Rajendra Mohan Panda

Rajendra Mohan Panda
University of South Florida | USF · Department of Integrative Biology

Doctor of Philosophy
Spatial Analyses and Modeling; Machine & Deep Learning; Bayesian Statistics;

About

41
Publications
7,943
Reads
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232
Citations
Citations since 2017
34 Research Items
232 Citations
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Introduction
Rajendra has more than a decade-old experience in ecosystem ecology, community ecology, mountain ecology, invasion biology, forestry, remote sensing, soil science and wildlife with experience in large-data analytics, gradient pattern analyses, species distribution modelling, climate change predictions, spatial analyses and modelling, ecological monitoring, machine learning, Bayesian statistics, and development of R - Shinny Apps. His technical skills: R, ArcGIS, STAN, MATLAB, Python (basics).
Additional affiliations
August 2021 - July 2023
Mississippi State University
Position
  • Postdoctoral Associate
Description
  • Data mining and analyses; Machine learning; Bayesian Statistics; Mentoring; Collaboration; Project Management;
April 2020 - July 2021
University of Georgia
Position
  • Postdoctoral Associate
Description
  • Estimation of soil moisture and temperature; Interactive mapping and visualization; Development of R-Shiny Apps;
March 2019 - March 2020
Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Ecological Modeling; Climate Change Predictions; Invasion Risk Assessment; Mentoring; Lab Management; Teaching;
Education
January 2014 - December 2018
Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur
Field of study
  • Environmental Science

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Several factors describe the broad pattern of diversity in plant species distribution. We explore these determinants of species richness in Western Himalayas using high-resolution species data available for the area to energy, water, physiography and anthropogenic disturbance. The floral data involves 1279 species from 1178 spatial locations and 73...
Article
Full-text available
Although the longitudinal pattern of biological diversity may not be as striking as the latitudinal pattern, there are climatic gradients associated with habitat, topography and disturbance, which may generate variation in biological diversity along a longitudinal extent. We analysed the pattern of plant diversity using field data gathered from a n...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change enhances invasive species distribution by altering species composition in native ecosystems. Here we assessed harmony in plant invasions of two perennial exotic species of similar origin and naturalised in India, i.e., Chromolaena odorata and Tridax procumbens. Predictions made for the current condition was subsequently projected for...
Article
Full-text available
Many places of the earth support high plant species richness, but emphasis is given to biodiversity hotspots with rich endemic species under threats of destruction by anthropogenic interventions. This definitely underplays species conservation at several places significant for optimisation of preserving natural ecosystems. Here we explore influence...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change poses significant challenges to distribution of plant species. Rhododendron arboreum is considered as a keystone species between subalpine and the alpine regions. In the present study, we predict its future distribution in the Indian part of Western Himalaya by employing two species distribution modelling techniques. We used five lea...
Chapter
Each community has at least some degree of ecological diversity operating at various spatial and temporal scales. Mountains have high degree of physiographic complexities and a wide spectrum of environmental heterogeneity offering a multitude of climatic gradients for a high species diversity. In mountains, both soil and atmospheric temperature dif...
Chapter
The Indian parts of the Eastern Himalayas extend over 5,24,190 km2 and have >52% contribution to the whole Eastern Himalayas. The vegetation is broadly dominated by evergreen broadleaved forests with a dense canopy cover. Its complex physiography supports the rich diversity of about 5800 species in India with trees and shrubs accounting for >55% of...
Chapter
Rampant deforestation, industrialization, modernization, population explosion, and overexploitation of natural resources have increased the intensity of climate change. Global climate change is evidenced by a continuous rise in temperature, which in the last century, rose to 0.6°C. Nevertheless, this temperature rise is also evidenced in the Himala...
Chapter
The Western Himalayas is geomorphologically complex with an altitudinal extent of >8000 m and is dominated by herbs accounting for >63% of its species pool. Shrubs and trees represent >30% of the species pool (Panda (2018) Environmental determinants of plant richness in Indian Himalaya. Ph.D. Thesis, submitted to Indian Institute of Technology Khar...
Chapter
Data, data collection, selection, and methodology play key roles in ecological analysis. Data collected by appropriate methodology, and with the proper organization are essential for good interpretation. Based on the scientific problem to answer, data collection procedures are designed for sampling. And an appropriate sampling method solves major p...
Article
Full-text available
Upland cotton encounters biotic and abiotic stresses during the growing season, which significantly affects the genetic potential of stress tolerance and productivity. The root-knot nematode (RKN) (Meloidogyne incognita) is a soilborne roundworm affecting cotton production. The occurrence of abiotic stress (drought stress, DS) can alter the plant–d...
Article
Full-text available
Automated long-term mapping and climate niche modeling are important for developing adaptation and management strategies for rubber plantations (RP). Landsat imageries at the defoliation and refoliation stages were employed for RP mapping in the Indian state of Tripura. A decision tree classifier was applied to Landsat image-derived vegetation indi...
Chapter
Data acquisition is a process to collect and store information for production use. Data types maybe freshly collected data, legacy data, shared data, and purchased data. These data include sensor-generated data, empirical data, and other sources. This data acquisition concept started around the early 1970s, with the development of software by Inter...
Book
This book discusses plant invasions and environmental impacts on the Himalayas through a novel procedure, and helps to understand the influences of climate, physiography, soil, and disturbance on plant richness in mountain systems. Assessing invasion risks to mountain space under future climate change scenarios is highly significant for appropriate...
Poster
Soil moisture is an important component of the water cycle that controls many biophysical processes at the Earth’s surface. Efforts to model the soil water reservoir over large spatial extents have typically focused on the application of remote sensing or process-based hydrology models that integrate soil�landscape properties and climate variabl...
Article
Full-text available
Plant-disperser relationship is a mutual approach that regulates the species composition and habitat diversity. Here, we unfold the dispersal profile of India and provide comprehensive information on plant-disperser relationships, emphasising on plant longevities (annual, biennial, and perennial), plant life forms (tree, shrub, herb, liana), and ve...
Article
Full-text available
In spite of many theoretical explanations, the plant richness pattern along the mountain elevation gradient is still debatable. Here we considered East district of Sikkim state in the Eastern Himalaya to study plant richness pattern of vascular plants along an elevation gradient of 500–3300 m at 100, 200 and 300 m elevation steps. The study evaluat...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the patterns of biodiversity is central to species conservation planning. Here we illustrate chiropteran diversity and distribution pattern of the hill ranges of the Eastern Ghats of Odisha state, India using roost survey and mist net survey techniques. The present study recorded 23 bat species including two newly recorded species for...
Chapter
Full-text available
Study reports the socio-religious connections between blackbucks and local inhabitants is the most plaucible reason for conservation of this species in Ballipadar - Bhetnai Wildlife Reserve, Odisha, India
Cover Page
Full-text available
Newsletter of the Nature and Wildlife Conservation Society of Odisha
Research
Full-text available
News article in Saptahika Samaj on 22 Jan, 1997 (In Odia)
Article
Full-text available
With the availability of satellite data from free data domain, remote sensing has increasingly become a fast-hand tool for monitoring of land and water resources development activities with minimal cost and time. Here, we verified construction of check dams and implementation of plantation activities in two districts of Tripura state using Landsat...
Article
Understanding the impact of climate change on species invasion is crucial for sustainable biodiversity conservation. Through this study, we try to answer how species differing in phenological cycles, specifically Cassia tora and Lantana camara, differ in the manner in which they invade new regions in India in the future climate. Since both species...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Species richness pattern is poorly understood at local scales. Here we analyse impacts of physiography, climate, and edaphic factors on species richness pattern of the Eastern Himalaya using 376 spatial location points, collected through scientifically designed national level sampling assessment. We fitted nonlinear predictive model technique for 1...
Chapter
Full-text available
20 parasites identified in blackbucks of Odisha state include three sucking lice (Anoplura), two louse flea (Diptera), two from Mallophaga, two fleas (Siphonapterans), 11 ticks and mites (Arachnids)
Chapter
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
The food prefences of Antilope cervicapra to ragi, paddy and moong justifies their pest status. Changing crop pattern by nonpreferred crops like pulses and til could serve as most effective pest management program to reduce human-blackbuck conflict.

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