Pierre-Luc Chagnon

Pierre-Luc Chagnon
Université de Sherbrooke | UdeS · Department of Biology

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22
Publications
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867
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Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
AimsWe explored how long-term agricultural practices affect arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal traits and community structure.Methods We sampled soil and roots from a 26-year-old field experiment comprising 16 replicated treatments, in which we manipulated tillage intensity (moldboard vs. chisel plow), fertilization (organic vs. mineral) and crop r...
Article
Full-text available
Biotic specialization holds information about the assembly, evolution, and stability of biological communities. Partner availabilities can play an important role in enabling species interactions, where uneven partner availabilities can bias estimates of biotic specialization when using phylogenetic diversity indices. It is therefore important to ac...
Article
The enemy release hypothesis is frequently invoked to explain invasion by non-native species, but studies focusing on the influence of enemies on natural plant range expansion due to climate change remain scarce. We combined multiple approaches to study the influence of plant-enemy interactions on the upper elevational range limit of sugar maple (A...
Article
Networks tools are being increasingly used in the study of plant-fungus interactions and likely to provide new insights in the way plant-fungus interactions are structured. At the same time, they raise new questions and challenges. Here, I highlight the most important problems and outline how network tools can be effectively used in mycorrhizal eco...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the factors that shape community assembly remains one of the most enduring and important questions in modern ecology. Network theory can reveal rules of community assembly within and across study systems and suggest novel hypotheses regarding the formation and stability of communities. However, such studies generally face the challeng...
Article
Plants and their microbial symbionts are often found to interact non-randomly in nature, but we have yet to understand the mechanisms responsible for such preferential species associations. Theory predicts that host plants should select symbiotic partners bearing traits complementary to their own, as this should favor cooperation and evolutionary s...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular tools have progressively replaced morphological approaches to characterize microbial communities in nature. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are no exception to this rule. Yet, one challenge posed by these symbionts is that they colonize simultaneously both plant roots and soil, which complicates their detection and quantification. In mo...
Article
Plants are routinely colonized by both beneficial and detrimental microorganisms. These two microbial guilds may indirectly interact with each other via their host, either by modifying its vigor, or by altering its hormonal/defense status. Here, we studied indirect interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and three plant pathogens. We...
Article
Data generated from next generation sequencing (NGS) will soon comprise the majority of information about arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities. Although these approaches give deeper insight, analysing NGS data involves decisions that can significantly affect results and conclusions. This is particularly true for AMF community studies, be...
Article
Next-generation sequencing technologies are providing us with new opportunities to characterize plant–fungal communities in more depth and with better replication than ever before. The application of network concepts and numerical tools to analyze those extensive data sets is also rapidly increasing. Here we show, however, that network-based tools...
Article
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are widespread plant symbionts that extensively colonize both soil and roots. Given their influence on ecosystem processes, such as plant growth, soil carbon storage, and nutrient cycling, there is great interest in understanding the drivers of their community structure. AM fungal communities are increasingly chara...
Article
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are important plant symbionts widespread worldwide. Like other fungi, they have the ability to perform hyphal anastomosis, that is, the fusion of encountering vegetative hyphae. Research in other fungal phyla has evidenced numerous potential functional and evolutionary consequences of anastomosis. Yet, in AM fungal...
Article
A majority of plant species has roots that are colonized by both arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and non-mycorrhizal (NM) fungi. The latter group may include plant mutualists, commensals, parasites and pathogens. The co-occurrence of these two broad groups may translate into competition for root volume as well as for plant-derived carbon (C). Here we p...
Article
Despite the growing appreciation for the functional diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, our understanding of the causes and consequences of this diversity is still poor. In this opinion article, we review published data on AM fungal functional traits and attempt to identify major axes of life history variation. We propose that a life hi...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ubiquitous soil fungi that live symbiotically in roots of a majority of terrestrial plant species. Due to a lack of understanding of AM fungal life history strategies, we still have very little power to predict the outcome of mutualistic interactions between plant and AM fungal ind...
Article
Vegetated riparian buffer strips have been established in Southern Quebec (Canada) in order to intercept nutrients such as nitrate (NO3−) and protect water quality near agricultural fields. Buffer strips may also favour denitrification through a combination of high soil moisture, NO3− and carbon supply, which could lead to the production of nitrous...

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