Rachael Christine Kent

Rachael Christine Kent
King's College London | KCL · Department of Digital Humanities

Doctor of Philosophy
Research into the impact of digital technology on mental and physical health https://www.drdigitalhealth.co.uk/

About

7
Publications
2,159
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
30
Citations
Introduction
Lecturer in Digital Economy & Society Education, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London. https://www.drdigitalhealth.co.uk/ Research, teaching, and consultancy on the platform and behavioural economics of social media, digital health tools, and artificial intelligence. Specifically the intersections between technology and the body, health, and surveillance.
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
King's College London
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • BA Digital Culture: - Social Media - Digital Politics - Digital Subcultures & Communities Around the World https://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/ddh/study/handbook/programmes/ug/BAModules.aspx
November 2015 - present
King's College London
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine. Among the questions it considers are: What can the humanities contribute to healthcare? How do they differ from the sciences? And what can they tell us about illness?
January 2015 - present
King's College London
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Aims to study the impact of new media on autobiographical narratives: an impact increasing as habits and practices of self-presentation evolve rapidly in response to constantly fast-changing technology.
Education
September 2012 - September 2014
University of Brighton
Field of study
  • Creative Media
September 2006 - July 2010
University of Brighton
Field of study
  • Media and Communications Studies

Publications

Publications (7)
Chapter
Introduction Digitally tracking our lives has become a pervasive everyday practice for many of us. The emergence of the smartphone, mobile apps, devices and wearable technologies have enabled the increased growth and usage of self-tracking technologies, and social media platforms which presents new opportunities to mediate health, wellness and lif...
Preprint
Full-text available
Whether you are a regular user of social media, an educator, or internet and technology researcher, it was widely understood that the ubiquity of our digital life with our offline selves had become a pervasive dynamic relationship to navigate in our daily lives. If we thought that the datafication of life was firmly in progress with the increasing...
Article
Full-text available
Instagram and self-tracking technologies enable multiple ways to perform and represent the body and health. No research has yet explored how self-tracking technologies and self-representations of health identity on social media, in particular Instagram, influence health “sharing” online and individual health management offline. To enable a thorough...
Article
Full-text available
Instagram and self-tracking technologies enable multiple ways to perform and represent the body and health. No research has yet explored how self-tracking technologies and self-representations of health identity on social media, in particular Instagram, influence health “sharing” online and individual health management offline. To enable a thorough...
Chapter
Digital health technologies, self-tracking devices and social media platforms enable a variety of ways to represent ‘health’. Such practices are often celebrated as empowering, promising to revolutionise healthcare through increased ‘self-knowledge’ and sharing of data (Townsend in Smart Citizens, Future Everything Publications, 2013; Wei in Mobile...