Quan Hua

Quan Hua
Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation | ANSTO · Environment

PhD

About

263
Publications
65,915
Reads
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9,195
Citations
Citations since 2016
122 Research Items
5949 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,000

Publications

Publications (263)
Article
Biogeographical patterns are increasingly modified by the human-driven translocation of species, a process that accelerated several centuries ago. Observational datasets, however, rarely range back more than a few decades, implying that a large part of invasion histories went unobserved. Small-sized organisms, like benthic foraminifera, are more li...
Article
Modern to Holocene tropical Pacific stalagmites are commonly difficult to date with the U-series, the most commonly used dating method for speleothems. When U-series does not provide robust age models, due to multiple sources of ²³⁰Th or little U, radiocarbon is, potentially, the best alternative. The ¹⁴C content of two stalagmites (Pu17 and Nu16)...
Article
Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest terrestrial C stock and soils' capacity to preserve OC varies with many factors including land use, soil type and depth. We investigated the effect of land use change on particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM) in soils. Surface (0-10 cm) and sub-surface (60-70 cm) soil sa...
Article
The plant macrofossil assemblage from Madjedbebe, Mirarr Country, northern Australia, provides insight into human-plant relationships for the ∼65,000 years of Aboriginal occupation at the site. Here we show that a diverse diet of fruits, nuts, seeds, palm and underground storage organs was consumed from the earliest occupation, with intensive plant...
Preprint
Modern to Holocene tropical Pacific stalagmites are commonly difficult to date with the U-series, the most commonly used dating method for speleothems. When U-series does not provide robust age models, due to multiple sources of 230Th or little U, radiocarbon is, potentially, the best alternative. The 14C content of two stalagmites (Pu17 and Nu16)...
Article
The archaeological record and ethnohistoric sources are combined to infer a ritual function of an isolated 40 cm diameter circular pit located above the high tide line at Kawa‘aloa bay, west Moloka‘i, Hawaiian Islands that was densely filled with bones of fish (Kuhlia sandvicensis), Green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) and the extirpated Hawaiian goos...
Article
The inter-reef Halimeda bioherms of the northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) have accumulated up to 25 m of positive relief and up to four times greater volume of calcium carbonate sediment than the nearby coral reefs during the Holocene. Covering >6000 km², the Halimeda bioherms represent a significant contribution to the development of the northeast...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cosmic rays entering the Earth’s atmosphere produce showers of secondary particles such as neutrons and muons. The interaction of these neutrons and muons with oxygen-16 (16O) in minerals such as ice and quartz can produce carbon-14 (14C). Analyses of in situ produced cosmogenic 14C in quartz are commonly used to investigate the Earth’s landscape e...
Conference Paper
Wildfires are a major source of dune activation; however, few studies have evaluated their influence on relic (stabilised) dune field development. In this study, we assess the onlapping parabolic dune sequences at the sub-tropical Cooloola Sand Mass, an ideal chronosequence in eastern Australia, to understand fires contribution to their evolution....
Research
Full-text available
Research highlight published in the Australian Institute for Nuclear Science and Engineering's (AINSE) annual report.
Article
This paper presents a compilation of atmospheric radiocarbon for the period 1950–2019, derived from atmospheric CO 2 sampling and tree rings from clean-air sites. Following the approach taken by Hua et al. (2013), our revised and extended compilation consists of zonal, hemispheric and global radiocarbon ( ¹⁴ C) data sets, with monthly data sets for...
Poster
Full-text available
Biota's role in affecting chemical changes to the Earth's surface, relative to geological processes (like climate or rock uplift), is not completely understood. This is partially due to our current inability to relate biological processes in a geomorphologically meaningful way. To help increase our capacity for such study, we developed a tool that...
Article
The development of high-resolution terrestrial palaeoclimate records in Australia is hindered by the scarcity of tree species suitable for conventional dendrochronology. However, novel analytical techniques have made it possible to obtain climate information from tree species that do not reliably form annual growth rings. In this paper we assess th...
Article
Cerberiopsis candelabra Vieill. is a long-lived, monocarpic (= semelparous) and mass-flowering rain-forest tree, endemic to New Caledonia. Population size structures suggest establishment has been episodic, followed by a recruitment gap that might signal population decline. Here, we use age structures based on tree rings to better assess population...
Article
Paleobiological and paleoecological interpretations rely on constraining the temporal resolution of the fossil record. The taphonomic clock, that is, a correlation between the alteration of skeletal material and its age, is an approach for quantifying time-averaging scales. We test the taphonomic clock hypothesis for marine demersal and pelagic fis...
Article
Full-text available
We present stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope records from two partially coeval speleothems from Manita peć Cave, Croatia. The cave is located close to the Adriatic coast (3.7 km) at an elevation of 570 m a.s.l. The site experienced competing Mediterranean and continental climate influences throughout the last glacial cycle and was situ...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
A palynological record spanning the last glacial–interglacial period was derived from high-resolution, deep-sea core MD03-2607, located near Kangaroo Island in South Australia. The core site lies opposite the mouth of the River Murray that, together with the Darling River, drains the extensive (∼1.6 × 10⁶ km²) Murray-Darling Basin (MDB). The record...
Article
Significance The geomagnetic field contains information about interior dynamics of the Earth and is closely related to human beings on maintaining a habitable planet. Understanding variations of the field in the past, especially during the Holocene, is helpful for deciphering modern geomagnetic behaviors or even predicting future variations. Archae...
Article
Full-text available
Important uncertainties remain in our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric hydroxyl radical concentration ([OH]). Carbon-14-containing carbon monoxide (14CO) is a useful tracer that can help in the characterization of [OH] variability. Prior measurements of atmospheric 14CO concentration ([14CO] are limited in both t...
Article
Full-text available
Little is known about the Pleistocene climatic context of northern Australia at the time of early human settlement. Here we generate a palaeoprecipitation proxy using stable carbon isotope analysis of modern and archaeological pandanus nutshell from Madjedbebe, Australia’s oldest known archaeological site. We document fluctuations in precipitation...
Article
Full-text available
Groundwaters host vital resources playing a key role in the near future. Subterranean fauna and microbes are crucial in regulating organic cycles in environments characterized by low energy and scarce carbon availability. However, our knowledge about the functioning of groundwater ecosystems is limited, despite being increasingly exposed to anthrop...
Article
Full-text available
The northern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Halimeda bioherms have accumulated on the outer continental shelf from calcium carbonate algal sediments over the past ~10,000 years and cover >6000 km2 of shelf area. As such, Halimeda bioherms play a key role in the shallow marine carbon cycle over millennial timescales. The main source of nitrogen (N) to the...
Article
Full-text available
When European colonists arrived in the late 19th century, large villages dotted the coastline of the Gulf of Papua (southern Papua New Guinea). These central places sustained long-distance exchange and decade-spanning ceremonial cycles. Besides ethnohistoric records, little is known of the villages' antiquity, spatiality, or development. Here we co...
Article
Full-text available
The direct carbonate procedure for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon (AMS ¹⁴ C) dating of submilligram samples of biogenic carbonate without graphitization is becoming widely used in a variety of studies. We compare the results of 153 paired direct carbonate and standard graphite ¹⁴ C determinations on single specimens of an assortment of b...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming causes the poleward shift of the trailing edges of marine ectotherm species distributions. In the semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea, continental masses and oceanographic barriers do not allow natural connectivity with thermophilic species pools: as trailing edges retreat, a net diversity loss occurs. We quantify this loss on the Israel...
Article
Full-text available
The tall (>4 m), charismatic and threatened columnar cacti, pasacana [Echinopsis atacamensis (Vaupel) Friedrich & G.D. Rowley)], grows on the Bolivian Altiplano and provides environmental and economic value to these extremely cold, arid and high-elevation (~4000 m) ecosystems. Yet very little is known about their growth rates, ages, demography and...
Article
Full-text available
The ongoing development of Jeh Island in the Marshall Islands was investigated using aerial photographs, high‐resolution satellite imagery, and radiometric dating of island sediments. Remote sensing observations show the present‐day island of Jeh is the product of two or more smaller islands merging together between 1943 and 2006 which are continui...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Measured rates of soil production are faster in the western Southern Alps of New Zealand than anywhere else on the planet; exceeding what our current geomorphic understanding allows for. One potential explanation for the presence of such rapid rates may be that biological processes help to facilitate soil production when it should otherwise be limi...
Article
The River Murray Estuary, South Australia exhibits a morphology typical of a wave-dominated estuary and comprises two large, shallow central basin lakes – Lakes Alexandrina and Albert. Contested interpretations of the estuary’s limnological history and uncertainty surrounding the sustainability of current basin water usage practice warrant a robust...
Article
Understanding the marine radiocarbon reservoir effect (i.e., marine radiocarbon reservoir age (R) and/or correction (DR)) is important for the construction of robust radiocarbon chronologies for marine archives for various research areas including archaeology, palaeoecology, paleoceanography, Quaternary research and climate change studies. In this...
Preprint
Full-text available
Important uncertainties remain in our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric hydroxyl radical concentration ([OH]). Carbon-14-containing carbon monoxide (14CO) is a useful tracer that can help in the characterization of [OH] variability. Prior measurements of atmospheric 14CO concentration ([14CO] are limited in both t...
Article
Full-text available
A massive mangrove dieback event occurred in 2015–2016 along ∼1000 km of pristine coastline in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia. Here, we use sediment and wood chronologies to gain insights into geochemical and climatic changes related to this dieback. The unique combination of low rainfall and low sea level observed during the dieback event had...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwater ecosystems play a key role in shaping the global carbon cycle and maintaining the ecological balance that sustains biodiversity worldwide. Surficial water bodies are often interconnected with groundwater, forming a physical continuum, and their interaction has been reported as a crucial driver for organic matter (OM) inputs in groundwate...
Article
Full-text available
Early researchers of radiocarbon levels in Southern Hemisphere tree rings identified a variable North-South hemispheric offset, necessitating construction of a separate radiocarbon calibration curve for the South. We present here SHCal20, a revised calibration curve from 0-55,000 cal BP, based upon SHCal13 and fortified by the addition of 14 new tr...
Article
Full-text available
Food web dynamics are vital in shaping the functional ecology of ecosystems. However, trophic ecology is still in its infancy in groundwater ecosystems due to the cryptic nature of these environments. To unravel trophic interactions between subterranean biota, we applied an interdisciplinary Bayesian mixing model design (multi‐factor BMM) based on...
Article
Taphonomic processes are informative about the magnitude and timing of paleoecological changes but remain poorly understood with respect to freshwater invertebrates in spring-fed rivers and streams. We compared taphonomic alteration among freshwater gastropods in live, dead (surficial shell accumulations), and fossil (late Pleistocene–early Holocen...
Data
Publisher: Dryad https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2z34tmpj7 Citation Saccò, Mattia et al. (2021), Data from: Refining trophic dynamics through multi-factor Bayesian mixing models: a case study of subterranean beetles., v3, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.2z34tmpj7 Abstract Food web dynamics are vital in shaping the functional ecology of ecosyst...
Article
Aboriginal culturally modified trees are a distinctive feature of the Australian archaeological record, generating insights into Aboriginal interactions with wood and bark, which rarely survive in archaeological contexts. However, they are under-studied, in decline and typically presumed to pre-date the 20th century. Here we investigate the origin...
Presentation
Full-text available
It is well accepted that secondary minerals, formed by chemical weathering, stabilize soil organic carbon (SOC) (1, 2). The interactions between chemical weathering products and organic carbon has been well studied (3) however, little is known about the relationship between the rates of SOC turnover, a biological process, and rates of chemical weat...
Article
Full-text available
Aboriginal culturally modified trees are a distinctive feature of the Australian archaeological record, generating insights into Aboriginal interactions with wood and bark, which rarely survive in archaeological contexts. However, they are under-studied, in decline and typically presumed to pre-date the 20th century. Here we investigate the origin...
Article
Appropriate fire management strategies are needed to protect forests and large old ecologically and culturally significant trees in natural landscapes. The aim of this study was to determine the age of large old and relic trees of cultural significance that included Cypress Pine (Callitris columellaris F. Muell.), a species that is sensitive to cro...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of paleocommunities and trophic webs assume that multispecies assemblages consist of species that coexisted in the same habitat over the duration of time averaging. However, even species with similar durability can differ in age within a single fossil assemblage. Here, we tested whether skeletal remains of different phyla and trophic guilds...
Article
Contemporary understanding of Holocene coral reef development is based primarily on sub-surface investigations of reef flat, back reef and lagoon zones. Few studies of Holocene fore reef development exist, constituting a significant gap in our understanding of reef evolution. The spur and groove (SaG) zone is a distinct, understudied, feature of fo...
Article
Small burden from old sources Methane is a potent greenhouse gas with large natural sources, reservoirs, and sinks. Dyonisius et al. found that methane emissions from old, cold-region carbon reservoirs like permafrost and methane hydrates were minor during the last deglaciation (see the Perspective by Dean). They analyzed the carbon isotopic compos...
Article
Full-text available
Atmospheric methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, and its mole fraction has more than doubled since the preindustrial era¹. Fossil fuel extraction and use are among the largest anthropogenic sources of CH4 emissions, but the precise magnitude of these contributions is a subject of debate2,3. Carbon-14 in CH4 (¹⁴CH4) can be used to distinguish b...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. A massive mangrove dieback event occurred in 2015/2016 along ~ 1000 km of pristine coastline in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia. To gain insights into dieback drivers, we combine sediment and wood chronologies to analyze geochemical and climatic changes. The unique combination of low rainfall and low sea level observed during the dieba...
Article
Iron-production sites of the early historic period in Mainland Southeast Asia (fifth to fifteenth centuries AD) are rare. Recent excavations at the Tonle Bak site in central Cambodia now provide the first evidence for furnace technology, metallurgical characteristics of slag concentrations and evidence for the organisation of local smelting communi...
Article
Full-text available
Saltmarshes provide many valuable ecosystem services including storage of a large amount of ‘blue carbon’ within their soils. To date, up to 50% of the world’s saltmarshes have been lost or severely degraded primarily due to a variety of anthropogenic pressures. Previous efforts have aimed to restore saltmarshes and their ecosystem functions, but t...
Article
Forging empire: Angkorian iron smelting, community and ritual practice at Tonle Bak - Volume 93 Issue 372 - Mitch Hendrickson, Stéphanie Leroy, Cristina Castillo, Quan Hua, Enrique Vega, Kaseka Phon
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract. Soil organic carbon (OC) is the largest terrestrial C stock and soils' capacity to preserve OC varies with many factors including land use, soil type and depth. We investigated the effect of land use change on particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM) in soils. Surface (0–10 cm) and sub-surface (60–70 cm...
Article
Global sea-level rise since the Nineteenth Century is expected to eventually cause recession of many shores, however most swell-exposed sandy beaches have not yet shown such response. This study analysed a 70-year air photo and beach profile record for swell-dominated Ocean Beach (western Tasmania) to show an abrupt change of long-term shoreline po...
Preprint
Carbon-14 ($^{14}$C) is produced in the atmosphere when neutrons from cosmic-ray air showers are captured by $^{14}$N nuclei. Atmospheric $^{14}$C becomes trapped in air bubbles in polar ice as compacted snow (firn) transforms into ice. $^{14}$C is also produced in situ in ice grains by penetrating cosmic-ray neutrons and muons. Recent ice core mea...
Conference Paper
Many parts of tropical and subtropical Australia lack both annually-resolved long-term instrumental climate data and proxy climate records. This limits our understanding of past climate patterns and impacts. There are however, remnant forest stands where dendroclimatology could be applied to extend the climate record. Early studies into tropical Au...