Pierre-Olivier Antoine

Pierre-Olivier Antoine
Université de Montpellier | UM1 · Institut des Sciences de l’Évolution Montpellier (ISEM)

Ph.D.
distinguished professor (paleontology)

About

320
Publications
119,146
Reads
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4,950
Citations
Introduction
As for an introduction, have a look at my community, skills, works, and projects... and if you have any requests, email me!
Additional affiliations
September 2010 - present
Université de Montpellier
Position
  • Professor (Full)
September 2003 - August 2010
Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
October 1997 - July 2000
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (320)
Article
We provide a synopsis of ~60 million years of life history in Neotropical lowlands, based on a comprehensive survey of the Cenozoic deposits along the Quebra da Cachiyacu near Contamana in Peruvian Amazonia. The 34 fossil-bearing localities identified have yielded a diversity of fossil remains, including vertebrates, mollusks, arthropods, plant fos...
Article
Full-text available
A state-of-the-art review of the Cenozoic fossil record from Western Amazonia is provided, based on literature and new data (regarding Paleogene native ungulates). It allows summarizing the evolution and dynamics of middle Eocene–Holocene mammalian guilds, at the level of species, families, and orders. Major gaps in the Western Amazonian mammal rec...
Article
The long-term isolation of South America during most of the Cenozoic produced a highly peculiar terrestrial vertebrate biota, with a wide array of mammal groups, among which caviomorph rodents and platyrrhine primates are Mid-Cenozoic immigrants. In the absence of indisputable pre-Oligocene South American rodents or primates, the mode, timing and b...
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Preservation of fossil vertebrates in volcanic rocks is extremely rare. An articulated skull (cranium and mandible) of a rhinoceros was found in a 9.2±0.1 Ma-old ignimbrite of Cappadocia, Central Turkey. The unusual aspect of the preserved hard tissues of the skull (rough bone surface and brittle dentine) allows suspecting a peri-mortem exposure to...
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Full-text available
Amazonia contains one of the world's richest biotas, but origins of this diversity remain obscure. Onset of the Amazon River drainage at approximately 10.5 Ma represented a major shift in Neotropical ecosystems, and proto-Amazonian biotas just prior to this pivotal episode are integral to understanding origins of Amazonian biodiversity, yet vertebr...
Article
The late Miocene is a period of increasing aridity and habitat openness in the south-eastern Mediterranean region. The impact of these changes has not been fully explored regarding rhinocerotids’ ecology, although rhinoceroses were a major and diverse component of the Miocene mammalian faunas. Here, we investigate the palaeoecology of rhinocerotid...
Article
In recent years, the evolutionary history of rhinoceroses has been extensively developed and clarified, notably with the help of morpho-anatomical and molecular-based phylogenetic analyses. Within Rhinocerotidae, the genus Coelodonta Bronn, 1831, is one of the most representative icons of the Ice Ages, ranging from the Late Pliocene to the latest P...
Preprint
Hippo-like rhinocerotids, or teleoceratines, were a conspicuous component of Holarctic Miocene mammalian faunas, but their phylogenetic relationships are widely under-investigated. Excavations in lower Miocene deposits of the Olkhon Island (Tagay locality, Eastern Siberia; 16-18 Ma) have opened a unique window on the poorly-known early history of t...
Article
Currently, marsupials (modern members of the Metatheria clade) are widely distributed in tropical and subtropical areas of South America, but poorly represented in the fossil record of these regions. Except for the species-rich fossiliferous localities of La Venta in Colombia, additional Miocene metatherians from tropical, equatorial South America...
Article
New remains of a relatively plesiomorphic nothrotheriid sloth have been recovered from upper Miocene- aged deposits near the village of Achiri in the Altiplano of Bolivia. The new specimens appear allied to other middle and late Miocene remains from Argentina and Bolivia that have been assigned to the pseudo-genus ‘Xyophorus’. ‘Xyophorus’ has not p...
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Full-text available
The Pleistocene presence of the genus Homo in continental Southeast Asia is primarily evidenced by a sparse stone tool record and rare human remains. Here we report a Middle Pleistocene hominin specimen from Laos, with the discovery of a molar from the Tam Ngu Hao 2 (Cobra Cave) limestone cave in the Annamite Mountains. The age of the fossil-bearin...
Preprint
Full-text available
Major climatic and ecological changes are documented in terrestrial ecosystems during the Miocene epoch. The Rhinocerotidae are a very interesting clade to investigate the impact of these changes on ecology, as they are abundant and diverse in the fossil record throughout the Miocene. Here, we explored the spatio-temporal evolution of rhinocerotids...
Article
We report systematic conclusions based on critical analyses of previous taxon diagnoses and systematic revisions of the Early-Middle Pleistocene mesotheriine notoungulate Mesotherium cristatum Serres 1867, from Buenos Aires province, Argentina. Mesotherium cristatum is a key taxon, as it is the guide species of the Ensenadan Age (Early-Middle Pleis...
Article
Rhinoceroses are among the most endangered mammalian species today. Their past diversity is well documented from the Eocene onward, although their evolutionary history is far from being fully understood. Here, we elucidate the systematic affinities of a Pleistocene rhinoceros species represented by a partial skeleton from 709±68 kya archaeological...
Article
Tam Pà Ling, a cave site in northeastern Laos, has yielded the earliest skeletal evidence of Homo sapiens in mainland Southeast Asia. The reliance of Pleistocene humans in rainforest settings on plant or animal resources is still largely unstudied, mainly due to poor collagen preservation in fossils from tropical environments precluding stable nitr...
Article
Pliocene and earliest Pleistocene Northern Eurasian rhinocerotines are poorly documented and understudied in comparison to Pleistocene and Miocene ones. However, they represent a key-group of species for understanding the phylogeny and historical biogeography of their Pleistocene relatives. In the present paper, we revise the abundant material from...
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The "phosphatières du Quercy" are karstic fillings exploited for phosphate at the end of the 19th century. They yield countless continental fossils through some 30 million years, ranging from late early Eocene to early Miocene. This exceptional paleontological series documents the 'Grande Coupure', a major biogeographical event involving a profound...
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Miocene deposits of South America have yielded several species-rich assemblages of caviomorph rodents. They are mostly situated at high and mid- latitudes of the continent, except for the exceptional Honda Group of La Venta, Colombia, the faunal composition of which allowed to describe the late middle Miocene Laventan South American Land Mammal Age...
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The capability of Pleistocene hominins to successfully adapt to different types of tropical forested environments has long been debated. In order to investigate environmental changes in Southeast Asia during a critical period for the turnover of hominin species, we analysed palaeoenvironmental proxies from five late Middle to Late Pleistocene fauna...
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Only five species of the once-diverse Rhinocerotidae remain, making the reconstruction of their evolutionary history a challenge to biologists since Darwin. We sequenced genomes from five rhinoceros species (three extinct and two living), which we compared to existing data from the remaining three living species and a range of outgroups. We identif...
Article
The West Indies are a natural laboratory for the study of biogeography and evolution, especially for mammals. The modality of their arrival in the Caribbean islands is a highly controversial issue, and palaeontological evidence remains particularly elusive. Lower Oligocene deposits of Puerto Rico (c. 29.5 Ma) have recently yielded the oldest archip...
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Ronzotherium is one of the earliest Rhinocerotidae in Europe, which first appeared just after the Eocene/Oligocene transition (Grande Coupure), and became extinct at the end of the Oligocene. It is a large-sized rhinocerotid, with a special position in the phylogeny of this group, as being one of the earliest-branching true Rhinocerotidae. However,...
Article
The Paleogene record of caviomorph rodents has substantially increased over the last decades, and their evolutionary history better understood by the discovery of their earliest representatives, so far recorded in several pre-Deseadan localities in Peruvian Amazonia. We report here the discovery of new caviomorph fossils from the Balsayacu area in...
Article
Since 2012, we have investigated a stratigraphic section encompassing the late Eocene–earliest Oligocene interval at Shapaja (Tarapoto area, Peruvian Amazonia, ca. 7°S), through paleontological and geological fieldwork. The measured sedimentary series (120 m-thick [West] plus 90 m-thick [East]), assigned to the upper member of the Pozo Formation, r...
Article
Our study aims to reconstruct the palaeogeography of the northern part of the Lesser Antilles in order to analyse whether emerged areas might have existed during the Cenozoic, favouring terrestrial faunal dispersals between South America and the Greater Antilles along the present-day Lesser Antilles arc. The stratigraphy and depositional environmen...
Article
Several studies have reported Miocene shallow-marine incursions in the Pebas Megawetland system (Western Amazonia) based on paleontological and sedimentological evidence. Only a few publications restricted to Middle and Late Miocene fossils outcropping in the Iquitos (Peru), Benjamin Constant and Eirunepé (Brazil) areas have provided isotopic evide...
Article
The mining district of Nefza-Sejnane (Tunisia) encloses numerous ores and raw material deposits, all formed in relation with successive Fe-rich fluids of meteoric and/or hydrothermal origins. Here, for the first time in Tunisia, (U-Th)/He ages were obtained on supergene goethite from various localities/deposits of the district highlight direct dati...
Preprint
Full-text available
The origin of the outstanding Neotropical biodiversity is still debated. A comprehensive understanding is hindered by the lack of deep-time comparative data across wide phylogenetic and ecological contexts. Here we define and evaluate four evolutionary scenarios assuming different diversity trajectories and drivers of Neotropical diversification. R...
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Full-text available
Extinct terrestrial sloths are common elements of the late Cenozoic South American fossil record. Among them, Mylodontinae species were particularly abundant in the Americas throughout the Pleistocene epoch, and their anatomy is relatively well known. In contrast, less information is available from the Neogene record and particularly from localitie...
Article
A multidisciplinary team is jointly investigating mammal evolution and subduction dynamics to unravel how flightless land mammals migrated to the Greater Antilles and other Caribbean islands.
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Intriguing latest Eocene land-faunal dispersals between South America and the Greater Antilles (northern Caribbean) has inspired the hypothesis of the GAARlandia (Greater Antil-les Aves Ridge) land bridge. This landbridge, however, should have crossed the Caribbean oceanic plate, and the geological evolution of its rise and demise, or its geodynami...
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Closed-canopy rainforests are important for climate (influencing atmospheric circulation, albedo, carbon storage, etc.) and ecology (harboring the highest biodiversity of continental regions). Of all rainforests, Amazonia is the world's most diverse, including the highest mammalian species richness. However, little is known about niche structure, e...
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Full-text available
This contribution contains the 3D models of the fossil teeth of two chinchilloid caviomorph rodents (Borikenomys praecursor and Chinchilloidea gen. et sp. indet.) discovered from lower Oligocene deposits of Puerto Rico, San Sebastian Formation (locality LACM Loc. 8060). These fossils were described and figured in the following publication: Marivaux...
Article
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Reduction of the anterior dentition (i.e. incisors and canines) is a major adaptative trait of the Rhinocerotidae among Perissodactyla. However, the corresponding evolutionary sequence was lacking a robust phylogenetic frame to support it thus far. Here, we describe a new Oligocene species of Rhinocerotinae, Mesaceratherium sp. nov. from the Swiss...
Article
The Coc Muoi fauna provides a good example of the type of tropical mammalian communities that existed in northern Vietnam during the late Middle Pleistocene. The first results of the analysis of hypoplasia indicated that rhinoceroses and wild cattle were exposed to multiple physiological and psychological stress events specific to age [Bacon et al....
Article
Mortality curves are a valuable tool to study taphonomy and to infer population structure in ancient communities; however, they rely on the precise determination of ontogenetic ages of individual animals, which is often uncertain for fragmentary and isolated fossil remains. In this paper, we develop a new protocol to construct mortality curves for...
Article
The Honda Group of La Venta, Colombia, has yielded a wide array of crown platyrrhine primates, documenting the late Middle Miocene epoch (ca. 12-13 Ma, Laventan SALMA). Although exceptional, this record represents only a snapshot of the evolutionary history of New World monkeys since none of the primate taxa recorded at La Venta had so far been fou...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The Neotropics currently host outstanding levels of species richness, with one‐third of the global tetrapod species. The underlying causes of these extraordinary levels of biodiversity are a topic debated in evolutionary ecology, but the main processes at work remain elusive. Location Neotropics. Time period Cenozoic and Mesozoic. Major taxa...
Article
This work describes an unparalleled sample of isolated fossil auditory ossicles of cainotheriid artiodactyls from the Paleogene karstic infillings of Dams (Tarn-et-Garonne, Quercy, France). This collection comprises a total of 18 mallei, 28 incudes and three stapedes. It allows the documentation of both intra- and interspecific variability of ossic...
Article
Arbre phylogénétique simplifié des mammifères, illustrant les relations de parenté des mammifères néotropicaux actuels et fossiles et paru dans la Revue Espèces. Illustrations de Mazan.
Article
Introduction au Dossier "Néotropiques" dédié à l'histoire des mammifères néotropicaux, et paru dans la revue ESpèces (n°35) en mars-mai 2020. Splendides illustrations de Mazan.
Article
Dans les Néotropiques comme ailleurs, la biodiversité actuelle résulte d’un équilibre entre apparition et disparition d’espèces au cours du temps (balance spéciation/extinction). Cette biodiversité témoigne aussi des phases successives d’immigration de nouvelles espèces depuis les régions adjacentes ou des zones plus éloignées, sous l’effet de phén...
Article
Après les dinosaures géants du Mésozoïque, les Néotropiques ont hébergé des espèces de très grande taille : une impressionnante mégafaune* brassant poissons, serpents, tortues, crocodiles, oiseaux et mammifères, tout au long du Cénozoïque. Cette profusion de formes gigantesques est d’autant plus inattendue que les faunes néotropicales actuelles en...
Article
Tapirs, loutres géantes, guanacos, aïs, opossums, jaguar, singes-araignées ou capybaras… Autant de mammifères emblématiques des Néotropiques, dont la liste serait sans fin tant la diversité mammalienne est ébouriffante dans la région. Pourtant, à eux seuls, ces huit animaux attestent d’une histoire évolutive extrêmement complexe, un véritable feuil...
Article
La paléontologie : Entre La Machine à remonter le temps et Retour vers le futur Loin d’être une discipline poussiéreuse (si ce n’est dans sa pratique de terrain), la paléontologie a profité de nombreux développements technologiques intervenus dans les dernières décennies...
Cover Page
The issue is mostly devoted to Neotropical mammals, with original drawings by Mazan and a bunch of nice articles (interchanges, evolution, megafauna, and Caribbean mammals), original illustrations, fantastic drawings by Mazan, and photographs (notably by Antoine Baglan, Quentin Martinez, and Nathan Upham)!