Rachel Coppock

Rachel Coppock
Plymouth Marine Laboratory | PML · Marine Ecology and Biodiversity

Doctor of Philosophy

About

13
Publications
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Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Plastic litter is found everywhere. Walk onto any beach around the world and you will almost certainly find plastic. The harm that large plastic litter can cause to marine animals is well-known; for example, you may have seen sad pictures of turtles eating plastic bags or seals tangled in discarded fishing nets. However, scientists are also concern...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastics are ubiquitous in the marine environment, however, the mechanisms governing their uptake by, and burial within, seabed habitats are poorly understood. In this study, microplastic burial and its impact on fauna-mediated sedimentary processes was quantified at three coastal sites, the potential contribution of burrowing faunal communiti...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastic debris is ubiquitous and yet sampling, classifying and enumerating this prolific pollutant in marine waters has proven challenging. Typically, waterborne microplastic sampling is undertaken using nets with a 333 μm mesh, which cannot account for smaller debris. In this study, we provide an estimate of the extent to which microplastic c...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastics (1 μm–5mm) are a ubiquitous marine contaminant of global concern, ingested by a wide range of marine taxa. Copepods are a key component of marine food webs, providing a source of food for higher trophic levels, and playing an important role in marine nutrient cycling. Microplastic ingestion has been documented in copepods, but knowled...
Article
Full-text available
Microplastic debris is a pervasive environmental contaminant that has the potential to impact the health of biota, although its modes of action remain somewhat unclear. The current study tested the hypothesis that exposure to fibrous and particulate microplastics would alter feeding, impacting on lipid accumulation, and normal development (e.g., gr...
Method
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Supplementary Information for A small-scale, portable method for extracting microplastics from marine sediments. Coppock et al., 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2017.07.017
Article
Full-text available
Microplastics (plastic particles, 0.1 mme5 mm in size) are widespread marine pollutants, accumulating in benthic sediments and shorelines the world over. To gain a clearer understanding of microplastic availability to marine life, and the risks they pose to the health of benthic communities, ecological processes and food security, it is important t...
Data
Table S1: A comparison of methods using during this study at University of Barcelona (UB), Plymouth University (PU) and Natural History Museum (NHM), and used by Van Cauwenberghe et al. (2013). The table is followed by a short discussion about the methodological differences. Table S2: Raw data showing sample extraction method, volume of sediment pr...
Data
Full-text available
Fig S2. The quantity and type of plastic and rayon fibres found in 50 ml of sediment (a) by sample, (b) total proportion of each microfibre type. The following are all in the same file
Article
Full-text available
Marine debris, mostly consisting of plastic, is a global problem, negatively impacting wildlife, tourism and shipping. However, despite the durability of plastic, and the exponential increase in its production, monitoring data show limited evidence of concomitant increasing concentrations in marine habitats. There appears to be a considerable propo...