• Home
  • Ralph K. Pedersen
Ralph K. Pedersen

Ralph K. Pedersen
The Red Sea Institute for Anthropological Research

PhD Texas A&M University

About

27
Publications
11,105
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
66
Citations
Citations since 2017
5 Research Items
31 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
Introduction
I am an archaeologist specializing in the seafaring of the eastern Mediterranean, the Red Sea, the Gulf, and the Indian Ocean. I am currently engaged in archaeological projects in Lebanon and in the Red Sea region. I have been a visiting professor at the American University of Beirut, the University of San Diego, and Philipps Universität Marburg. Currently, I am an online Faculty member in the Department of History at Southwestern A/G University where I teach courses in archaeology.
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - January 2017
The Nautical Archaeology Survey in Saudi Arabia
Position
  • Principal Investigator
Description
  • A multi-year project investigating the shipwrecks and harborages of the Saudi Red Sea coast.
September 2010 - July 2013
Philipps University of Marburg
Position
  • DAAD Visiting Professor of Nautical Archaeology
Description
  • Developed curriculum in the nautical archaeology of the pre-Classical and Classical Meditteranean and the ancient Near East.
January 2010 - June 2010
University of San Diego
Position
  • Chair
Description
  • Distinguished Visiting Professor of Anthropology and Knapp Chair of Liberal Arts Taught courses with student advising in archaeology/anthropology, and presented a public lecture connecting themes in social sciences and liberal arts.
Education
August 1991 - May 2003
Texas A&M University
Field of study
  • Anthropology/Nautical Archaeology
August 1984 - May 1991
Texas A&M University
Field of study
  • Anthropology/Nautical Archaeology
September 1979 - May 1984
Stony Brook University
Field of study
  • Anthropology and Linguistics

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
In March 2012, Philipps-Universität Marburg conducted a 12-day survey along a section of the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia reaching from Rabigh in the north to al-Shoaiba in the south. As the beginning of a five-year archaeological project, this preliminary venture sought to define the logistical situation and to discover any sites of archaeologica...
Chapter
https://www.uni-weimar.de/fileadmin/user/fak/architektur/professuren_institute/Denkmalpflege_und_Baugeschichte/Downloads/190702__Engelmann.pdf
Chapter
Results of the underwater archaeological survey at Tell el-Burak, with related information on the approaches to Sarepta, and the investigation of the shallows claimed to be the submerged city of Yarmuta.
Article
Full-text available
When one thinks of the Nabataeans, the desert comes to mind, with wind-blown sands, the red rock-cut architecture of their capital of Petra, and trade routes carrying incense from Arabia to the Mediterranean. There is, however, another aspect of the Nabataeans, one that is only now coming into focus: Seafaring. Full text at http://www.asor.org/ane...
Article
Full-text available
The finding of an underwater site in 2008, led to its excavation by the authors in 2013. The site contained a number of thick walled sherds, including one with a distinctive large handle. A number of these sherds were wedged under an ovoid stone anchor of a type typical of the Iron Age Levant. These artifacts, along with a section of a column indic...
Presentation
A narrated PowerPoint presentation on the Byzantine-era shipwreck at Black Assarca Island, Eritrea; and two shipwreck sites found through archaeological survey off the coast of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Seafaring by the Nabataeans is virtually an archaeological unknown: Indeed, in the corpus of Nabataean studies the issue is not often addressed. The inhabitants of what is now northwestern Saudi Arabia and southern Jordan are mostly known for their rock-carved buildings and tombs, at least in popular venues. Ancient authors noted, however, that Nab...
Chapter
Full-text available
In 1993, the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA) began a 10 week survey in the waters of the Persian Gulf at Bahrain (Pedersen, 1993). The project examined various areas off the northern coast of Bahrain for evidence of shipwrecks and other underwater sites using the traditional archaeological diving methodologies of search and survey. As part...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The archaeology of ships in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean lags behind other areas of the world. Relatively few shipwrecks there have been archaeologically investigated, and only one Red Sea wreck from the era before Islam has been excavated. This paper discusses the author’s shipwreck excavation at Black Assarca Island, Eritrea, as well as recent su...
Article
Full-text available
During the first decade of this century archaeology in a revitalized Lebanon has made new inroads into our understanding of the past. Archaeological investigations on land and under the sea at the middle Bronze Age Tell el Burak and at the early Bronze Age Tell Fadous-Kfarabida have yielded insights into late prehistoric and early historic settleme...
Article
Full-text available
In the 1970s, off the west coast of Sicily, a wreck was discovered, the past of which is brought together with the battle at Egadi Islands. The preserved rear section of the ship was provided with Punic characters that suggest the origin of the vessel. The Punic wreck was excavated in several campaigns. Honor Frost, the director of this project pre...
Article
Full-text available
In 2004 an underwater archaeological survey was conducted at Tell el-Burak, a Middle Bronze Age site ten kilometers south of Sidon. The objectives of the survey were to ascertain the existence of an associated harborage; to discern reasons for the placement of the settlement as it relates to the maritime environment; and to examine the evidence of...
Article
Full-text available
In May 2003 the author observed a clench-fastened boat near Chertala, Kerala, India. The boat appears to indicate a vessel-type previously undocumented in the area. This article reports the observations made of the vessel and its pertinence to the boat-construction traditions of Kerala and the subcontinent.© 2009 The Author
Article
Full-text available
Lying astride the Massawa Channel, between the mainland of Eritrea and the Dahlak archipelago, the two islands known as the Assarcas became the focus of archaeological investigation beginning in 1995 (Fig. 1). Both are ancient coral outcrops, with just enough accumulated topsoil to support euphorbia cacti, scrub grass, and the associated insects an...
Article
Full-text available
An examination of the section of Tablet XI of the Standard Version of the Epic of Gilgamesh concerning the description of the large boat built to preserve life from the destruction of the Flood.
Article
Full-text available
A description and examination of a 1000 year-old boat in Kerala, India. The vessel illuminates a little-known period in boat-building techniques, which include on this vessel the use of iron nails, transverse lashing, and dove-tail joinery. This vessel also includes the use of bulkheads (non-water tight), a double layer of planking with a layer of...
Article
Full-text available
A report on the excavation of the mid-first millennium shipwreck at Black Assarca Island, Eritrea. The shipwreck contained numerous examples of Aqaba amphoras, among other ceramics, glass, and a counter-balance weight seemingly of Byzantine origin.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (5)
Archived project
The project goal was to locate and study shipwrecks of antiquity and Islamic period.
Archived project
A survey of various locations around Bahrain to find sites of archaeological importance.
Project
The project is an multi-year endeavor to locate archaeological sites in the sea off Lebanon for study and the enrichment of Lebanese cultural heritage.