Polaris Koi

Polaris Koi
University of Turku | UTU · Division of Philosophy

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
664
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11
Citations
Introduction
I am a philosopher working on agency, responsibility, behavioral selection & guidance, and psychiatry. My method includes rich engagement with empirical findings in the behavioral and brain sciences. Currently employed as Senior Researcher in the Academy of Finland Nudging for Climate research consortium, see www.climatenudge.fi My website is at www.polariskoi.com

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Realists about mental disorder have been hasty about dismissing social explanations of how mental disorder is constituted. However, many social ontologies are realist ontologies. In order to create a meaningful distinction between realism and social metaphysics about mental disorder, I propose that realism about mental disorder is best understood a...
Article
Full-text available
Self-control is that which is enacted to align our behaviour with intentions, motives, or better judgment in the face of conflicting impulses of motives. In this paper, I ask, what explains interpersonal differences in self-control? After defending a functionalist conception of self-control, I argue that differences in self-control are analogous to...
Article
Full-text available
While nudging has garnered plenty of interdisciplinary attention, the ethics of applying it to climate policy has been little discussed. However, not all ethical considerations surrounding nudging are straightforward to apply to climate nudges. In this article, we overview the state of the debate on the ethics of nudging and highlight themes that a...
Article
Full-text available
How we ought to diagnose, categorise and respond to spectrum disabilities such as autism and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a topic of lively debate. The heterogeneity associated with ADHD and autism is described as falling on various continua of behavioural, neural, and genetic difference. These continua are varyingly described...
Article
Full-text available
Debates concerning whether Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) mitigates responsibility often involve recourse to its genetic and neurodevelopmental etiology. For such arguments, individuals with ADHD have diminished self-control, and hence do not fully satisfy the control condition for responsibility, when there is a genetic or neurode...
Chapter
A book chapter about artificial intelligence and human enhancement.
Article
Published in Niin & Näin (Finnish Philosophy magazine)
Article
Full-text available
Ethicists have for the past 20 years debated the possibility of using neurointerventions to improve intelligence and even moral capacities, and thereby create a safer society. Contributing to a recent debate concerning neurointerventions in criminal rehabilitation, Nicole Vincent and Elizabeth Shaw have separately discussed the possibility of respo...
Chapter
A fun popular article on Orwell, and on whether human enhancement could help thwart totalitarianism.
Chapter
A chapter about feasibility in political theory

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Quantitative Genetics is the branch of genetics concerned with complex phenotypic traits as height, intelligence, mental disorders, and skin color. The field was born in the early decades of the twentieth century thanks to the work of scholars including Ronald Fisher, Sewall Wright, and John Haldane, who had drawn on previous theoretical models and methods developed by biometricians, such as Francis Galton, Karl Pearson, Walter Weldon, and George Yule, and Mendelian geneticists, such as William Bateson, Hugo de Vries, and Reginal Punnett. Although quantitative genetics has been both influential and controversial, its conceptual and disciplinary history has received surprisingly little systematic attention from historians and philosophers of science, with the result that major questions about its history—and its legacies—have remained unaddressed. Recent works in the history and philosophy of science are leading the scientific community to a questioning of received views on a range of topics related to the conceptual, methodological, and disciplinary sources and identities of quantitative genetics. Especially pressing is the need for a more comprehensive perspective on the longstanding and apparently unbridgeable divide between quantitative genetics and developmental biology: While the first is widely understood as a science about statistical properties of biological populations, the second takes into account how individual organisms are produced by the interaction between their genotype and the environment over time. This connects to the question of whether theoretical assumptions and methods from early quantitative genetics are tenable in the context of contemporary epigenetics and systems biology. This Special Issue aims to fill this gap in scholarship by connecting historical and contemporary perspectives on quantitative genetics. First, by standing back from present-day debates and difficulties, the Issue will uncover the historical roots and conceptual underpinnings of quantitative genetics. Second, by analyzing the connection between quantitative genetics and other branches of biology, the Issue will assess the legacy of quantitative genetics in contemporary science. Guest Editors: - Davide Serpico, Department of Classics, Philosophy and History, University of Genoa - Kate E. Lynch, Charles Perkins Centre, Department of Philosophy, University of Sydney - Theodore M. Porter, Department of History, UCLA
Archived project
Junior Investigator project for the Genetics & Human Agency Research Project