Rachel Kappler

Rachel Kappler
Holden Arboretum · Community Forestry and Conservation

Doctor of Philosophy

About

8
Publications
511
Reads
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32
Citations
Introduction
I use conservation biology; animal behavior; population dynamics and landscape ecology in my research. I'm interested in researching different species and ecosystems but have only worked in the Midwestern US. My methods often use field observations/experiments, mathematical models and GIS. I've been involved with ash tree research for the past ten years due to its decline from EAB.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - December 2018
Bowling Green State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
August 2014 - present
Bowling Green State University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Teaching Anatomy & Physiology Lab
November 2012 - August 2014
The Brown Mackie College
Position
  • Adjunct Instructor
Description
  • Instructor for Anatomy & Physiology, Microbiology, Environmental Science
Education
August 2014 - May 2018
Bowling Green State University
Field of study
  • Biology
August 2007 - August 2009
Bowling Green State University
Field of study
  • Biology
January 2004 - May 2006
Michigan State University
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
The invasive emerald ash borer beetle (Agrilus planipennis, EAB) has caused significant ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) mortality and cascading forest changes in the United States. We quantitatively estimated the viability of a local green ash tree (F. pennsylvanica) population to evaluate the magnitude of change caused by EAB. We developed historic and w...
Article
The invasive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB) has destroyed ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) populations across the US, but remnant populations including many small trees and, more rarely, larger trees remain after EAB had its first major impact across the landscape. The future survival of these remnant trees is critical to the viabil...
Article
Full-text available
Few ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) have survived the initial devastation that emerald ash borer beetle (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) has caused in natural populations. We studied green ash (Fraxinus planipennis) trees in a floodplain population after > 90% of ash had died from EAB infestation. We examined the relationship among the canopy health classes o...
Article
Wild blue lupine (Lupinus perennis) in the Oak Openings Region of Northwest Ohio is an important nitrogen fixer and serves as an essential food source for the federally endangered Karner Blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis). In order to examine potential factors that might be affecting mice predation on wild blue lupine seeds in oak savannas...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis), an introduced wood-boring insect, has killed millions of ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees in the Midwest region of the United States and Canada. However, in some areas where EAB has caused almost complete mortality of mature ash trees, a small number of healthy ash trees intermingled with the dead ash trees h...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The Oak Openings Region of Northwest Ohio is a mosaic of globally rare communities including oak savannas and woodlands. The perennial wild blue lupine (Lupinus perennis) in the Oak Openings Region is an important nitrogen fixer and serves as an essential food source for the larvae of federally endangered Karner Blue bu...
Thesis
Full-text available
Wild blue lupine (Lupinus perennis) in the Oak Openings Region of Northwest Ohio is an important nitrogen fixer and serves as an essential food source for the federally endangered Karner Blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis). We focused on potential factors that might be affecting mice predation on wild blue lupine seeds in oak savannas. Prev...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
In Ohio forested ash stands had almost complete mortality within 6 years (Knight et al. 2013). In locations where mature ash stands have been decimated, A. planipennis (EAB) still persists at low numbers surviving off of young trees (K.S. Knight, pers. comm.). It is unknown if ash trees will be able to rebound from this initial exposure to EAB. My research will use an approach that combines literature review, targeted field studies, and greenhouse experiments with population viability analysis (PVA) to model population dynamics of green ash trees over time. For my dissertation research, I plan to answer questions related to the probability of future green ash tree (F. pennsylvanica) persistence in natural floodplain settings.