Ping Wen

Ping Wen
Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden · CAS Key Laboratory of Tropical Forestry Ecology

PhD

About

25
Publications
10,467
Reads
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350
Citations
Citations since 2016
22 Research Items
345 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Introduction
Ping Wen currently works at Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden. Ping does research in chemical ecology. Their current project is 'Honeybee and wasp communication'.
Additional affiliations
February 2015 - August 2019
Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
March 2013 - January 2015
Zhejiang University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2006 - June 2012
Nanjing Forestry University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Rates of seed dispersal have rarely been considered important. Here, we demonstrate through field observations and experiments that rapid dispersal is essential for the unusually short-lived seeds of Aquilaria sinensis (agarwood; Thymelaeaceae), which desiccate and die within hours of exposure by fruit dehiscence in the hot, dry forest canopy in tr...
Article
Full-text available
A subspecies of the Asian hornet Vespa velutina, V. velutina nigrithorax (Vvn), is native to coastal China but has invaded several other parts of the world. It is a major pest in both its native and invasive ranges. The subspecies V. velutina auraria (Vva) is native to inland China, where it causes harm to local apiculture industries by preying o...
Article
Full-text available
Chemoreceptive sensilla are abundantly distributed on antennal lamellae of scarab beetles. Olfactory reception by these sensory lamellae plays a major role in feeding behaviors and sexual communication of these beetles. A new electroantennogram (EAG) recording technique is here described for evaluation of electrophysiological responses of antennal...
Article
Full-text available
The volatile trail pheromone is an ephemeral chemical cue, whereas the geomagnetic field (GMF) provides a stable positional reference. However, it is unclear whether and how the cryptic termites perceive the GMF for orientation in light or darkness until now. Here, we found that the two termite species, Reticulitermes chinensis and Odontotermes for...
Article
Full-text available
Many insects metamorphose from antagonistic larvae into mutualistic adult pollinators, with reciprocal adaptation leading to specialized insect–plant associations. It remains unknown how such interactions are established at molecular level. Here we assemble high-quality genomes of a fig species, Ficus pumila var. pumila, and its specific pollinatin...
Article
Banyan trees are distinguished by their extraordinary aerial roots. The Ficus genus includes species that have evolved a species-specific mutualism system with wasp pollinators. We sequenced genomes of the Chinese banyan tree, F. microcarpa, and a species lacking aerial roots, F. hispida, and one wasp genome coevolving with F. microcarpa, Eupristin...
Article
Full-text available
Trail-following behavior is a key to ecological success of termites, allowing them to orient themselves between the nesting and foraging sites. This behavior is controlled by specific trail-following pheromones produced by the abdominal sternal gland occurring in all termite species and developmental stages. Trail-following communication has been s...
Article
Due to its huge invasion potential and specialization in honeybee predation, the invasive hornet Vespa velutina nigrithorax represents a high-concern species under both an ecological and economical perspective. In light of the development of specific odorant attractants to be used in sustainable control strategies, we carried out both behavioural a...
Article
Eavesdropping is predicted to evolve between sympatric, but not allopatric, predator and prey. The evolutionary arms race between Asian honey bees and their hornet predators has led to a remarkable defence, heat balling, which suffocates hornets with heat and carbon dioxide. We show that the sym-patric Asian species, Apis cerana (Ac), formed heat b...
Article
Full-text available
Termites are eusocial insects currently classified into nine families, of which only Stylotermitidae has never been subjected to any molecular phylogenetic analysis. Stylotermitids present remarkable morphology and have the unique habit of feeding on living trees. We sequenced mitogenomes of five stylotermitid samples from China and Taiwan to recon...
Article
Full-text available
The nectar of the thunder god vine, Tripterygium hypoglaucum, contains a terpenoid, triptolide (TRP), that may be toxic to the sympatric Asian honey bee, Apis cerana, because honey produced from this nectar is toxic to bees. However, these bees will forage on, recruit for, and pollinate this plant during a seasonal dearth of preferred food sources....
Article
Full-text available
The Asian hornet, Vespa velutina, is an invasive, globally-distributed predator of European honey bees and other insects. To better under its reproductive biology and to find a specific, effective, and low-impact control method for this species, we identified and tested the key compounds in V. velutina sex pheromone. Virgin gynes (reproductive fema...
Article
Full-text available
Vespicochory, seed dispersal by hornets, is an uncommon seed dispersal pattern in angiosperms. To date, this phenomenon has been recorded in only four families. Because of its rarity, the causes and consequences of vespicochory remain unclear. Hence, this seed dispersal syndrome is often regarded as anecdotal. Through field investigations, chemical...
Article
Full-text available
While foraging, animals can form inter- and intraspecific social signalling networks to avoid similar predators. We report here that foragers of different native Asian honey bee species can detect and use a specialized alarm pheromone component, benzyl acetate (BA), to avoid danger. We analysed the volatile alarm pheromone produced by attacked work...
Article
Full-text available
Predators may eavesdrop on their prey using innate signals of varying nature. In regards to social prey, most of the prey signals are derived from social communication and may therefore be highly complex. The most efficient predators select signals that provide the highest benefits. Here, we showed the use of eusocial prey signals by the termite-ra...
Article
In highly social bees, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) is vital for colony life. Both Apis cerana (Ac) and Apis mellifera (Am) share an evolutionarily conserved set of QMP compounds: (E)-9-oxodec-2-enoic acid (9-ODA), (E)-9-hydroxydec-2-enoic acid (9-HDA), (E)-10-hydroxy-dec-2-enoic acid (10-HDA), 10-hydroxy-decanoic acid (10-HDAA), and methyl p–h...
Article
In colonial organisms, alarm pheromones can provide a key fitness advantage by enhancing colony defense and warning of danger. Learning which species use alarm pheromone and the key compounds involved therefore enhances our understanding of how this important signal has evolved. However, our knowledge of alarm pheromones is more limited in the soci...
Article
Pollinators such as bees provide a critical ecosystem service that can be impaired by information about predation. We provide the first evidence for olfactory eavesdropping and avoidance of heterospecific alarm signals, alarm pheromones, at food sources in bees. We predicted that foragers could eavesdrop upon heterospecific alarm pheromones, and wo...
Article
Full-text available
In Southeast Asia the native honey bee species Apis cerana is often attacked by hornets (Vespa velutina), mainly in the period from April to November. During the co-evolution of these two species honey bees have developed several strategies to defend themselves such as learning the odors of hornets and releasing alarm components to inform other mat...
Article
Full-text available
The eusocial termites are well accomplished in chemical communication, but how they achieve the communication using trace amount of no more than two pheromone components is mostly unknown. In this study, the foraging process and trail pheromones of the fungus-growing termite Odontotermes formosanus (Shiraki) were systematically studied and monitore...
Article
The sex-pairing pheromone of the black winged subterranean termite, Odontotermes formosanus (Shiraki) (Isoptera, Termitidae), was investigated using headspace-SPME, GC-MS, GC-EAD, and attraction bioassays. Females secrete the pheromone from their sternal gland to attract males. The sex-pairing pheromone is composed of (Z,Z)-dodeca-3,6-dien-1-ol and...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The responses to climate change were often considered to be physiological based on phenology. But it is not known if and how important it is based on ethology. By connecting behavioral physiology, behavioural ecology and climate change, the goals of this project are to answer: 1) How ecological important insect species respond to climate change behaviorally? 2) In detail, how the communication in behaviour respond to weather conditions? 3)How the animal-plant interaction respond instantly to climate change?
Project
Termites are one of the main invertebrate decomposer organisms in tropical regions which is undoubtedly due to their association with both internal (endo-) and external (ecto-)symbiotic microorganisms. The microbial symbionts allow termites to break down the complex ligno-cellulose matrix of plant tissues and soil organic matter which enable termites to feed on nutrient poor but highly available organic matter. While the relationship between termites and endosymbionts has been widely studied, the understanding of the role of ectosymbionts is poor. We hypothesise that the latter may play a vital role in the successful development of termite functional groups and we aim to examine the relationships between termites, endosymbionts, ectosymbionts, and their food sources, which together with historical biogeography may explain the inconsistent intercontinental patterns of termite abundance. Mass sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA and fungal ITS genes will be used followed by analyses of co-occurrence patterns to investigate the relationships between termites and their allied microorganisms. Our aim is to understand the inconsistent global termite abundance patterns by studying the relationships between termites and their internal and external symbiotic microorganisms. Mass sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA and fungal ITS genes will be used followed by analyses of co-occurrence patterns.
Project
Investigate the diversity of pheromonal compounds in this group.