Radek Šimík

Radek Šimík
Charles University in Prague | CUNI · Institute of Czech Language and Theory of Communication

PhD

About

53
Publications
8,817
Reads
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168
Citations
Introduction
I'm interested in the interface of (morpho)syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - present
Charles University in Prague
Position
  • Principal Investigator
Description
  • Research on relative clauses and on how they are derived from interrogatives.
January 2016 - June 2019
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Position
  • Principal Investigator
Description
  • Research on definiteness in articleless languages.
September 2010 - December 2015
Universität Potsdam
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Research on information structure
Education
September 2006 - August 2010
University of Groningen
Field of study
  • General Linguistics
September 2000 - August 2006
Palacký University Olomouc
Field of study
  • Czech Philology and English Philology

Publications

Publications (53)
Preprint
Comprehenders have been found to activate, select, and represent plausible alternatives to focused elements when processing incoming sentences (see Gotzner & Spalek, 2019 for an overview). This is consistent with Rooth’s (1992) theory of focus interpretation, which claims that the function of focus is to create an additional level of meaning consis...
Preprint
Full-text available
We discuss wh-based unconditionals in Arabic ('wherever she went, she was followed by photographers'), with special attention paid to the so-called doubling unconditionals in whose antecedents the predicate/clause is reduplicated (lit. 'wher(ever) she went she went, she was followed by photographers'). We propose that the doubling unconditionals ca...
Preprint
Full-text available
The paper provides experimental evidence (naturalness rating paradigm) that wh-extraction from clausal adjuncts (conditionals, temporal clauses, purpose clauses) is grammatical in Czech, although it is fully natural only in one specific condition: if the adjunct is left-peripheral (vs. right-peripheral/central), if the adjunct is not headed by nomi...
Preprint
Full-text available
This short article discusses Czech copular sentences like To je učitelka 'That is a teacher'. It puts forth a number of arguments that-counter to the common assumption-the demonstrative (to 'that') is the predicate and the nominal (učitelka 'teacher') is the subject. The arguments are based on morphosyntactic and semantic evidence. Tento krátký čl...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this article we describe syntactic and semantic properties of Czech binominal každý 'each'. We focus on the interaction between binominal každý with different types of collectives. We explain a surprising compatibility of certain types of collec-tives with binominal každý by a local conception of distributivity and collectivity. The semantic for...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper provides an analysis of Czech bare vs. demonstrative NPs and in particular of their referential uses involving situational uniqueness. Contrary to the traditional view that bare NPs correlate with uniqueness and demonstrative NPs with anaphoricity, I argue that the relevant classification involves two types of uniqueness: inherent unique...
Article
Full-text available
::: Published in Naše řeč 104(4), 207-224 ::: The paper focuses on relative clauses introduced by jak 'how' in spoken Czech, relying on corpus data. It argues that these clauses, in contrast to relative clauses introduced by co 'what', are functionally specialized, in that they are based on propositions that form a part of the shared know ledge of...
Chapter
Full-text available
According to a prominent hypothesis, word order manipulations in Slavic languages without articles can correspond to the use of definite or indefinite articles in languages that have them. We test this hypothesis using a production design in which participants build sentential picture descriptions from provided constituents. The crucial question is...
Chapter
Full-text available
This is a survey article about the semantics of free relatives. Issues discussed include the basic denotation of free relatives (detailed comparison between the definite, universal, and indefinite positions), semantics of ever free relatives (expressing ignorance, indifference, or non-modal kinds of variation), and the issue of how free relatives g...
Chapter
This chapter gives a detailed survey of the semantics of free relatives. After providing a brief characterization and typology of free relatives, the chapter reviews the arguments that have played a role in the debate about the semantic nature of free relatives. The arguments clearly support the traditional view that free relatives correspond to de...
Article
Full-text available
We present a number of experiments testing influential hypotheses about the meaning of definite descriptions (in languages with articles, represented here by German) and bare nominals (in articleless languages, represented here by Russian). Our results are in line with the commonly entertained hypothesis that definite descriptions convey uniqueness...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We provide corpus evidence (i) that the effect of clausal position of bare NPs on their (in)definiteness is real and (ii) that what matters is absolute position (clause-initial vs. clause-final) rather than relative position to the verb (preverbal vs. postverbal). The strongest effect found is a restriction on clause-initial indefinite bare NPs (in...
Preprint
Full-text available
We provide corpus evidence (i) that the effect of clausal position of bare NPs on their (in)definiteness is real and (ii) that what matters is absolute position (clause-initial vs. clause-final) rather than relative position to the verb (preverbal vs. postverbal). The strongest effect found is a restriction on clause-initial indefinite bare NPs (in...
Preprint
Full-text available
According to a prominent hypothesis word order manipulations in Slavic languages without articles can correspond to the use of definite or indefinite articles in languages that have them. We test this hypothesis using a production design in which participants build sentential picture descriptions from provided constituents. The crucial question is...
Article
Full-text available
Doubling unconditionals are exemplified by the Spanish example Venga quien venga, estaré contento ‘Whoever comes, I’ll be happy’ (lit. ‘Comes who comes, I’ll be happy’). This curious and little studied construction is attested in various forms in a number of Romance and Slavic languages. In this paper, I provide a basic description of these constru...
Book
Gisbert Fanselow’s work has been invaluable and inspiring to many ­researchers working on syntax, morphology, and information ­structure, both from a ­theoretical and from an experimental perspective. This ­volume comprises a collection of articles dedicated to Gisbert on the occasion of his 60th birthday, covering a range of topics from these area...
Article
Full-text available
Preprint
Full-text available
The paper provides an analysis of Czech bare vs. demonstrative NPs and in particular of their referential uses involving situational uniqueness. Contrary to the traditional view that bare NPs correlate with uniqueness and demonstrative NPs with anaphoricity, I argue that the relevant classification involves two types of uniqueness: inherent uniquen...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We discuss the little known fact that left-adjoined conditionals like [If you invite John], the party will be fun are transparent for A'-extraction in Czech, yielding structures like This is the man who_1 [if you invite t_1], the party will be fun. String-identical but syntactically integrated conditionals The party will be fun [if you invite John]...
Preprint
Full-text available
Doubling unconditionals are exemplified by the Spanish example Venga quien venga, estaré contento 'Whoever comes, I'll be happy.' (lit. 'Comes who comes, I'll be happy'). This curious and little studied construction is attested in various forms in a number of Romance and Slavic languages. In this paper, I provide a basic description of these constr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Based on a sample of seven languages, I show that the so called modal inferences in ever free relatives (ignorance and indifference) are not universally available. The primary reading of eFRs crosslinguistically turns out to be a "non-modal" one, which is available to all languages under investigation. The implication is that if there is a modal in...
Article
Based on a sample of seven languages, I show that the so-called modal inferencesin ever free relatives (ignorance and indifference) are not universally available. The primaryreading of ever free relatives crosslinguistically turns out to be a “non-modal” one, which isavailable to all languages under investigation. The implication is that if there i...
Article
The DOI will bring you to open-access supplementary materials to our paper - experimental items and recordings, results, plots (also in color).
Article
Full-text available
The received wisdom is that word order alternations in Slavic languages arise as a direct consequence of word order-related information structure constraints such as 'place given expressions before new ones'. In this paper, we compare the word order hypothesis with a competing one, according to which word order alternations arise as a consequence o...
Chapter
This is an annotated bibliography on modal existential wh-constructions, existential free relatives, and a number of related (non-headed) wh-constructions which are or have been argued to be interpreted existentially.
Article
We provide an analysis of focus and exhaustive focus in the Grassfields Bantu language Awing. We show that Awing provides an exceptionally clear window into the syntactic properties of exhaustive focus. Our analysis reveals that the Awing particle LE realizes a left-peripheral head which, in terms of its syntactic position in the functional sequenc...
Research
Full-text available
A research article (manuscript)
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper offers a novel syntactico-semantic treatment of canonical and pragmatic demonstratives (the latter type being exemplified by so called affective demonstratives) and within that frame provides an analysis of pragmatic anaphora in Czech. Pragmatic anaphora is understood as an anaphoric relation between the denotation of a demonstrative des...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper offers a semantic analysis of Czech free relatives and pays particular attention to so called ever free relatives, i.e. free relatives whose wh-word is modified by the ever morpheme (the postfix-koli(v) in Czech). I argue that Czech free relatives should be uniformly analyzed as definite descriptions , denoting the maximal (plural) entit...
Article
Full-text available
We present evidence from acceptability judgment experiments that there is systematic prosodic givenness marking in Czech in that discourse-salient elements avoid sentence stress, contra the claim in Kučerová (2007, 2012) that givenness is marked only syntactically---by establishing a word order in which all given elements precede all new ones---and...
Article
Full-text available
Lydia Grebenyova’s book is an updated and extended version of her University of Maryland dissertation (Grebenyova 2006). Chapters 1, 2, 3, and 5 correspond to chapters 2–5 of her dissertation, respectively, without major discernable updates. Chapters 4 and 6 are new and present further studies closely related to the topic. Chapter 7 is also new but...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We study the impact of givenness on the position of direct object with respect to three other clause-mate constituents: subject, verb, and a VP-modifying PP. Based on two controlled acceptability judgment experiments, we establish two main observations: (i) objects in all-new clauses are significantly less acceptable in a preverbal position than in...
Article
Recent discussion of obligatory control in the literature mostly concentrates on the issue of which syntactic module (movement, agreement, etc.) is responsible for the establishment of the control relation. This paper looks at the issue of control from a higher order perspective. Abandoning the presupposition that control constituents denote propos...
Article
Full-text available
The article reports on a cross-linguistic synchronic and diachronic corpus study on indefinites. The study covered five indefinite expressions, each in a different language. The main goal of the study was to verify the distribution of these indefinites synchronically and to attest their historical development. The methodology we used is a form of f...
Chapter
Full-text available
In Czech, several verbs can embed infinitives in which the object, not the subject, appears to function as the controlled argument. Following Jespersen (1940) we call these infinitives retroactive infinitives and analyze them as hidden passives, in which an object base-generated in the embedded structure enters into an A-relation (phi-agreement, Ca...
Chapter
Full-text available
A squib arguing against the D+CP analysis of free relatives and in favor of a bare CP analysis. The definiteness/maximality is derived by a type-shifting rule applied at the interface. This derives the observation that free relatives are definite if they are finite and indefinite if they are non-finite.
Chapter
Full-text available
Hagstrom's (1998) semantics of (multiple) interrogatives is made information structure sensitive. The placement of the Q-particle, the main determinant of different kinds of multiple question readings in Hagstrom's account, is argued to be focus-sensitive. I show how three types of readings can be derived: standard pair list readings, "reciprocal"...
Article
Full-text available
The article discusses the methodology adopted for a cross-linguistic synchronic and diachronic corpus study on indefinites. The study covered five indefinite expressions, each in a different language. The main goal of the study was to verify the distribution of these indefinites synchronically and to attest their historical development. The methodo...
Chapter
Full-text available
A paper about cleft-like focus constructions and wh-questions in Czech. The prominent role is played by the invariable demonstrative to, which is shown to be a morphological and semantic cousin of the definite article in the verbal/propositional domain.
Chapter
Full-text available
I argue that wh-words in Slavic modal existential wh-constructions ('I have with who to speak') lack standard operator properties (e.g. successive cyclic movement) and that they should be treated on a par with indefinite pronouns ('something'). Then I provide an analysis in terms of Hamblin semantics. I argue that the "matrix" verb ('have') is a mo...
Article
Czech indefinite pronouns like někdo ‘someone’ (unlike indefinite nouns like peníze ‘money’) cannot be pronounced in their base (postverbal) position unless they are interpreted as narrowly focused. Broad focus (focus on the whole verb phrase) is only facilitated with indefinite pronouns in a derived (preverbal) position. The analysis in this paper...
Article
Full-text available
This paper has a general and a specic goal. Firstly, it aims to contribute to the discussion of natural language quantication, especially in its syntactic aspect. We argue that the com- ponents of generalized quantiers (GQ) can be base-generated separately and form a unit in the course of the syntactic derivation. In particular, the GQ restricto...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I know that there've been similar discussions on RG, but I haven't seen this particular question tackled yet. Suppose you receive a manuscript, where the names of the authors are explicitly provided or otherwise clear. You face the dilemma: either you review it blindly (single-blind) or reveal your identity. What would you go for and why? I tend to follow the fairness principle: either double-blind (most preferably) or revealed identity on either side. Any other ideas? Any arguments for preferring a single-blind review?

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Projects

Projects (5)
Archived project
1,568 articles in the online edition explain more than 7,000 linguistic terms connected with description of Czech embedded in the broader context of Slavonic and general linguistics: https://www.czechency.org/index.html
Project
This project investigates the relation between wh-based relative clauses, such as the bracketed part of "John ate [what Mary cooked]" or "John ate the meal [which Mary cooked]", and the corresponding interrogatives, such as in "John asked [what Mary cooked] / [which meal Mary cooked]". Building on observations from various domains of grammar, all pointing to the fact that relative pronouns/clauses are derived from interrogative pronouns/clauses, and not conversely, the project asks the question why that is so - why interrogatives are basic and relatives derived - and attempts to formulate a theory of wh-pronouns and wh-clauses that would explain this asymmetry.
Project
This is an ongoing hobby of mine, which I pursued mostly during my PhD studies, but I occasionally get back to it. The core of my research on wh-constructions lies in the study of modal existential wh-constructions, on which I wrote my PhD thesis, but I've also been interested in wh-questions and (free) relative clauses. My underlying hypothesis is that many syntactic properties of wh-constructions (such as wh-movement or the syntactic size of the wh-clause) follow from their independent semantic properties.