Priya Satalkar

Priya Satalkar
Ghent University | UGhent · Department of Philosophy and Moral Sciences

MBBS, MPH, MSc, EMMB, Dr.sc.med.

About

28
Publications
4,628
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376
Citations
Introduction
I have interdisciplinary training in medicine (India, 2003), public health and epidemiology (Bangladesh, 2007), medical anthropology (the Netherlands, 2010) and bioethics (Belgium, the Netherlands and Italy, 2011). I received PhD at the Institute for Biomedical Ethics (IBMB) in February 2016. I am currently a FWO Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at Ghent University and work on ethics of Assisted Reproduction.
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - present
Ghent University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • My project aims to contribute ethnographic insights from India - an Asian lower-middle-income country - to the global literature on user perspectives on EEF by 1) examining Indian women’s views and decisions about EEF and the views of their male family members and friends, and 2) analyzing if the act of using EEF is a deliberate expression of women’s reproductive choice that ‘disrupts’ Indian social norms on marriage and family creation.
January 2020 - December 2021
Ghent University
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • The goal of this research project was to understand the socio-cultural and regulatory factors influencing preference of married couples in India suffering from infertility or subfertility regarding means of family formation. I interviewed 23 Indian families who chose adoption as pathway to parenthood
January 2018 - June 2019
King's College London
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • I investigated the role played by the IVF specialists in urban India to popularize elective egg freezing.

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Background Global literature on medical travel focuses on patients from high-income countries traveling to middle-income countries reputed for providing high quality care at significantly lower costs. However, little is known about the movement of wealthy foreign patients to high-income countries such as the USA, the UK or Switzerland. Objective I...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: When a randomized clinical trial (RCT) prematurely discontinues, it is essential that stakeholders do the right thing to ensure that lessons can be learnt and trust in clinical research is maintained. There is, however, a lack of evidence exploring this issue. This study aimed to examine clinical trial stakeholders´ practices following...
Article
Full-text available
A small proportion of older people in the Netherlands want to end their lives because they feel their lives to be ‘completed’ and no longer worth living. Currently, there is heated debate over whether or not these people should have the right to euthanasia. Drawing on previous research, we conduct a heuristic analysis of views and experiences of th...
Article
Full-text available
Background Poor participant recruitment is the most frequent reason for premature discontinuation of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), particularly if they are investigator-initiated. The aims of this qualitative study were to investigate (1) the views of clinical trial stakeholders from three different countries regarding reasons for recruitment...
Article
Study question How do Indian healthcare professionals describe their clinical experience with and perspectives on AMH testing in Indian women seeking fertility treatments including fertility preservation? Summary answer The HCPs cautioned against AMH testing as a screening tool in presumed fertile Indian women due to its anticipated impact on wome...
Article
Study question How do Indian healthcare professionals describe their clinical experience with and perspectives on AMH testing in Indian women seeking fertility treatments including fertility preservation? Summary answer The HCPs cautioned against AMH testing as a screening tool in presumed fertile Indian women due to its anticipated impact on wome...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this paper is to analyze the attitudes and reactions of researchers towards an authorship claim made by a researcher in a position of authority who has not made any scientific contribution to a manuscript or helped to write it. This paper draws on semi-structured interviews conducted with 33 researchers at three seniority levels working...
Article
Full-text available
In this reflective essay, we explore the concept of generativity and propose it as a more positive interpretation of the experience of ‘completed life’ and its bearing on the wish to die. In 2010, more than 100,000 people in the Netherlands signed a petition requesting an extension of the existing euthanasia legislation. They asked the government t...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Structured training in research integrity, research ethics and responsible conduct of research is one strategy to reduce research misconduct and strengthen reliability of and trust in scientific evidence. However, how researchers develop their sense of integrity is not fully understood. We examined the factors and circumstances that sh...
Article
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Euthanasia in the Netherlands is based on the notion that the person seeking assistance to die is able to make an autonomous decision. The objective of this study is to explore this notion, in particular, in the case of “tiredness of life.” The article is mainly based on two qualitative researches and two selected case histories that provide an in-...
Article
Full-text available
This article analyses discussions in the Netherlands about extending the current euthanasia legislation to include older people who are tired of living and want to end life without being sick or suffering unbearable pain. We look at these discussion from a generational perspective: the present generation of older people has learned from the experie...
Article
This manuscript describes and discusses the views of researchers on the significance of raising concerns about scientific misconduct in their work environment and the reasons or circumstances that might deter them from doing so. In this exploratory qualitative research study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 33 researchers working in life scie...
Article
Despite increasing interest in integrity issues, relatively few studies have examined researchers’ own interpretations of integrity. As part of the Perspectives on Research Integrity in Science and Medicine (PRISM) project, we sought to explore how researchers themselves define research integrity. We conducted 33 semi-structured interviews with cli...
Article
Full-text available
Aims of the study: Premature discontinuation occurs in about 25% of randomised clinical trials in Switzerland; it mainly affects investigator-initiated trials and is mostly due to problems with recruitment of patients. The aim of this study was to qualitatively investigate reasons for trial discontinuation due to poor patient recruitment and sugge...
Article
Full-text available
Background In spite of efforts to employ risk-based strategies to increase monitoring efficiency in the academic setting, empirical evidence on their effectiveness remains sparse. This mixed-methods study aimed to evaluate the risk-based on-site monitoring approach currently followed at our academic institution. Methods We selected all studies moni...
Article
Full-text available
Background Participant selection for first-in-human (fih) trials involves complex decisions. The trial design makes it unlikely that participants will receive clinically relevant therapeutic benefit, but they are likely to experience risks of various magnitudes and types. The aim of the present paper was to describe and discuss the views of investi...
Article
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Nanotechnology, which involves manipulation of matter on a 'nano' scale, is considered to be a key enabling technology. Medical applications of nanotechnology (commonly known as nanomedicine) are expected to significantly improve disease diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and subsequently reduce health care costs. However, there is no consensus...
Article
Background: Obtaining valid informed consent (IC) can be challenging in first-in-human (FIH) trials in nanomedicine due to the complex interventions, the hype and hope concerning potential benefits, and fear of harms attributed to 'nano' particles. Aim: We describe and analyze the opinions of expert stakeholders involved in translational nanomed...
Article
Unlabelled: Clinical translation of breakthroughs in nanotechnology and nanomedicine is expected to significantly improve diagnostic tools and therapeutic modalities for various diseases. This will not only improve human health and well-being, but is also likely to reduce health care costs in the long run. However, clinical translation is a long,...
Article
Advances in information and communication technology have facilitated the development of online psychotherapy. This form of psychotherapy would provide the developing world with better access to professional mental healthcare services. At the same time, it is prudent to carefully consider the various ethical, legal and regulatory issues involved in...
Article
The Ebola epidemic in Western Africa has highlighted issues related to weak health systems, the politics of drug and vaccine development and the need for transparent and ethical criteria for use of scarce local and global resources during public health emergency. In this paper we explore two key themes. First, we argue that independent of any use o...
Article
In 2006, the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) published its ‘Ethical guidelines for Biomedical Research on human participants’. The intention was to translate international ethical standards into locally and culturally appropriate norms and values to help biomedical researchers in India to conduct ethical research and thereby safeguard the...
Article
Reflection is integral to ethnographic work; it situates the ethnographer’s insights, beliefs, fears, motivations and confrontations within the larger framework of investigation. But as ethnographers, do we always listen to and act upon our personal reflection? To what extent are we able to go beyond writing reflexively and turn those insights into...
Article
http://www.haujournal.org/index.php/hau/article/view/hau1.1.009 This article reports on an ethnographic experiment. Four finger eating experts and three novices sat down for a hot meal and ate with their hands. Drawing on the technique of playing with the familiar and the strange, our aim was not to explain our responses, but to articulate them. As...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports on an ethnographic experiment. Four finger eating experts and three novices sat down for a hot meal and ate with their hands. Drawing on the technique of playing with the familiar and the strange, our aim was not to explain our responses, but to articulate them. As we seek words to do so, we are compelled to stretch the verb "t...
Article
In this paper, we discuss the perceptions of people from a Bangladeshi village about what they considered to be ‘mental illness’. Observations, informal conversations, interviews, focus group discussions, and illness narratives include the perspectives of both the caregivers and the patients in Kakabo. The villagers provided us with local terms (e....

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
We are exploring views of scientists in Switzerland on research and scientific integrity through in-depth qualitative interviews in this exploratory research project funded by Swiss Academy of Medical Sciences.