Rachel Warnock

Rachel Warnock
Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg | FAU · Department of Palaeobiology

About

5
Publications
446
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
51
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
51 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022051015
2016201720182019202020212022051015
2016201720182019202020212022051015
2016201720182019202020212022051015
Introduction
Rachel Warnock currently works at the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering (BSSE), ETH Zurich. Rachel does research in Paleobiology and Evolutionary Biology.

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
Full-text available
Today parasites comprise a huge proportion of living biodiversity and play a major role in shaping community structure. Given their ecological significance, parasite extinctions could result in massive cascading effects across ecosystems. It is therefore crucial that we have a way of estimating their extinction risk. Attempts to do this have often...
Preprint
Full-text available
The fossilized birth-death (FBD) process provides an ideal model for inferring phylogenies from both extant and fossil taxa. Using this approach, fossils (with or without character data) are directly considered as part of the tree. This leads to a statistically coherent prior on divergence times, where the variance associated with node ages reflect...
Article
Full-text available
Fossil information is essential for estimating species divergence times, and can be integrated into Bayesian phylogenetic inference using the fossilized birth-death (FBD) process. An important aspect of palaeontological data is the uncertainty surrounding specimen ages, which can be handled in different ways during inference. The most common approa...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
PARADIVE will refine state-of-the-art approaches to integrate past observations of parasitic interactions into models to predict changes in occurrence and prevalence of marine and terrestrial parasitism and their relationship with climate, disease, host diversity and parasite specialization during environmental crises.