Rafael Rueda-Hernández

Rafael Rueda-Hernández
University of California, Los Angeles | UCLA · Institute of the Environmental

PhD
Bird Genoscape Project - Mexico

About

29
Publications
5,852
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184
Citations
Introduction
I'm interested in everything that involves birds, from molt (as a process and pattern) to conservation genomics.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - August 2018
Institute of Ecology INECOL
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2015 - February 2016
Universidad Veracruzana
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Biogeography
February 2015 - August 2015
Universidad Veracruzana
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Statistics
Education
August 2011 - February 2015
August 2005 - July 2007
Universidad Veracruzana
Field of study
  • Neuroetología
August 2000 - July 2004
Universidad Veracruzana
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Migratory birds face population declines attributed to habitat loss and modification in the wintering grounds, which may influence body condition, time of arrival to breeding grounds, and future reproductive opportunities. Despite this, very little is known of wintering ecology of migratory birds. During three winter seasons, we assessed Wilson's W...
Article
Full-text available
Avian communities in cloud forests have high levels of endemism and are at major risk given the accelerated rate of habitat fragmentation. Nevertheless, the response of these communities to changes in fragment size remains poorly understood. We evaluated species richness, bird community density, community composition, and dominance as indicators of...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT.—We describe the number of inserted molts in the annual molt cycle and topographies resulting from the preformative molt in 10 Neotropical forest passerine species. Seven species showed two annual molt peaks, one in early spring (March – April) and one in late summer (July – September). The spring molt consisted of a light replacement of b...
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative descriptions of wing‐feather replacement during the preformative and prealternate molts of resident Neotropical passerines are deficient: no more than 100 species possess adequate information. Here, we pres‐ ent quantitative molt data for 23 Neotropical passerines in three blocks: wing and tail molt extent, frequency of wing‐ molt patt...
Article
The influence of climate extremes on tree phenology or cavity resources, and the consequences for threatened species, are poorly understood. We determined flowering and fruiting phenology, and availability of tree-cavities and snags in deciduous and semi-deciduous tropical dry forest from 2009 to 2016, prior-to and following landfall by hurricanes...
Article
Full-text available
β-diversity has been under continuous debate, with a current need to better understand the way in which a new wave of measures work. We assessed the results of 12 incidence-based β-diversity indices. Our results of gradual species composition overlap between paired assemblages considering progressive differences in species richness show that: (i) f...
Article
Scavenger birds are common species frequently associated with open habitats, but sympatric vulture species have differing natural history traits that may influence seasonal habitat relationships and responses to natural disturbances, such as hurricanes. We evaluated seasonality and habitat relationships of Black Vultures (Coragyps atratus) and Turk...
Article
Full-text available
Neotropical Cardinalidae consist of 40 species in 10 genera that have diversified across the Americas. We provide quantitative information on the preformative molt of 21 Cardinalidae species of seven genera, plus one Thraupidae species placed within Cardinalidae until recently. From 155 preformative molt cards, we calculated molt extent estimates,...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization has been recognized as one of the most widespread threats to biodiversity. However, the response of wildlife to urbanization differs among groups, with many species being able to persist, adapt, and even thrive in these novel ecosystems. With the aim of assessing the response of avian communities in a neotropical green city, we evaluat...
Article
Full-text available
1) Moulting strategies in birds have evolved to avoid overlap with, or prepare for, other demanding parts of the annual cycle, such as reproduction or migration. When moulting for the first time after leaving the nest, young birds replace their typically poor-quality plumage during the post-juvenile moult. The extent of this moult varies between sp...
Article
We explored adaptive factors affecting the preformative molt in the passerine family Cardinalidae, and concluded that the ancestor inhabited forest habitats and underwent a partial preformative molt that included wing coverts but not primaries. Later radiations within the family appeared to be characterized by transitions from forests toward more o...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this concluding chapter, we underline the main conclusions of the reviewed topics regarding avian ecology in urban Latin America, namely: an updated literature review (Chap. 2); species richness and composition (Chap. 3); demography and population dynamics (Chap. 4); relationships with urban infrastructure (Chap. 5); behavior (Chap. 6); urban th...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization poses important environmental, social, and ecological pressures, representing a major threat to biodiversity. However, urban areas are highly heterogeneous, with some greenspaces (e.g., urban forests, parks, private gardens) providing resources and a refuge for wildlife communities. In this study we surveyed 10 taxonomic groups to asse...
Conference Paper
In tropical forests, natural cavities are the major nesting substrate for secondary cavity-nesters. Contrastingly, in temperate forests, excavated cavities are the preferred nesting substrate for cavity adopters, and standing dead trees the selected substrate for cavity excavators. However, in tropical montane forests, cavity nesters remain poorly...
Conference Paper
Avian communities in cloud forests maintain high levels of endemism, but are at major risk given the accelerated loss of land cover resulting in habitat fragmentation. Nevertheless, the response of these avian communities to changes in fragment size remains poorly known. We assessed changes in four aspects of avian communities: species richness, bi...
Article
Full-text available
We report the first documented record of the Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) in the Chamela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve in Jalisco, Mexico. We show photographs of a bird captured in an old-growth semi-deciduous forest fragment (19º25.139'N 104º58.567'W; altitude 40 m). The winter distribution of this species is restricted to eastern...
Article
During partial moults birds replace a variable number or percentage of old feathers. This quantity, known as moult extent, has been a primary variable used in comparative studies. However, different spatial configurations of feather replacement may result from an equal number of renewed feathers. Few studies have addressed spatial aspects of moult,...
Article
Full-text available
Documentamos el primer registro del chipe flanco castaño (Setophaga pensylvanica) en la Reserva de la Biosfera Chamela-Cuixmala en Jalisco, México. Presentamos fotografías de un individuo capturado en un fragmento de selva mediana (19º25.139’N 104º58.567’O; 40 m snm). La distribución de invierno de esta especie se restringe al este de México, con p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Habitat loss in the Neotropics is a threat for many bird species, particularly for bird species with specific nesting requirements, such as cavity nesters. Cloud forests in Mexico host a rich community of cavity nesting birds, which may be threatened by increasing deforestation rates. We assessed cavity availability and characteristics in three for...
Article
Full-text available
Registramos de manera casual, en repetidas ocasiones, un individuo de búho cornudo (Bubo virginianus) en un fragmento de bosque perturbado adyacente a un canal de drenaje a cielo abierto dentro de la ciudad de Xalapa, Veracruz (19°31’10.401”N, 96°54’42.297”O; 1342 m snm). A pesar de que se trata de una especie común presente en casi todo México, a...
Article
Full-text available
The spot-breasted Wren and the White-breasted Wood-Wren undergo a partial perforative molt resulting in molt limits each between juvenal and formative feathers within and between the lesser, median and greater coverts, alula, and tortillas. These two wrens do not replace secondaries or primaries, and only some White-breasted Wood-Wrens molt rectric...
Technical Report
Full-text available
se fundamenta y motiva con respecto a la posible afectación a las ANPs de la región, incluidas la Reserva de la Biosfera Chamela-Cuixmala, la reserva MaB UNESCO y el sitio Ramsar,

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Describe molt, in Neotropical passerine species study ecological and evolutionary patterns
Project
Molt is a crucial process of avian life history. It is linked to individual behavior and population dynamics, and correlates with multiple environmental and social factors. Molt patterns also are extensively used for ageing birds. Unfortunately, most Neotropical species still lack information regarding the basic aspects of their molt strategies (e.g. phenology, extent, number of episodes per cycle, location, and sequence), thus impairing our ability to carry out broader ecological and evolutionary studies. We would like to call attention to this important shortcoming and encourage researchers to communicate their experience and knowledge on the subject.