Rachel Johnson

Rachel Johnson
University of Georgia | UGA · Department of Kinesiology

MS in Athletic Training

About

19
Publications
874
Reads
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22
Citations
Introduction
Rachel Johnson is currently a fourth year doctoral student at the University of Georgia, and works as a doctoral research assistant within the UGA Concussion Research Laboratory. Rachel focuses on concussion research, with an interest in motor control, biomechanics, postural control, and functional movement following concussion. Her most recent publication is ‘A Proposal for Complex Gait Evaluation Using Dual-Task Gait Termination Time'.
Research Experience
August 2017 - present
University of Georgia
Position
  • Graduate Research Assistant
August 2016 - June 2017
A.T. Still University of Health Sciences
Position
  • Graduate Research Assistant
Education
August 2017 - May 2022
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Kinesiology
July 2015 - May 2017
A.T. Still University of Health Sciences
Field of study
  • Post-Professional Athletic Training
September 2011 - May 2015
Springfield College
Field of study
  • Athletic Training

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Objective: School counselors are important members of the concussion management team. However, little is known about their perceptions of academic adjustments for concussed studentathletes. Methods: Participants were solicited to complete the Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussion – School Counselor (BAKPAC-SC) surve...
Article
Our purpose was to describe the youth flag football head impact burden and make comparisons with youth tackle football. Head impact frequency and magnitude (linear acceleration [g], rotational acceleration [rad/s2]) were collected from 25 tackle and 25 flag youth football players over one season. Athlete exposure (AE) was defined as one player part...
Article
Purpose: Examine the association between clinical and functional reaction time (RT) assessments with and without simultaneous cognitive tasks among healthy individuals. Methods: Participants (n=41, 49% female; 22.5±2.1yrs; 172.5±11.9cm; 71.0±13.7kg) completed clinical (drop stick, Stroop) and functional (gait, jump landing, single leg hop, antic...
Article
Context: Gait termination time (GTT) has been used to predict falls in older adults but has not been explored in the sport rehabilitation setting. The incorporation of a concurrent cognitive task as a complex measure of gait in this clinical population could lead to better health-related outcomes. Objective: To compare the effect of planned and...
Article
Context: Concussions are shown to hinder multiple health dimensions, including health-related quality of life (HRQOL), suggesting a need for a whole-person approach to assessment and treatment. Patient-reported outcome measures are one method to gather the patient's perspective regarding their HRQOL. Objective: To evaluate perceived HRQOL using...
Article
Context: Reaction time (RT) is fundamental to optimal sport performance and is commonly assessed post-concussion. Numerous studies indicate increased musculoskeletal injury risk following concussion that may be attributed to inhibited sport movement during simultaneous cognitive processing (i.e. dual-task) not directly measured on current clinical...
Article
Purpose To explore the relationship between reaction time (RT) on a commonly used post-concussion computerized neurocognitive assessment and dynamic RT during sport-like movements, with and without a cognitive task. Methods Fourteen healthy individuals (7 females; age=22.3±2.5yrs, height=169.1±14.0cm, mass=71.1±16.8kg) completed a computerized Str...
Article
Full-text available
Youth flag football has been proposed as a safe alternative to tackle football due to rising concerns of neurodegeneration from repetitive blows, but the true head impact (HI) burden in youth flag football is unknown. PURPOSE: To examine overall and age-specific HI exposure and magnitude in youth flag football. METHODS: Five youth flag football tea...
Article
Full-text available
Background There is growing fear among healthcare professionals and parents regarding youth tackle football, likely due to highly publicized concerns about potential long-term physical and cognitive health of professional football players. Parents and advocacy groups are pushing for state legislation to ban youth tackle football in favor of flag fo...
Poster
Full-text available
Tackle football faces scrutiny and concerns regarding long-term health consequences; however, limited evidence exists on head impact biomechanics in youth. The purpose of this study was to examine youth tackle football head impact exposure and magnitude differences between practices and games. Throughout the 2017 season, head impact (HI) sensors (T...
Poster
Full-text available
Context: There is growing concern among healthcare professionals and parents regarding youth tackle football, likely due to highly publicized concern about potential long-term physical and cognitive health of professional football players. Repetitive head impacts are believed to be associated with cognitive deficits later in life, although the rela...
Article
Following concussion, it is hypothesized that cognitive activity may potentially hinder patient recovery. This is based on the theory that cognitive activity alters the metabolism of the brain, which could potentially delay the healing process of a traumatic brain injury. While the recommendation of cognitive rest is often maintained and rationaliz...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The overall goal of this research line is to identify: 1) Consistency in reaction time (RT) deficits throughout concussion recovery. 2) Determine if RT deficits depend upon the assessment tool being used. 3) Identify if functional RT measures (e.g. gait, sport-specific movement, or simulated on-road driving) provide greater insight for clinicians than traditional clinical RT measures (e.g. computerized neurocognitive testing).