnt algorithm to produce a habitat suitability map for this species based on a compilation of existing data. We collected 105 marbled...
Article
Full-text available
The Sunda clouded leopard Neofelis diardi is a medium sized (15–25 kg) cat, found only on the Sundaic islands of Borneo and Sumatra. In recent years intensive camera-trapping surveys in Borneo have begun to shed light on the habitat associations and basic ecology of this elusive wild cat, but its distribution on an island-wide scale remains very po...
Article
Full-text available
The otter civet Cynogale bennettii is a small carnivore of the family Viverridae, native to Indonesia (Kalimantan and Sumatra), Malaysia (Sabah, Sarawak and mainland), Brunei Darussalam and southern Thailand. Across its range, its distribution is patchy and the species has been assumed to be a wetland specialist favouring peat-swamp and fresh-water...
Article
Full-text available
Malay weasel Mustela nudipes is restricted to the Sundaic sub-region, in Borneo, Sumatra and the Malay–Thai peninsula. A distribution model suggested that the species is widespread on Borneo and occurs in a wide range of habitats. The ecology of the species is poorly known, making it difficult to predict how its populations are likely to be affecte...
Article
The Sunda stink-badger Mydaus javanensis is a small carnivore inhabiting the South-east Asian islands of Java, Sumatra, Borneo and Natuna Islands. It occurs in a wide variety of vegetation types and is presently listed by The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as Least Concern. We analysed 15 (Balanced Model) or 77 (Spatial Filtering Model) locati...
Article
Full-text available
Small-toothed palm civet Arctogalidia trivirgata occurs widely across Borneo. Eighty-two spatially precise records were used to model its distribution on the island. While the model predicts some regions of low suitability, the scatter of records (mostly insufficiently spatially precise for use in the model) within them and the generally low releva...
Article
Full-text available
Collared mongoose Herpestes semitorquatus is known to inhabit Borneo, Sumatra and possibly the Philippines. It occurs widely in Borneo, possibly with the exception of South Kalimantan. It is very likely to occur in Brunei, although no explicit records have been traced. The pelage is typically brown or reddish-brown, with a few strongly reddish-oran...
Article
Full-text available
The Sunda stink-badger Mydaus javanensis is a small carnivore inhabiting the Southeast Asian islands of Java, Sumatra, Borneo and Natuna Islands. It occurs in a wide variety of vegetation types and is presently listed by The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as Least Concern. We analysed 15 (Balanced Model) or 77 (Spatial Filtering Model) locatio...
Article
Full-text available
The Malay civet Viverra tangalunga is a small carnivore occurring on several Indonesian islands, Malaysia, the Philippines and Singapore. The Malay civet occurs in diverse habitats, including primary and logged forest, and disturbed habitats near villages. It is listed by The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as globally Least Concern; however, t...
Article
Full-text available
Banded linsang Prionodon linsang is restricted to Sundaic Southeast Asia and inhabits a wide altitudinal range. It occurs widely in Borneo, including all political units except perhaps South Kalimantan, with many recent records. It has never been studied in the field. Usually, it is recorded only once or a few times on any given camera-trap or spot...