Polina Geva

Polina Geva
Boston University | BU · Department of Physiology and Biophysics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
681
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44
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Introduction
Polina Geva currently works at the Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University. Polina does research in Cell Biology, Cancer Research and Biotechnology. Their current project is bicarbonate modulation of photoreceptors

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Intracellular mRNA transport contributes to the spatio-temporal regulation of mRNA function and localized translation. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, asymmetric mRNA transport localizes~30 specific mRNAs including those encoding polarity and secretion factors, to the bud tip. The underlying process involves RNA-binding proteins (RB...
Preprint
Full-text available
Intracellular mRNA transport contributes to the spatio-temporal regulation of mRNA function and localized translation. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae , asymmetric mRNA transport localizes ∼30 specific mRNAs including those encoding polarity and secretion factors, to the bud tip. The underlying process involves RNA binding proteins (...
Article
Full-text available
The membrane guanylate cyclase, ROS-GC, that synthesizes cyclic GMP for use as a second messenger for visual transduction in retinal rods and cones, is stimulated by bicarbonate. Bicarbonate acts directly on ROS-GC1, because it enhanced the enzymatic activity of a purified, recombinant fragment of bovine ROS-GC1 consisting solely of the core cataly...
Article
Full-text available
MicroRNAs (miRs) are short non-coding regulatory RNAs that control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in cancer development and progression, acting either as oncogenes or as tumor suppressors. Identification of aberrantly expressed miRs in patients with hematological malignancies as compared to healthy indi...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental pollution with heavy metals is a very serious ecological problem, which can be solved by bioremediation of metal ions by microorganisms. Yeast cells, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are known to exhibit a good natural ability to remove heavy metal ions from an aqueous phase. In the present work, an attempt was made to increase th...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Identification biological markers for early diagnostic for hematological malignancies.