Pierre Legagneux

Pierre Legagneux
Université du Québec à Rimouski UQAR | uqar · Département de Biologie, Chimie et Géographie

PhD

About

70
Publications
24,610
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1,839
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - present
Université Laval
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2009 - April 2012
January 2003 - December 2008

Publications

Publications (70)
Article
Full-text available
Neonicotinoids are insecticides widely used as seed treatments that appear to have multiple negative effects on birds at a diversity of biological scales. Adult birds exposed to a low dose of imidacloprid, one of the most commonly used neonicotinoids, presented reduced fat stores, delayed migration and potentially altered orientation. However, litt...
Article
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Models incorporating seasonality are necessary to fully assess the impact of global warming on Arctic communities. Seasonal migrations are a key component of Arctic food webs that still elude current theories predicting a single community equilibrium. We develop a multi-season model of predator–prey dynamics using a hybrid dynamical systems framewo...
Article
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Predator–prey interactions in natural ecosystems generate complex food webs that have a simple universal body-size architecture where predators are systematically larger than their prey. Food-web theory shows that the highest predator–prey body-mass ratios found in natural food webs may be especially important because they create weak interactions...
Article
Many birds change their partners every year and pairing may occur before arrival on the breeding grounds. Early pairing strategies can benefit mates by strengthening pair-bonds and increasing the rate of pre-breeding resource acquisition, leading to increased reproductive output and success, especially for migratory species breeding in seasonally-c...
Article
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To invest in energetically demanding life history stages, individuals require a substantial amount of resources. Physiological traits, particularly those related to energetics, can be useful for examining variation in life history decisions and trade‐offs because they result from individual responses to environmental variation. Leptin is a protein...
Article
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Indirect impacts of climate change, mediated by new species interactions (including pathogens or parasites) will likely be key drivers of biodiversity reorganization. In addition, direct effects of extreme weather events remain understudied. Simultaneous investigation of the significance of ectoparasites on host populations and extreme weather even...
Article
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1.A combination of timing of and body condition (i.e., mass) at arrival on the breeding grounds interact to influence the optimal combination of the timing of reproduction and clutch size in migratory species. This relationship has been formalized by Rowe et al. in a condition‐dependent individual optimization model (American Naturalist, 1994, 143,...
Article
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Scientists, policy makers, and journalists are three key, interconnected players involved in prioritizing and implementing solutions to mitigate the consequences of anthropogenic pressures on the environment. The way in which information is framed and expertise is communicated by the media is crucial for political decisions and for the integrated m...
Article
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Determining how environmental conditions interact with individual intrinsic properties is important for unravelling the underlying mechanisms that drive variation in reproductive decisions among migratory species. We investigated the influence of sea ice conditions and body condition at arrival on the breeding propensity, i.e. the decision to repro...
Article
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Overabundant species can strongly impact ecosystem functioning through trophic cascades. The strong increase in several arctic geese populations, primarily due to changes in agricultural practices in temperate regions, can have severe direct impacts on tundra ecosystems through vegetation degradation. However, predator-mediated negative effects of...
Article
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For migratory species, acquisition and allocation of energy after arrival on the breeding grounds largely determine reproductive decisions. Few studies have investigated underlying physiological mechanisms driving variation in breeding phenology so far. We linked physiological state to individual timing of breeding in pre-laying arctic-nesting fema...
Conference Paper
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Since the mid-20th century, climate change and biodiversity loss have been identified as major consequences of anthropological pressures and both have already transgressed safe limits. Given their significance for human health and well-being and their large-scale effects, international cooperation is crucial to address these issues. Intergovernment...
Article
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The influence of variation in individual state on key reproductive decisions impacting fitness is well appreciated in evolutionary ecology. Rowe et al. (1994) developed a condition-dependent individual optimization model predicting that three key factors impact the ability of migratory female birds to individually optimize breeding phenology to max...
Article
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Understanding the mechanisms responsible for stability and persistence of ecosystems is one of the greatest challenges in ecology. Robert May showed that, contrary to intuition, complex randomly built ecosystems are less likely to be stable than simpler ones. Few attempts have been tried to test May's prediction empirically, and we still ignore wha...
Article
Th eoretically, individuals of migratory species should optimize reproductive investment based on a combination of timing of and body condition at arrival on the breeding grounds. A minimum threshold body mass is required to initiate reproduction, and the timing of reaching this threshold is critical because of the trade-off between delaying breedi...
Article
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The survival of captive-bred individuals from release into the wild to their first breeding season is crucial to assess the success of reintroduction or translocation programmes, and to assess their potential impact of wild populations. However, assessing the survival of captive-bred individuals following their release is often complicated by immed...
Article
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The consequences of releasing captive-bred game animals into the wild have received little attention, despite their potential demographic impact, as well as costs and/or benefits for recipient populations. If restocking aims at increasing harvest opportunities, increased hunting pressure is expected, which would then be supported by either wild or...
Article
Environmental constraints are strong in migratory species that breed in the Arctic. In addition to breeding, Anatidae have to renew all their flight feathers during the short arctic summer. We examine how temporal constraints and climate affect the phenology of flight feather moult in the greater snow goose (Chen caerulescens atlantica), a High Arc...
Article
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Under varying prey abundance, generalist consumers should be less affected than specialists due to their more diverse diet. Nonetheless, when prey availability declines, interspecific competition among consumers should increase and could lead to increased intraguild predation. We examined these potential effects in a generalist predator of the tund...
Article
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Dispersal is a fundamental life history trait in animals that governs species distribution and population dynamics. However, the key mechanisms that promote dispersal are difficult to identify and remain unclear for most free-living organisms. Inbreeding avoidance is commonly invoked as a major driver of dispersal, but inbreeding can also be favour...
Article
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For birds, unpredictable environments during the energetically stressful times of moulting and breeding are expected to have negative fitness effects. Detecting those effects however, might be difficult if individuals modulate their physiology and/or behaviours in ways to minimize short-term fitness costs. Corticosterone in feathers (CORTf) is thou...
Article
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Integrative biologists have long appreciated that the effective acquisition and management of energy prior to breeding should strongly influence fitness-related reproductive decisions (timing of breeding and reproductive investment). However, because of the difficulty in capturing pre-breeding individuals, and the tendency towards abandonment of re...
Article
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Top predators and scavengers are vulnerable to pollutants, particularly those accumulated along the food chain. Lead accumulation can induce severe disorders and alter survival both in mammals (including humans) and in birds. A potential source of lead poisoning in wild animals, and especially in scavengers, results from the consumption of ammuniti...
Data
Table S1. Model selection based on information-theoretic approach to assess the effect of immune parameters on mortality. Figure S1. Probability of mortality in relation to the first two components of a Principal Component Analysis. Figure S2. Relationship between immune parameters and clutch size in incubating common eider females. Appendix S1. Bo...
Article
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In natural populations, epidemics provide opportunities to look for intense natural selection on genes coding for life history and immune or other physiological traits. If the populations being considered are of management or conservation concern, then identifying the traits under selection (or ‘markers’) might provide insights into possible interv...
Article
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Indirect interactions in food webs can strongly influence the net effect of global change on ecological communities yet they are rarely quantified and hence remain poorly understood. Using a 22-year time series, we investigated climate-induced and predator-mediated indirect effects on grazing intensity in the tundra food web of Bylot Island, which...
Article
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Significant progress has been made in our understanding of species-level responses to climate change, but upscaling to entire ecosystems remains a challenge. This task is particularly urgent in the Arctic, where global warming is most pronounced. Here we report the results of an international collaboration on the direct and indirect effects of clim...
Article
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Management of migratory game birds must be considered at the flyway scale. Flyway delineation has generally relied on ring recoveries, yet migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering grounds is often difficult to demonstrate due to low ring-recovery rates. To overcome the limitations of ring recoveries, we here relied on stable-hydrogen i...
Article
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The effects of environmental perturbations or stressors on individual states can be carried over to subsequent life stages and ultimately affect survival and reproduction. The concentration of corticosterone (CORT) in feathers is an integrated measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity during the molting period, providing information on the...
Article
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Allochthonous input of resources (i.e., originating from a place other than where they are found) can have a significant impact on food availability for consumers. We assessed the impact of an allochthonous source of food (the sewage outfall stream of a military base) on an avian predator breeding in a low-productivity, high-arctic site (Alert, 83°...
Article
Behavioural responses can help species persist in habitats modified by humans. Roads and traffic greatly affect animals' mortality not only through habitat structure modifications but also through direct mortality owing to collisions. Although species are known to differ in their sensitivity to the risk of collision, whether individuals can change...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural responses can help species persist in habitats modified by humans. Roads and traffic greatly affect animals' mortality not only through habitat structure modifications but also through direct mortality owing to collisions. Although species are known to differ in their sensitivity to the risk of collision, whether individuals can change...
Article
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We performed a stability analysis of 119 quantitative food webs which were compiled using a standard methodology to build Ecopath mass-balance models. Our analysis reveals that classic descriptors of complexity do not affect stability in natural food webs. Food web structure, which is non-random in real communities, reflects another form of complex...
Article
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Arctic wildlife is often presented as being highly at risk in the face of current climate warming. We use the long-term (up to 24 years) monitoring records available on Bylot Island in the Canadian Arctic to examine temporal trends in population attributes of several terrestrial vertebrates and in primary production. Despite a warming trend (e.g. c...
Article
Markers are widely used to study behavior, migration, and the life history traits of birds such as survival, dispersal, and reproductive success. The presence of neck collars has been shown to impact the breeding propensity of adult female Greater Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens atlantica), but not their survival rates. We evaluated the hypothesis th...
Article
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Arctic arthropods are essential prey for many vertebrates, including birds, but arthropod populations and phenology are susceptible to climate change. The objective of this research was to model the relationship between seasonal changes in arthropod abundance and weather variables using data from a collaborative pan-Canadian (Southampton, Herschel,...
Article
Iridescent colours produced during moult likely play an important role in pair formation in birds. We sought to quantify geographic variation in such colouration in a duck species, Eurasian teal Anas crecca , in winter (when mating occurs) to evaluate whether this variation refl ects birds ’ breeding origins or diff erential individual migration st...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the manner in which food webs will respond to environmental changes is difficult because the relative importance of top-down vs. bottom-up forces in controlling ecosystems is still debated. This is especially true in the Arctic tundra where, despite relatively simple food webs, it is still unclear which forces dominate in this ecosystem...
Article
Within the paradigm of resource-limited competition-structured communities, dabbling ducks (Anas spp.) have been used as a textbook example of how morphological differences, notably bill lamellar density and body length, may allow sympatric species to partition food and hence coexist. We reviewed all accessible diet studies from the Western Palearc...
Article
Is the satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) an adequate proxy for the timing of the peak in plant nitrogen concentration in an Arctic tundra system? Can NDVI be used to reliably assess seasonal changes in aboveground plant biomass? The south plain of Bylot Island, an Arctic tundra ecosystem north of Baffin Island, Nunavut...
Article
In many organisms, including snakes, trophic niche partitioning is an important mechanism promoting species coexistence. In ectotherms, feeding strategies are also influenced by lifestyle and thermoregulatory requirements: active foragers tend to maintain high body temperatures, expend more energy, and thus necessitate higher energy income. We stud...
Data
Determining the manner in which food webs will respond to environmental changes is difficult because the relative importance of top-down vs. bottom-up forces in controlling ecosystems is still debated. This is especially true in the Arctic tundra where, despite relatively simple food webs, it is still unclear which forces dominate in this ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
It is increasingly recognized that ecosystems are not closed systems and that exchanges of resources across ecosystem boundaries can have repercussions on food webs, especially in low productivity systems such as the terrestrial Arctic. However, because these exchanges can take multiple forms, assessing their significance in the functioning of the...
Article
Full-text available
Dabbling ducks are important quarry species, and as a result, they are relatively well studied. Over the last century, considerable effort has been made to describe their diet and food requirements. In this review, we compile present knowledge about the diet of four widespread dabbling ducks (wigeon, pintail, mallard and teal) in the Western Palear...
Article
Full-text available
Capsule Clutch size and female body mass play major roles in duck incubation behaviour.Aims To investigate the effects of incubation stage, clutch size, body size, body mass and weather on incubation attentiveness.Methods Incubation behaviour was monitored with Temperature Data Loggers (TDLs). Nest temperature fluctuations were recorded both in the...
Article
Full-text available
Despite observational evidence of carry-over effects (COEs, events occurring in one season that produce residual effects on individuals the following seasons), to our knowledge no experimental studies have been carried out to explore how COEs might affect reproductive output. We simulated an environmental perturbation affecting spring-staging migra...
Article
Baseline glucocorticoid (CORT) levels in plasma are increasingly used as physiological indices of the relative condition or health of individuals and populations. The major limitation is that CORT production is stimulated by the stress associated with capture and handling. Measuring fecal CORT is one way to solve this problem because elevation of f...
Article
Full-text available
Determining factors that affect post-fledging dispersal and survival is key toward a better understanding of the population dynamics of species with a propensity for range expansion, such as the Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto). By radio tracking, we assessed the survival, causes of mortality, movements, and emigration of 41 juvenile...
Article
Full-text available
Baseline glucocorticoid (CORT) levels in plasma are increasingly used as physiological indices of the relative condition or health of individuals and populations. The major limitation is that CORT production is stimulated by the stress associated with capture and handling. Measuring fecal CORT is one way to solve this problem because elevation of f...
Article
Full-text available
Despite observational evidence of carry-over effects (COEs, events occurring in one season that produce residual effects on individuals the following seasons), to our knowledge no experimental studies have been carried out to explore how COEs might affect reproductive output. We simulated an environmental perturbation affecting spring-staging migra...
Article
Growing empirical evidence supports the hypothesis of male mate choice for female ornaments which are thought to reflect individual quality and future breeding ability. While structural colors are clearly used in mate choice and pairing, the condition dependence of such traits is less obvious, particularly in females. We present spectral measuremen...
Article
Full-text available
Classical sampling methods often miss important components of coral reef biodiversity, notably organisms that remain sheltered within the coral matrix. Recent studies using sea kraits (sea snakes) as bio-indicators suggest that the guild of predators represented by anguilliform fish (Congridae, Muraenidae, Ophichthidae, henceforth “eels” for simpli...