Rahel Rabi

Rahel Rabi
Baycrest · Rotman Research Institute

Doctor of Philosophy

About

16
Publications
3,699
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223
Citations

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
Time of day (TOD) influences on executive functions have been widely reported, with greater efficiency demonstrated at optimal relative to non-optimal TOD according to one’s chronotype (i.e., synchrony effect). Older adults (OAs) show declines in inhibitory control and are more sensitive to the effects of circadian variation on executive functionin...
Article
Aging is associated with altered brain connectivity within the default mode network (DMN). Although research using functional magnetic resonance imaging has quantified age-related alterations in functional connectivity within this network during resting state, it is less clear how this may be reflected in electrophysiological measures, and how this...
Article
In humans, age-related declines in vision, hearing, and touch coincide with changes in amplitude and latency of sensory-evoked potentials. These age-related differences in neural activity may be related to a common deterioration of supra-modal brain areas (e.g., PFC) that mediate activity in sensory cortices or reflect specific sensorineural impair...
Article
Objectives Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a prodromal stage of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, is characterized by episodic memory impairment. Recent evidence has shown inhibitory control deficits in aMCI, but the extent of these deficits across inhibitory domains (i.e., response inhibition and interference control) and aMCI su...
Article
Full-text available
Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is a prodromal stage of Alzheimer’s disease that is characterized by impairments in episodic memory. Recent evidence has shown that inhibitory control is also impaired in aMCI. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to quantify inhibitory control ability in individuals with aMCI by examining performance a...
Article
Full-text available
When learning rule-based categories, sufficient cognitive resources are needed to test hypotheses, maintain the currently active rule in working memory, update rules after feedback, and to select a new rule if necessary. Prior research has demonstrated that conjunctive rules are more complex than unidimensional rules and place greater demands on ex...
Article
Being able to categorize promotes cognitive economy by reducing the amount of information that an individual needs to remember. This ability is particularly important in older adulthood, when executive functioning abilities are known to decline. Prior research has shown that older adults can learn simple categories quite well but struggle when lear...
Preprint
Being able to categorize promotes cognitive economy by reducing the amount of information that an individual needs to remember. This ability is particularly important in older adulthood, when executive functioning abilities are known to decline. Prior research has shown that older adults can learn simple categories quite well but struggle when lear...
Preprint
PreprintWhen learning rule-based categories, sufficient cognitive resources are needed to test hypotheses, maintain the currently active rule in working memory, update rules after feedback, and to select a new rule if necessary. Prior research has demonstrated that conjunctive rules are more complex than unidimensional rules and place greater deman...
Article
Shepard, Hovland, and Jenkins (1961) examined the categorization abilities of younger adults using tasks involving single-dimensional rule learning, disjunctive rule learning, and family resemblance learning. The current study examined category learning in older adults using this well-known category set. Older adults, like younger adults, found cat...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable research on category learning has suggested that many cognitive and environmental factors can have a differential effect on the learning of rule-defined (RD) categories as opposed to the learning of non-rule-defined (NRD) categories. Prior research has also suggested that ego depletion can temporarily reduce the capacity for executive...
Article
Two experiments explored the different strategies used by children and adults when learning new perceptual categories. Participants were asked to learn a set of categories for which both a single-feature rule and overall similarity would allow for perfect performance. Other rules allowed for suboptimal performance. Transfer stimuli (Experiments 1 a...
Conference Paper
Studies of category learning have supported the idea that people rely on at least two cognitive systems when learning new categories. A verbally-mediated system is best suited for learning rule-based categories, and a nonverbal, procedural system is best suited for learning categories that are not de-fined by a rule. To further examine the cognitiv...
Article
Full-text available
Rule-based category learning was examined in 4-11 year-olds and adults. Participants were asked to learn a set of novel perceptual categories in a classification learning task. Categorization performance improved with age, with younger children showing the strongest rule-based deficit relative to older children and adults. Model-based analyses prov...
Article
Full-text available
Theories of mood and its effect on cognitive processing suggest that positive mood may allow for increased cognitive flexibility. This increased flexibility is associated with the prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex, both of which play crucial roles in hypothesis testing and rule selection. Thus, cognitive tasks that rely on behavio...

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