Rachael Bond

Rachael Bond
University of Sussex · School of Psychology

PhD

About

5
Publications
573
Reads
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1
Citation
Citations since 2016
3 Research Items
1 Citation
20162017201820192020202120220.00.20.40.60.81.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.20.40.60.81.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.20.40.60.81.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.20.40.60.81.0
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - present
University of Sussex
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Research fellow in Quantum Cognition
Education
September 2014 - January 2018
University of Sussex
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2013 - September 2014
University of Surrey
Field of study
  • Psychology
January 2012 - September 2013
Lancaster University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (5)
Preprint
Full-text available
This article presents a new interpretation of the structure of subjective Bayesian probability spaces. Rather than assuming the linear space of classical statistical theory, it is proposed that Bayes' theorem demands a curved, non-linear probability space. This finding challenges over 250 years of accepted assumptions about Bayes Theorem and necess...
Presentation
Full-text available
Presentation, with explanatory notes, of lecture delivered to the Open University Psychological Society in Brighton, UK, on 20th March, 2019
Thesis
Full-text available
“Pseudodiagnostic" patterns of information search were first classified by Doherty et al. (1979), predicated on their assertion that only the selection of data that allow for the calculation of Bayseian probability ratios may be considered rational. However, with the exception of Crupi et al. (2009), who have argued for an epistemological explanati...
Presentation
Full-text available
Pseudodiagnosticity ; Quantum probability ; Quantum Bayes' theorem ; Relational Information Theory
Article
Full-text available
The ability to calculate precise likelihood ratios is fundamental to many STEM areas, such as decision-making theory, biomedical science, and engineering. However, there is no assumption-free statistical methodology to achieve this. For instance, in the absence of data relating to covariate overlap, the widely used Bayes' theorem either defaults to...

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