Rachael Lappan

Rachael Lappan
Monash University (Australia) · Department of Microbiology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
2,362
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201
Citations

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a gold standard method for the detection and quantification of pathogenic organisms. Standard qPCR is inexpensive, sensitive and highly specific to the pathogen of interest. While qPCR assays can be multiplexed to allow the detection of multiple organisms in one reaction, it is prohibitively labour i...
Preprint
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Molecular hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) are supersaturated in seawater relative to the atmosphere and hence are readily accessible energy sources for marine microbial communities. Yet while marine CO oxidation is well-described, it is unknown whether seawater communities consume H2. Here we integrated genome-resolved metagenomics, biogeoch...
Article
Full-text available
Throughout coastal Antarctica, ice shelves separate oceanic waters from sunlight by hundreds of meters of ice. Historical studies have detected activity of nitrifying microorganisms in oceanic cavities below permanent ice shelves. However, little is known about the microbial composition and pathways that mediate these activities. In this study, we...
Article
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Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, a rare but chronic debilitating skin and soft tissue disease found predominantly in West Africa and Southeast Australia. While a moderate body of research has examined the distribution of M. ulcerans, the specific route(s) of transmission of this bacterium remain unknown, hindering cont...
Article
Significance Termites are textbook examples of the “extended phenotype” given their ability to construct complex mounds and regulate environments. Here, we show that termites also control microbial composition and biogeochemical cycling in their mounds through their emissions of hydrogen. These emissions drive remarkable enrichments of mound bacter...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Multiple bacteria, viruses, protists, and helminths cause enteric infections that greatly impact human health and wellbeing. These enteropathogens are transmited via several pathways through human, animal, and environmental reservoirs. Individual qPCR assays have been extensively used to detect enteropathogens within these types of sam...
Article
The permeable (sandy) sediments that dominate the world’s coastlines and continental shelves are highly exposed to nitrogen pollution, predominantly due to increased urbanisation and inefficient agricultural practices. This leads to eutrophication, accumulation of drift algae and changes in the reactions of nitrogen, including the potential to prod...
Article
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Introduction Increasing urban populations have led to the growth of informal settlements, with contaminated environments linked to poor human health through a range of interlinked pathways. Here, we describe the design and methods for the Revitalising Informal Settlements and their Environments (RISE) study, a transdisciplinary randomised trial eva...
Article
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Desert ecosystems, spanning a third of the earth’s surface, harbor remarkably diverse microbial life despite having a low potential for photosynthesis. In this work, we reveal that atmospheric hydrogen serves as a major previously overlooked energy source for a large proportion of desert bacteria. We show that both chemoheterotrophic and photoautot...
Article
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Termite mounds have recently been confirmed to mitigate approximately half of termite methane (CH4) emissions, but the aerobic CH4 oxidising bacteria (methanotrophs) responsible for this consumption have not been resolved. Here, we describe the abundance, composition and CH4 oxidation kinetics of the methanotroph communities in the mounds of three...
Article
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Alloiococcus otitidis and Turicella otitidis are common bacteria of the human ear. They have frequently been isolated from the middle ear of children with otitis media (OM), though their potential role in this disease remains unclear and confounded due to their presence as commensal inhabitants of the external auditory canal. In this review, we sum...
Article
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Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani remains of public health concern in rural India. Those at risk of VL are also at risk of other neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) including soil transmitted helminths. Intestinal helminths are potent regulators of host immune responses sometimes mediated through cross-talk with gut microbiot...
Article
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Moraxella catarrhalis is a human-adapted pathogen, and a major cause of otitis media (OM) and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The species is comprised of two main phylogenetic lineages, RB1 and RB2/3. Restriction-modification (R-M) systems are among the few lineage-associated genes identified in other bacterial genera...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM, recurrent ear infection) is a common childhood disease caused by bacteria termed otopathogens, for which current treatments have limited effectiveness. Generic probiotic therapies have shown promise, but seem to lack specificity. We hypothesised that healthy children with no history of AOM carry prot...

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