R Bruce McMillan

R Bruce McMillan
University of Missouri | Mizzou · Department of Anthropology

PhD University of Colorado-Boulder

About

31
Publications
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286
Citations
Introduction
R Bruce McMillan currently works at the Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri. Bruce does research in Archaeology. Their current project is 'The life and times of Albert C. Koch'.

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Indigenous people throughout Native America often bestowed special meaning and veneration upon certain landscape features. This is the case for a series of artesian springs in the upper Osage River basin in western Missouri. Artifacts and features recorded at four springs near the confluence of the Pomme de Terre and Osage Rivers indicate that part...
Article
The Kimmswick 'bone bed', a late Wisconsin paleontological locality in Jefferson County, Missouri, south of St. Louis, has been known since the early nineteenth century. The site gained international recognition in 1843 when a German immigrant and enterprising entrepreneur, Albert Koch, sold a composite skeleton of an American mastodon to the Briti...
Article
Full-text available
Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana Ord) remains from archaeological sites in west-central Missouri and northwest Arkansas record the presence of the taxon in middle Holocene contexts as far east as the Cherokee Plain- Ozark Highland border. Pronghorn appear initially during the onset of middle Holocene warming and prairie expan- sion (ca. 9000 cal B....
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Full-text available
As early as the mid-nineteenth century, fossil evidence for bison recovered from salt springs and alluvial sediments suggested that bison had a long history in the southern Prairie Peninsula (Broadhead 1877:xxii–xxiii; Harlan 1843:70; Hay 1924:191–192). This keystone herbivore of the prairie-plains was present in small herds throughout Missouri at...
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Full-text available
Fossil-bearing sites containing predominantly mastodon, Mammut americanum, remains were discovered west of the Mississippi River on the Osage River in Upper Louisiana only a few decades after the discovery by Longueuil of similar remains at Big Bone Lick in Kentucky. The first excavations were conducted in the 1790s by Pierre Chouteau, a fur trader...
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Full-text available
The career of W. Raymond Wood is reviewed in terms of his contributions to interdisciplinary studies in archaeology. This paper contends that his academic training at the University of Nebraska and the University of Oregon influenced this holistic approach to archaeological research. Examples of his interdisciplinary approach to research are descri...
Chapter
Full-text available
Data on bison remains compiled for 133 localities in 44 Illinois counties demonstrate that bison entered Illinois in the early Holocene (~8,000 14 C yr B.P.), began to increase in numbers after 4,000 14 C yr B.P., and then increased dramatically after the A.D. 1500s. Perspectives on the age and distribution of bison populations in Illinois have bee...
Chapter
Full-text available
There are several "rites of passage" that one can define in the career of a scientist whose life has been devoted to the pursuit of scholarly research. Retirement is one of these. and in this case it is the close of Paul Parmalee's tenure as Director of the Frank H. McClung Museum and Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of...
Article
Evidence from several disciplines supports the proposition that following the Wisconsinan and an initial but brief moist phase of the Holocene, there was a gradual drying trend in the mid-continent Prairie Peninsula that peaked about 7000 years ago, a pattern that was not reversed until about 4000 years ago. Except for minor perturbations, conditio...
Article
One of the major research objectives at Rodgers Shelter is to explicate the changing relationships between the prehistoric inhabitants and their natural environment. The analysis of the material culture is along lines that maximize the available information on the nature of this cultural-environmental intersystemic articulation. This chapter presen...
Article
This chapter discusses the dynamics of cultural and environmental change at Rodgers Shelter, Missouri. The cultural record at Rodgers Shelter is viewed in terms of changes in activities as reflected by faunal and activity indicator frequencies rather than in terms of changes in artifact frequencies. This orientation is in keeping with the emphasis...
Chapter
This chapter discusses subsistence patterns at Rodgers shelter. Bird remains constituted less than 4% of the total faunal sample. The majority of bones were from wild turkey and small perching birds. There were a few elements of waterfowl, other gallinaceous species, and raptorial birds. None of the ducks could be identified to species, but a few e...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the settings of Pomme de Terre. The lower Pomme de Terre River drainage constitutes a part of the western border of the Ozark Highland where this dissected plateau merges with Missouri's unglaciated prairie region. This is approximately 95 km north of Springfield, Missouri and 150 km southeast of Kansas City. This river is an...
Chapter
One of the pioneers of nineteenth-century fossil collecting in North America was Albert C. Koch (1804-1867), a German immigrant born in Roitzsch in Saxony, who moved to the United States when he was 22. This chapter presents a review of Koch's I840 Pomme de Terre expeditions. The major part of Koch's fossil vertebrate collection came from three loc...
Chapter
A focal point of the archeological excavations in the Pomme de Terre basin was at Rodgers Shelter, where an overhanging dolomite bluff protects an area of just over 100 m2 at the base of the Holocene terrace (Tl-b). The site was located in the spring of 1962 by Rolland E. Pangborn of the University of Missouri-Columbia and, subsequently, was design...
Article
An Early Woodland storage pit, dated at 1920±50 BP, was found in the peat layer surrounding the spring feeder at Boney Spring, Benton County, western Missouri, in association with a burial and other cultural material. The pit contents were unusually well preserved, apparently because of the saturated condition of the spring deposits. Materials from...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Colorado, 1971. Includes bibliographical references (leaves [194]-212). Typescript.
Article
Full-text available
A dog skeleton unearthed at Rodgers Shelter, Benton County, Missouri, came from a zone dating at approximately 5500 B.C. The animal, buried in a shallow pit beneath a tumulus of limestone rocks, is one of the earliest instances of canid interment to be recorded for North America.
Article
Three burial tumuli in southwestern Missouri near the Kansas line, indanger of destruction, were excavated by the University of Missouri. These sites, the Alberti, Amity, and Clemons Mounds, are all interpreted as components of the Fristoe Burial Complex, a Woodland mortuary complex of the we stern Ozarks. The identification of these sites as compo...

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Project (1)
Project
Interpretation of certain archaeological phenomena associated with spring deposits.