Polina Yu. Novikova

Polina Yu. Novikova
Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research | MPIPZ · Department of Chromosome Biology

PhD

About

30
Publications
10,162
Reads
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1,708
Citations
Citations since 2016
27 Research Items
1705 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
Introduction
Polina Yu. Novikova is leading a group at the Department of Chromosome Biology at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research studying the genetics of extreme adaptation in polyploids https://www.novikovalab.org/
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research
Position
  • Group Leader
September 2016 - August 2020
Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2011 - August 2016
Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology (GMI)
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
June 2011 - August 2016
September 2004 - May 2009
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Field of study
  • Biophysics

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Although complex interactions between hosts and microbial associates are increasingly well documented, we still know little about how and why hosts shape microbial communities in nature. In addition, host genetic effects on microbial communities vary widely depending on the environment, obscuring conclusions about which microbes are impacted and wh...
Preprint
In outcrossing plants a lack of mating partners at range edges or resulting from karyotypic changes can be alleviated by a transition to self-compatibility. Here we determine the genetics of this transition in diploid Siberian Arabidopsis lyrata and allotetraploid A. kamchatica . We first provide chromosome-level genome assemblies for one Siberian...
Article
Full-text available
Pinewood nematode (PWN, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) is the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD), which severely affects Pinus pinaster stands in southwestern Europe. Despite the high susceptibility of P. pinaster, individuals of selected half-sib families have shown genetic variability in survival after PWN inoculation, indicating that breeding...
Article
Full-text available
Most diploid organisms have polyploid ancestors. The evolutionary process of polyploidization is poorly understood but has frequently been conjectured to involve some form of ‘genome shock’, such as genome reorganization and subgenome expression dominance. Here we study polyploidization in Arabidopsis suecica , a post-glacial allopolyploid species...
Preprint
Full-text available
Whole-genome duplications yield varied chromosomal pairing patterns, ranging from strictly bivalent to multivalent, resulting in disomic and polysomic inheritance modes. In the bivalent case, homeologous chromosomes form pairs, where in a multivalent pattern all copies are homologous and are therefore free to pair and recombine. As sufficient seque...
Preprint
Full-text available
The majority of diploid organisms have polyploid ancestors. The evolutionary process of polyploidization (and subsequent re-diploidization) is poorly understood, but has frequently been conjectured to involve some form of "genome shock --- partly inspired by studies in crops, many of which are polyploid, and in which polyploidy has frequently been...
Article
Full-text available
Polyploidy has played an important role in evolution across the tree of life but it is still unclear how polyploid lineages may persist after their initial formation. While both common and well-studied in plants, polyploidy is rare in animals and generally less understood. The Australian burrowing frog genus Neobatrachus is comprised of six diploid...
Article
Independent or parallel evolution of similar traits is key to understanding the genetics and limitations of adaptation. Adaptation from the same genetic changes in different populations defines parallel evolution. Such genetic changes can derive from standing ancestral variation or de novo mutations and excludes instances of adaptive introgression....
Article
Full-text available
Chemical signaling in animals often plays a central role in eliciting a variety of responses during reproductive interactions between males and females. One of the best-known vertebrate courtship pheromone systems is Sodefrin Precursor-like Factors (SPFs), a family of two-domain three-finger proteins with a female-receptivity enhancing function, cu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Polyploidy has played an important role in evolution across the tree of life but it is still unclear how polyploid lineages may persist after their initial formation. While both common and well-studied in plants, polyploidy is rare in animals and generally less well-understood. The Australian burrowing frog genus Neobatrachus is comprised of six di...
Article
Full-text available
Crucihimalaya himalaica , a close relative of Arabidopsis and Capsella , grows on the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau (QTP) about 4,000 m above sea level and represents an attractive model system for studying speciation and ecological adaptation in extreme environments. We assembled a draft genome sequence of 234.72 Mb encoding 27,019 genes and investigated...
Article
Full-text available
Polyploidy may provide adaptive advantages and is considered to be important for evolution and speciation. Polyploidy events are found throughout the evolutionary history of plants, however they do not seem to be uniformly distributed along the time axis. For example, many of the detected ancient whole-genome duplications (WGDs) seem to cluster aro...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although the complex interactions between hosts and microbial associates are increasingly well documented, we still know little about how and why hosts shape microbial communities in nature. We characterized the leaf microbiota within 200 clonal accessions in eight field experiments and detected effects of both local environment and host genotype o...
Article
Full-text available
The considerable genome size variation in Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown largely to be due to copy number variation (CNV) in 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Surprisingly, attempts to map this variation by means of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) failed to identify either of the two likely sources, namely the nucleolar organizer regions...
Article
Full-text available
Recent work has shown that Arabidopsis thaliana contains genetic groups originating from different ice age refugia, with one particular group comprising over 95% of the current worldwide population. In Europe, relicts of other groups can be found in local populations along the Mediterranean Sea. Here we provide evidence that these ‘relicts’ occupie...
Article
Full-text available
Polyploidy is an example of instantaneous speciation when it involves the formation of a new cytotype that is incompatible with the parental species. Because new polyploid individuals are likely to be rare, establishment of a new species is unlikely unless polyploids are able to reproduce through self-fertilization (selfing), or asexually. Converse...
Preprint
Full-text available
The considerable genome size variation in Arabidopsis thaliana has been shown largely to be due to copy number variation (CNV) in 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Surprisingly, attempts to map this variation by means of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) failed to identify either of the two likely sources, namely the nucleolar organizer regions...
Article
Full-text available
The notion of species as reproductively isolated units related through a bifurcating tree implies that gene trees should generally agree with the species tree and that sister taxa should not share polymorphisms unless they diverged recently and should be equally closely related to outgroups. It is now possible to evaluate this model systematically....
Article
The epigenome orchestrates genome accessibility, functionality, and three-dimensional structure. Because epigenetic variation can impact transcription and thus phenotypes, it may contribute to adaptation. Here, we report 1,107 high-quality single-base resolution methylomes and 1,203 transcriptomes from the 1001 Genomes collection of Arabidopsis tha...
Article
Arabidopsis thaliana serves as a model organism for the study of fundamental physiological, cellular, and molecular processes. It has also greatly advanced our understanding of intraspecific genome variation. We present a detailed map of variation in 1,135 high-quality re-sequenced natural inbred lines representing the native Eurasian and North Afr...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptation of a complex trait often requires the accumulation of many modifications to finely tune its underpinning molecular components to novel environmental requirements. The investigation of cis-acting regulatory modifications can be used to pinpoint molecular systems partaking in such complex adaptations. Here, we identify cis-acting modificat...
Article
Full-text available
Reciprocal crosses between species often display an asymmetry in the fitness of F1 hybrids. This pattern, referred to as isolation asymmetry or Darwin's corollary to Haldane's rule, is a general feature of reproductive isolation in plants, yet factors determining its magnitude and direction remain unclear. We evaluated reciprocal species crosses be...
Article
Full-text available
The mutual arrangement of a phospholipid molecule containing a peroxyl radical and a molecule of membrane-acting antioxidant α-tocopherol (vitamin E) in the lipid bilayer has been studied by molecular dynamics simulation. The geometry of molecules in the membrane is revealed at which the hydrogen atom can be transferred from the exocyclic hydroxyl...
Conference Paper
Understanding the genetic basis of local adaptation has been a long-standing goal of evolutionary genetics. While extensive genomic resources are available in Arabidopsis, field experiments are key to identify variants underlying natural variation and investigate their adaptive value. Here we present results from two sets of complementary experimen...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Polyploidy plays important role in evolution, providing a ‘backup’ genetic material and increasing genetic novelty. However, polyploids have to adapt their cellular machinery to the whole genome duplication (WGD) itself. In the autotetraploids, crossovers may occur randomly between each copy during meiosis, compromising regular chromosomal segregation. Adapted to WGDs autopolyploid plants allow only one crossover per chromosome, which leads to successful meiosis. Although recent WGDs have been described in animals, they occur rarely and usually such animals reproduce asexually. Amphibia is the only exception among bisexually reproducing vertebrates with multiple independent occurrences of WGDs, for example, frog genus Neobatrachus consists of 6 diploid and 4 tetraploid species. This project aims to provide the first description of adaptation mechanism to autotetraploidy in animal kingdom using Neobatrachus frogs. Assembling the genome of Neobatrachus pictus we will provide the third assembled genome for Anura clade. Assessing genetic variation for diploid and tetraploid Neobatrachus species we hope to identify potentially selected regions and adaptive changes in tetraploids compared to diploids. Integration of the findings in Neobatrachus and plants will shed light on whether the mechanism of adaptation to the WGDs is universal or plants and animals use alternative ways.