Pooja Viswanathan

Pooja Viswanathan
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai | MSSM · Department of Neuroscience

BS, MS, Dr. rer. nat.

About

11
Publications
2,220
Reads
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330
Citations
Citations since 2017
7 Research Items
272 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
20172018201920202021202220230102030405060
Introduction
Pooja Viswanathan is a Junior Fellow at the Simons Foundation Society of Fellows and currently works at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, NYC
Additional affiliations
June 2018 - March 2020
The Rockefeller University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2011 - May 2018
University of Tuebingen
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2007 - February 2010
National Brain Research Centre
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
"Sense of number" refers to the classical idea that we perceive the number of items (numerosity) intuitively. However, whether the brain signals numerosity spontaneously, in the absence of learning, remains unknown; therefore, we recorded from neurons in the ventral intraparietal sulcus and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of numerically naive mo...
Article
Prefrontal cortex (PFC) and posterior parietal cortex are key brain areas for magnitude representations. Whether active discrimination of numerosity changes neuronal representations is still not known. We simultaneously recorded from the same recording sites in the PFC and ventral intraparietal area (VIP) before and after monkeys learned to activel...
Article
Full-text available
The computational architecture that enables the flexible coupling between otherwise independent eye and hand effector systems is not understood. By using a drift diffusion framework, in which variability of the reaction time (RT) distribution scales with mean RT, we tested the ability of a common stochastic accumulator to explain eye-hand coordinat...
Article
What makes familiar faces so special? Explicit semantic information in the brain is generated by gradually stripping off the specific context in which the item is embedded. A particularly striking example of such explicit representations are face-specific neurons. Landi et al . report the properties of neurons in a small region of the monkey anteri...
Article
Full-text available
Our sense of number rests on the activity of neurons that are tuned to the number of items and show great invariance across display formats and modalities. Whether numerosity coding becomes abstracted from local spatial representations characteristic of visual input is not known. We mapped the visual receptive fields (RFs) of numerosity-selective n...
Article
Full-text available
Humans and animals have a “number sense,” an innate capability to intuitively assess the number of visual items in a set, its numerosity. This capability implies that mechanisms to extract numerosity indwell the brain’s visual system, which is primarily concerned with visual object recognition. Here, we show that network units tuned to abstract num...
Article
Full-text available
The concept of receptive field (RF) describes the responsiveness of neurons to sensory space. Neurons in the primate association cortices have long been known to be spatially selective but a detailed characterization and direct comparison of RFs between frontal and parietal association cortices is missing. We sampled the RFs of a large number of ne...
Article
Full-text available
The basic organization principles of the primary visual cortex (V1) are commonly assumed to also hold in the association cortex such that neurons within a cortical column share functional connectivity patterns and represent the same region of the visual field. We mapped the visual receptive fields (RFs) of neurons recorded at the same electrode in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Number sense, a spontaneous ability to process approximate numbers, has been documented in human adults, infants and newborns, and many other animals. Species as distant as monkeys and crows exhibit number-selective neuronal activity. How number sense can emerge in the absence of learning or fine tuning is currently unknown. We introduce a random m...
Article
Full-text available
Number sense, a spontaneous ability to process approximate numbers, has been documented in human adults, infants and newborns, and many other animals. Species as distant as monkeys and crows exhibit very similar neurons tuned to specific numerosities. How number sense can emerge in the absence of learning or fine tuning is currently unknown. We int...

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