Rachel Unkefer

Rachel Unkefer

About

4
Publications
12,670
Reads
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1
Citation
Citations since 2017
2 Research Items
1 Citation
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
20172018201920202021202220230.00.20.40.60.81.0
Introduction
Rachel Unkefer currently does research in Genetic Genealogy and Historical Anthropology. One current project is 'R-FGC20747 Subclade of R1b-DF27 Y Chromosome.'

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents new Y-DNA evidence to contradict the narrative that a cluster of Ashkenazi Jewish men belonging to the I-P37 haplogroup was of somewhat recent Cossack paternity (perhaps in the 17th century). NGS testing has shown that these men shared a common Jewish male ancestor around 1,000 years ago, prior to any historical mention of the C...
Article
Full-text available
Twenty years ago, a haplogroup estimate of R-M343 or R-M269 was assumed to be a marker of non-Jewish paternal ancestry. With new scienti c tools, we now know that, instead, it might indicate descendance from any number of known Jewish lineages, small and large, with probable ancient origins in the Middle East, western Asia, Africa, or the Mediterra...
Article
Full-text available
Most genealogists researching their Ashkenazi families encounter brick walls in the paper trail within the past 200 years. A new research strategy using Y-DNA Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) allows us to go back further in time and, in some cases, discover a history different from the expected one. Using results from FamilyTreeDNA’s “Big Y” test,...
Article
Full-text available
Way back when, starting out as genealogists researching Jewish ancestry, we probably all had the experience at least once of being chastened by a more seasoned researcher when we asked if our ancestor from, say, Poland could be related to his or her ancestor with the same surname from, say, the west bank of the Rhine. Surnames, we were told, came w...

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The preponderance of males living in the 21st century with the surname Bacharach/Bachrach or other variants appear to share a common male ancestor in the Middle Ages, regardless of their ancestors' European country of residence in the 17th or 18th centuries.