Qijun Han

Qijun Han
Nanjing University of Science and Technology | NJUST · School of Foreign Studies

Phd

About

34
Publications
9,709
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
70
Citations

Publications

Publications (34)
Preprint
In the field of contemporary Chinese cinema, the theme of filial piety has served as a key concept for a large number of Chinese-language films, covering various genres from melodrama to martial arts. Through a detailed narrative analysis of the cultural practices and identity politics in the filmic text, this article examines the way in which the...
Book
Full-text available
This book explores societal vulnerabilities highlighted within cinema and develops an interpretive framework for understanding the depiction of societal responses to epidemic disease outbreaks across cinematic history. Drawing on a large database of twentieth- and twenty-first-century films depicting epidemics, the study looks into issues including...
Chapter
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
En analysant Youth (Feng Xiaogang, 2017), film sorti il n’y a pas longtemps, et son extraordinaire popularité en Chine, cet article entend se pencher sur les débats actuels concernant le rôle du cinéma en évoquant la nostalgie à travers la référence continuelle au passé national. Dérivé du roman semi-biographique You Touched Me du romancier chinois...
Article
Using the concept of nostalgia, this paper scrutinizes the Chinese countryside depicted in film; focusing on sharp changes resulting from modernization and nation building. Three frameworks are discussed. The first is a nostalgic idealization, and the second is an ambivalent nostalgia towards the countryside where traditional values and customs suc...
Article
Full-text available
During COVID-19, acts of ‘heroism’ – particularly by ordinary people ‘from below’ – have been foregrounded, prompting complicated ethical issues in the public health context. By analysing examples from a large corpus of films about epidemics across the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries, this article investigates how cinema has represented publi...
Article
This article analyses the authenticity principles connected to Hollywood’s portrayal of China and the Chinese through three important American films screened or banned in China – Broken Blossoms (1919), Shanghai Express (1932), and The Good Earth (1937) – but with a special focus on both the historical reception and censorship of these films within...
Article
Full-text available
Data from famines from the nineteenth century onward suggest that women hold a mortality advantage during times of acute malnutrition, while modern laboratory research suggests that women are more resilient to most pathogens causing epidemic diseases. There is, however, a paucity of sex-disaggregated mortality data for the period prior to the Indus...
Article
Literature from various social science and humanities disciplines has pointed to the fear, stress, threats, and hardship frequently experienced by children of immigrants. In coping with the stereotyped images such as ‘the model minority’ and ‘the perpetual foreigner’, the subject of Chinese American children and youth has drawn much scholarly atten...
Article
Full-text available
One key factor that appears to be crucial in the rejection of quarantines, isolation and other social controls during epidemic outbreaks is trust—or rather distrust. Much like news reporting and social media, popular culture such as fictional novels, television shows and films can influence people’s trust, especially given that the information prov...
Article
Full-text available
Films illustrate 2 ways that epidemics can affect societies: fear leading to a breakdown in sociability and fear stimulating preservation of tightly held social norms. The first response is often informed by concern over perceived moral failings within society, the second response by the application of arbitrary or excessive controls from outside t...
Article
Full-text available
The immigrant Chinese family has increasingly been represented in transnational Chinese cinema(s) over the past three decades. Two representative films, The Wedding Banquet (Lee, 1993) and Saving Face (Wu, 2004), are chosen to shed light on Chinese filmmakers' engagement with the complex process of identity formation for immigrants through the arti...
Article
Full-text available
In the field of cultural studies, the notion of “Chineseness” has been problematised and challenged, especially by overseas Chinese scholars. This article suggests that Chineseness can in fact be viewed as an open signifier that is in a state of continuous construction and negotiation, drawing upon Stuart Hall's theory of cultural identity and dias...
Article
Full-text available
Within the field of Asian American studies, there has been an abundance of research on the cinematic representation of Chinese Americans in association with identity. While one type of study primarily focuses on the Orientalist discourse and racial politics in the Hollywood films, another approach highlights the production and distribution of Asian...
Book
There has been an increasing recognition of the fluidity and ambiguity of ethnic identities within the context of global mobility. With that in mind, how have films constructed the identity of ethnic Chinese in the United States? This book addresses this issue through three sub-questions. First, why is the family narrative so characteristic of film...
Article
Full-text available
In the field of contemporary Chinese cinema, the theme of filial piety has served as a key concept for a large number of Chinese-language films, covering various genres from melodrama to martial arts. Through a detailed narrative analysis of the cultural practices and identity politics in the filmic text, this article examines the way in which the...
Article
Full-text available
This article establishes melodrama as a contextually and culturally conditioned subject, by drawing attention to Chinese melodrama films produced during the 1920s and 1930s – a period in which moral, social and political issues seemed to be most urgent and problematic. It begins with a clarification of the term ‘melodrama’ and then focuses on cinem...
Article
Full-text available
Moving away from the generic approach to melodrama, this article attempts to add a historical perspective to the ongoing debate over melodrama in Chinese cinema studies. By focusing on the Chinese exhibition and reception of D. W. Griffith’s melodrama films in the 1920s, and the impact of Griffith on Chinese film history, it proposes a critical met...
Article
Full-text available
Being embedded in the interdisciplinary area of media and culture studies, this articlel explores the family melodrama in transnational Chinese cinema drawing upon theoretical discussions with regard to the historical emergence of melodrama in correspondence to, as Th. Elsaesser says, “periods of intense social and ideological crisis”. While servin...

Network

Cited By