Porrawee Pomchote

Porrawee Pomchote
Kyoto University | Kyodai · Department of Biological Sciences

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18
Publications
7,567
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170
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
134 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030
20162017201820192020202120220102030
Introduction
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Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Amphibians are facing extinction on a global scale and maintaining small populations of threatened or endangered species in captivity is essential. In connection with potential captive breeding of Panha’s crocodile newt, Tylototriton panhai, we report a detailed husbandry protocol and describe breeding and mating behaviour. After six years in capti...
Article
Full-text available
We describe a new species of the newt genus Tylototriton from Umphang Wildlife Sanctuary, Tak Province , western Thailand based on molecular and morphological evidence and named here as Tylototriton umphangensis sp. nov. The new species is assigned to the subgenus Tylototriton and differs from other species in having dark-brown to blackish-brown bo...
Article
Full-text available
Herein, we provided a morphological description combined with a phylogenetic analysis of the northernmost Thai Tylototriton population, which was found in Doi Pha Hom Pok National Park (DPHPNP), Chiang Mai Province, northern Thailand. Three adult males were collected from a small breeding pond during our survey in July 2020. Based on molecular (two...
Chapter
Eine große morphologische Vielfalt innerhalb dieses Taxons wurde in Populationen beobachtet, die in Nordthailand und den angrenzenden Bergen in Myanmar beheimatet sind, so dass weitere neue Arten erst kürzlich beschrieben wurden. Uénos Krokodilmolch ist mit 17,5 cm eine mittelgroße Art, die in der Nähe von Gewässern subtropischer feuchter Laub- und...
Article
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Résumé – Extension d'aire de Tylototriton uyenoi découvert au Parc National de Mae Wong, province de Kamphaeng Phet, Thaïlande de l'Ouest. La salamandre crocodile d'Uéno a été observée pour la première fois au parc national de Mae Wong dans la province de Khamphaeng Phet, Thaïlande de l'ouest. Une seule femelle adulte a été trouvée au site de campe...
Article
Full-text available
Here we report a new locality of the Angular headed crocodile newt, Tylototriton anguliceps in Khun Chae National Park, Chiang Rai Province in Northern Thailand. Two adult specimens were found hiding under an amount of volcanic rocks in a coffee plantation surrounded by scattered pieces of evergreen and broad-leaved forests near a small slow-flowin...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of the genus Tylototriton, obtained from Doi Phu Kha National Park, Nan Province, northern Thailand, is described based on molecular and morphological evidence and named herein as Tylototriton phukhaensis sp. nov. The new species is morphologically distinct from the four known Thai Tylototriton species (T. panhai, T. uyenoi, T. anguli...
Article
The Asian newt genus Tylototriton, is the only urodelan genus currently recorded in Thailand. For a long time in the past, T. verrucosus was the sole known urodelan species found in Thailand, but was recently shown to be comprised of three cryptic species, T. uyenoi, T. anguliceps, and T. panhai. However, in our molecular study, the newts from Doi...
Article
Full-text available
New southernmost record for Tylototriton in Southeastern Asia. Nouvelle localité la plus méridionale du genre Tylototriton: Tylototriton uyenoi Nishikawa, Khonsue, Pomchote & Matsui 2013 découvert au parc national de Khao Laem, province de Kanchanaburi, Thaïlande de l’ouest. La salamandre crocodile d’Uéno a été observée pour la première fois dans...
Article
The age-related changes in lumbar vertebrae were studied in 77 young/full adult Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) (40 females, 37 males), in terms of their morphometry, density and osteophytosis, and the interrelationship between these three aspects. The most common age-related pattern of morphometric changes was an initial increase during young a...
Article
Full-text available
Three morphological groups are found in a salamandrid newt Tylototriton shanjing from Thailand. We describe two of them as new species, one from northern and the other from northeastern Thailand, based on molecular and morphological data, however we could not make a taxonomic decision on the remaining one group because of the lack of voucher specim...
Article
Based on previous conflicting reports that the two forms of pig-tailed macaque (northern and southern) exist as separate species, subspecies, or forms, and that their boundary zone lies in Thailand, a survey of the distribution range and morphology of pig-tailed macaques in Thailand was conducted during 2003-2010. We first conducted a questionnaire...
Article
Full-text available
Field surveys were carried out at 14 locations in seven provinces of Thailand, from December 2001 to September 2006, searching for the Himalayan newt (Tylototriton verrucosus Anderson, 1871). The newt was found at 11 of the 14 locations visited, eight of which constitute new locality records for the species within Thailand. Our observations show th...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Be that as it may, more than 41% of amphibian species are thought of as ‘endangered’, including 54.7% of the Urodela group. In this case, the well-known family Salamandridae contained not less than 27 threatened species as of 2015. 56 species are still not evaluated by the IUCN and are classed data deficient (DD) in 2018. North and Central America and Asia are most severely affected by the continued destruction of habitats and the spread of chytrid (Bd). In Asia, the human consumption of many species has become also a major issue (Hernandez 2015a, 2016a,b,c). Thus, the main factors are grouped here: 1) Habitat destruction and alteration [in France, the area covered by roads is greater than that of protected areas] with Asia, Central and South America being most severely affected; 2) Climate change; 3) Pollution 4) The increasing emergence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis since the 1980s [and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans since 2013]; 5) The overexploitation of natural resources (trade in endangered species, use in traditional medicine (Andrias, Tylototriton in China), and as food (Asia, Mexico); 5) The introduction of potentially invasive alien species (red-eared slider, red swamp crayfish, bullfrog a.o. in Europe) that thrive to the detriment of native species. As a result, species conservation is complex and depends on many interdependent players: countries and states, institutions, NGOs, etc., which need to agree on who will do what, where and when. Most of these projects take time, while the crisis will continue to severely worsen with every passing year (Gascon et al. 2007). Some species have already become extinct and more are likely to follow suit. Effective conservation is key to pulling back at least some species from the brink of extinction. Nature and species conservation have in fact turned into a new scientific discipline that primarily makes use of two techniques: ex situ (off-site) and in situ (on-site) initiatives. The crises at its base increased in number and accelerated due to changes in our society. While biodiversity could largely survive at times of traditional land management practices, the industrial revolution that began in the 19th century has made humans more and more unaware of the value of their natural heritage and mass destruction an everyday occurrence by now. First and foremost in this are the excessive and poorly managed exploitation of resources (water, soil and forests) to the detriment of natural environments the world over. While only two urodeles are officially extinct, Hypselotriton wolterstorffi and Plethodon ainsworthi, the status of many other species is unknown or uncertain in South and Central America and South Asia, frightening examples of which are the Central and South American species of Pseudoeurycea, Thorius, Bolitoglossa and related genera, and is demonstrated by species that have not been found in more than thirty years such as Isthmura naucampatepetl, Pseudoeurycea ahuitzotl, P. mixcoalt, P. aquatica, B. digitigrada, and many others more. As far as Asia is concerned, many new species have been discovered in recent years, but we are only just beginning to understand the incredible diversity within groups such as Tylototriton, Pachytriton and Paramesotriton. Like elsewhere in the world, their population status is largely unknown and deserving of a full assessment (Hernandez 2015a, 2016a).
Project
Field surveys to assess the taxonomy, distribution, natural history and conservation of the Crocodile Newts, genera Tylototriton and Echinotriton in southeastern Asia