Pontsho Moela

Pontsho Moela
University of Pretoria | UP · Department of Genetics

Ph.D. Biochemistry and Cell Biology

About

12
Publications
6,791
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66
Citations
Introduction
Research focus: targeting the expression of key biomarkers of cancer in breast and cervical cancer cells in combination with treatment using novel natural and synthetic compounds that were derived from native South African medicinal plants. Using the RNA interference technology, we have successfully silenced the RBBP6 gene with subsequent apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest in breast and cervical cancer cells. Current research includes in vitro and in vivo analysis of the mode of action of potential gene targets and anti-cancer screening of novel compounds.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Developments in genomics in the last decade has improved our understanding of the role of genetics in health and disease. One area where the impact of genomics is very noticeable is in oncology, specifically in terms of diagnosis and elucidating genetic predisposition to rare and common cancers. Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) stands to benefit from cance...
Article
Full-text available
Background: RBBP6 is one of the genes identified as a proliferative gene that plays a role in cancer development, On the other hand both RBBP6 and telomerase activity have been shown to be increase in various cancers. E6 protein of HPV and RBBP6 is known to enhance the progression of cancer cells by interacting with p53 and presenting it to be ubi...
Conference Paper
The incidence rate of breast cancer has increased beyond that of lung cancer, making it the most common malignancy among women. Breast tumor progression is partly because of p53 inactivation by overexpressed that possess p53 binding domain. RBBP6 forms a member of ubiquitous regulatory proteins because its RING finger-like domain has an E3 ligase a...
Conference Paper
The incidence rate of breast cancer has increased beyond that of lung cancer, making it the most common malignancy among women. Breast tumor progression is partly because of p53 inactivation by overexpressed that possess p53 binding domain. RBBP6 forms a member of ubiquitous regulatory proteins because its RING finger-like domain has an E3 ligase a...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Breast cancer is the most common malignancy amongst women and has a higher incidence rate than lung cancer. Its tumor progression partially results from inactivation of p53 which is caused by overexpression of ubiquitous regulatory proteins possessing p53-binding domain. RBBP6 is regarded as one of the ubiquitous proteins because of it...
Article
Breast cancer remains a female-related health problem on a global scale, accounting for over a million newly estimated cases that are still on the rise. More than 50% cases of breast tumorigenesis are due to mutations or inactivation of p53, a tumor suppressor gene involved in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis. In breast cancer, the freque...
Article
Breast cancer incidence rate has increased beyond that of lung cancer, making it the most common malignancy among women. Breast tumour progression is partly as a result of p53 inactivation by overexpressed ubiquitous regulatory proteins that possess p53 binding domain. RBBP6 forms a member of such protein since it has an E3 ligase activity due to i...
Article
Full-text available
Overexpression of RBBP6 in cancers of the colon, lung, and esophagus makes it a potential target in anticancer therapy. This is especially important because RBBP6 associates with the tumor suppressor gene p53, the inactivation of which has been linked to over 50% of all cancer types. However, the expression of RBBP6 in cancer and its interaction wi...
Article
Ubiquitin-like DWNN domain and RING finger-like domain presence on Retinoblastoma Binding protein 6 (RBBP6), is linked to its function as cancer promoting gene through p53 degradation via its p53-binding domain. RBBP6 bind and regulate the expression of p53 and pRB in the cell machinery implicates RBBP6 in cell proliferation during cancer developme...
Chapter
Full-text available
Breast cancer is the most common cancer type amongst women, accounting for most fe‐ male cancer deaths second to cervical cancer worldwide. It is, therefore, highly crucial to understand the molecular biology and explore other pathways involved in carcinogenesis in order to select appropriate treatment not only for breast cancer but for other cance...
Article
Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 6 (RBBP6) is a multi-domain protein that uses its ring finger domain to interact with p53 and pRb tumour suppressor genes. The mechanism by which RBBP6 uses to degrade p53 is still unknown; nonetheless it is well known that RBBP6 promotes cell proliferation in several cancers by negatively regulating p53 via its E3 ub...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
I will be using an 7 cm strip (pH 3-10) and my protein is extracted from MCF-7 (and other cancer cell lines). Bio-Rad's protocol recommends 169ug for a 7cm strip however I think this is loads; the highest amount I could get from BCA assay standards is 50 ug (2000ug/ml) so 169ug lies outside the range of the standards already. Has anyone done similar work with a lesser (<169ug) amount of protein? Without having to increase cell density or using a wider range of the BSA standards?
Question
I'm looking for scientific papers reporting on worldwide incidences of breast cancer, atleast for the past five years.
Question
I am trying to generate a five-data point standard curve from a 10X dilution series using an initial template cDNA of concentration 2100ng/ul. I use the Roche Light Cycler software 4.05 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell line-derived cDNA to construct a standard curve for the GAPDH gene. This is my 10th attempt and irrespective of my endless trials to vary each component of my RT-PCR cocktail, to maintain consistency throughout my experiments and to minimize contamination, I still get a non-straight standard curve with the first two data points forming a horizontal line before the slope can start to decrease. And with reference to the amplification curve, it looks like the two data points have got the same cross point, i.e. they start amplifying at the same time. I don't understand how this is possible because I did a serial dilution meaning the amount of cDNA in each RT-PCR mixture is not the same. I'm also very careful with my pipetting however I struggle to generate amplification curves that are equally spaced and sometimes my replicates scatter. Please help.

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